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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

James Hurtt

Increasingly, publishers are looking to sell through library consortia. The advantages of consortia to publishers include the ability to simplify the sales process, to…

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814

Abstract

Increasingly, publishers are looking to sell through library consortia. The advantages of consortia to publishers include the ability to simplify the sales process, to help publishers increase their market penetration and communication with more libraries, and increase the speed of sales. However, all consortia are not organized in the same way, which requires that publishers work with different consortia in different ways. Publishers will need to continue to maintain their own marketing and sales staff to augment the services that may be available through the consortium, and to overcome problems such as inconsistent communications to libraries. Publishers will also need to have strategies to work with multiple consortia with overlapping memberships.

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Library Consortium Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-2760

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Hafsah Mohd, Rosnah Yusof and Rohaya Umar

This paper aims to report on several initiatives towards formation of national consortium among academic libraries in Malaysia. The consortium focused on subscription of…

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1354

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on several initiatives towards formation of national consortium among academic libraries in Malaysia. The consortium focused on subscription of online databases.

Design/methodology/approach

In July 2004, CDC on behalf of PERPUN members made several initiatives towards formation of national consortium of Malaysian academic libraries. Proposal paper on the formation of the consortium has been submitted to the Ministry of Higher Education. Through “loose consortia” formed, CDC and later known as Malaysian Online E-Resources Consortium (MOLEC) succeeded in negotiating for subscription of online databases and was able to get financial aid from the Ministry of Education to subscribe several databases since 2002.

Findings

A commercial databases committee (CDC) was formed in year 2000 as a platform for academic libraries to evaluate, select, negotiate and manage the online databases. Complications involved in online databases subscriptions such as cost increase, license agreement, various formats of usage statistics, merger and takeover of publishers have made PERPUN (Malaysian Standing Conference of National and University Libraries) realize that there is a need for a formal consortium to be formed.

Research limitations/implications

An improved service was established for the benefit of the academic libraries in Malaysia.

Practical implications

A more coordinated approach to consortial dealings is being established in Malaysia.

Originality/value

This is a report on the process and outcomes.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Yeon‐Hee Park

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Korean consortia models generally and discuss how the consortium governing body, Korea Education & Research Information…

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1497

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Korean consortia models generally and discuss how the consortium governing body, Korea Education & Research Information Service (KERIS), manages the e‐book consortium effectively from the Korean perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is conducted with overall consortia models of online resources by KERIS. Over several years of modeling it has contrived to develop a few consortia modeling patterns in Korea and assess their effectiveness on collection management. The e‐book consortium modeling process entailed the following: identifying the appropriate consortium model, sampling the consortium size for pricing models and selecting the criteria for e‐book title selection.

Findings

Two types of e‐book consortium models are presented. One is the subscription model and the other is the purchasing model. Both sharing and purchasing options are quite cost‐effective for Korean universities since they try to balance the digital and paper collections. The consortium model for e‐books in Korean universities was successful and fit into the conservative collection management in Korea for academic use. Also, perpetual access and purchase model is preferred rather than annual access and lease model.

Originality/value

Online resources including e‐books need a sustainable model for continuous access due to budget constraints. Considering the life‐span of information we need to find the appropriate business and service models for all the resources available online. Various criteria for consortia have been presented. No previous research has been conducted on the nationwide consortium model in Korean universities.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Kun‐Huang Huarng and Hui‐Chuan Winnie Wang

This paper aims to share the successful experiences and suggestions from the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to share the successful experiences and suggestions from the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of the participant libraries of the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium was conducted. Survey results were analyzed.

Findings

The consortium improved the Chinese collections with perpetual ownership, and demonstrated the bargaining power that exists through a consortium. Most participants would consider joining the consortium in the future.

Research limitations/implications

Since the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium has only just been completed, the usage statistics have not been compiled. It will be interesting to see how readers adapt to the Chinese e‐books in the future.

Practical implications

The results have practical implications for the operation of library consortia.

Originality/value

This study provides the latest opinions and suggestions from the consortium participants, which can be valuable to those who are interested in initiating new library consortia. The study results can also be of value to librarians who are considering joining any library consortia.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Jean K. Mulhern

Are library consortia agile organizations? That is, do they have the leadership capacity to respond quickly to or drive change in complex environments? To explore the…

Abstract

Are library consortia agile organizations? That is, do they have the leadership capacity to respond quickly to or drive change in complex environments? To explore the related issues of library consortium agility and leadership, the author developed a case study of the Ohio Private Academic Libraries (referred to hereafter as OPAL) consortium, 1998–2007. This chapter describes the OPAL experience and summarizes her findings, conclusions, and recommendations.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-580-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Hilary Bradbury-Huang, Benyamin Lichtenstein, John S. Carroll and Peter M. Senge

Corporations are now collaborating to meet complex global sustainability challenges, which, until recently, were considered beyond the mandate of business leaders…

Abstract

Corporations are now collaborating to meet complex global sustainability challenges, which, until recently, were considered beyond the mandate of business leaders. Multi-organizational consortia have formed, not as philanthropic efforts, but to find competitive advantage. To examine the dynamics of an early collaboration of this sort, with a view to suggesting how future inter-organizational projects might be fostered, we pursued an in-depth multi-method case study of “The Sustainability Consortium.” The Consortium has convened Fortune 50 senior managers since 1998. Our analysis uncovers the primacy of “Relational Space” – a rich context for aspirational trust and reflective learning across organizational boundaries, which is enabled by, and in turn gives rise to, collaborative projects. Within this space, an ecology of organizational leaders committed to sustainability can accomplish together what would be impossible in their individual organizations. We explain the viability of this collaboration.

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Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-191-7

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Book part
Publication date: 12 March 2003

Sally Innis-Klitz and Janice E Clark

During the past decade there has been a growing consensus that study abroad experiences are valuable not only for students majoring in the language of the country in which…

Abstract

During the past decade there has been a growing consensus that study abroad experiences are valuable not only for students majoring in the language of the country in which they intend to study, but that they also provide vital experiences for students enrolled in business programs. This is a change from the early 1980s when it was rare to find a business program offering study abroad experiences for its students. The increasingly global nature of commerce and the need for business professionals to effectively interact with people in a work force growing more diverse are strong arguments for students to study abroad. In addition to exposing students to different cultures and peoples, the study abroad experience challenges students to function in unknown environments and situations, teaches students about themselves, and forces them to look critically at their own resources and values. It is the ultimate “Problem-Based Learning” experience (PBL).

Details

Study Abroad
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-192-7

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Helen Reijonen, Jani Saastamoinen and Timo Tammi

The aim is to examine the importance small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) see in different network partners regarding successful tendering in public procurement, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to examine the importance small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) see in different network partners regarding successful tendering in public procurement, and whether this perception predicts the number of joint bids and wins.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected by an electronic questionnaire which was sent to the registered users of the leading electronic platform for public procurement in Finland. The data were analysed with statistical methods.

Findings

The findings suggest that a favourable perception of the importance of horizontal networks in public procurement is associated with a larger number of joint bids and better success in joint bidding. However, the results do not establish a positive correlation between vertical networks and consortium bidding.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected from a single EU country. Since the criteria for bidding consortia may vary between countries, different results might have been achieved from other countries.

Practical implications

SMEs should be encouraged to form bidding consortia and acquire related experience. Policymakers should minimise barriers to consortium bidding, e.g. by offering more information. They should also assess the merits of joint bidding because they rarely encourage SMEs to bid as a consortium.

Social implications

Consortium bidding is a way of enhancing SMEs’ possibilities to participate in public tender contests, even in large contracts.

Originality/value

While consortium bidding has been recognised to enhance SMEs’ possibilities of participating in public procurement, there is limited research into how SMEs’ network collaborations relate to bidding as a consortium.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Catherine Maskell

Academic library consortia activity has become an integral part of academic libraries’ operations. Consortia have come to assert considerable bargaining power over…

Abstract

Academic library consortia activity has become an integral part of academic libraries’ operations. Consortia have come to assert considerable bargaining power over publishers and have provided libraries with considerable economic advantage. They interact with publishers both as consumers of publishers’ products, with much stronger bargaining power than individual libraries hold, and, increasingly, as rival publishers themselves. Are consortia changing the relationship between academic libraries and publishers? Is the role of academic library consortia placing academic libraries in a position that should and will attract the attention of competition policy regulators? Competition policy prohibits buying and selling cartels that can negatively impact the free market on which the Canadian economic system, like other Western economies, depends. Competition policy as part of economic policy is, however, only relevant where we are concerned with aspects of the market economy. Traditionally, public goods for the greater social and cultural benefit of society are not considered part of the market economic system. If the activities of academic library consortia are part of that public good perspective, competition policy may not be a relevant concern. Using evidence gained from in-depth interviews from a national sample of university librarians and from interviews with the relevant federal government policy makers, this research establishes whether library consortia are viewed as participating in the market economy of Canada or not. Are consortia viewed by librarians and government as serving a public good role of providing information for a greater social and cultural benefit or are they seen from a market-economic perspective of changing power relations with publishers? Findings show government has little in-depth understanding of academic library consortia activity, but would most likely consider such activity predominantly from a market economic perspective. University librarians view consortia from a public good perspective but also as having an important future role in library operations and in changing the existing scholarly publishing paradigm. One-third of librarian respondents felt that future consortia could compete with publishers by becoming publishers and through initiatives such as open source institutional repositories. Librarians also felt that consortia have had a positive effect on librarians’ professional roles through the facilitation of knowledge building and collaboration opportunities outside of the home institution.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-580-2

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Cherry-Ann Smart and Christina Stewart-Fullerton

This chapter explores the feasibility of establishing a consortium for the sharing of electronic resources between two libraries: the University of the West Indies at Mona…

Abstract

This chapter explores the feasibility of establishing a consortium for the sharing of electronic resources between two libraries: the University of the West Indies at Mona and the University of Technology, Jamaica, both of which are located in Kingston. After a description of the institutional and library contexts, the two libraries are compared in terms of missions, staffing, funding, and collections and other differences and similarities including the e-resources. To analyze the feasibility of establishing a partnership/consortium, the exploration and evaluation of formation of a consortium were done using three kinds of analysis: a literature review, interviews, and a review of existing processes and documentation. The data gathering methods and results are described followed by a potential blueprint for implementation. The researchers did not interview or solicit the views of the university administrators and governing bodies or government officials as to the feasibility of such cooperation in light of the tentative nature of the investigation. The authors however worked with the premise that with the proper infrastructure, a consortium between the two universities would be viable. Other institutions considering development or formation of potential consortia might find the approach and methods in this chapter useful as a possible methodology.

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