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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Arvid Hoffmann, Simon McNair and Jason Pallant

The purpose of the paper is to examine how psychological characteristics predict membership of and transitions between states of higher vs lower financial vulnerability …

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine how psychological characteristics predict membership of and transitions between states of higher vs lower financial vulnerability – and vice versa – over time.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a dynamic latent class model (latent transition analysis) to explore the dynamics of consumers’ financial vulnerability over time using longitudinal data obtained by repeatedly administering a measure of financial vulnerability.

Findings

This research finds that consumers in a state of lower vulnerability are “fragile” in having a relatively high likelihood of moving to a state of higher vulnerability, whereas those in a state of higher vulnerability are “entrenched” in having a relatively low likelihood of moving to a state of lower vulnerability. This pattern of results is called the “financial vulnerability trap.” While financial self-efficacy explains state membership, the consideration of future consequences drives state transitions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could follow consumers over a longer period and consider the role of alternative psychological characteristics besides those examined.

Practical implications

This research provides practitioners with actionable insights regarding the drivers of changes in consumers’ financial vulnerability across time, showing the value of financial self-efficacy and the consideration of future consequences when developing strategies to prevent consumers from sliding from a state of lower to higher financial vulnerability over time.

Originality/value

There is scant research on financial vulnerability. Further, prior research has not examined whether and how consumers’ psychological characteristics help explain their membership of and transitions between states of different levels of financial vulnerability over time.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Roberta J. Schultz and David J. Good

The value of long‐term relationships has become a widely studied variable in marketing. This article investigates two important characteristics of salespeople …

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Abstract

The value of long‐term relationships has become a widely studied variable in marketing. This article investigates two important characteristics of salespeople (consideration of future sales consequences and customer‐oriented selling) and their effects on the usage of long‐term relationships. In turn, associations between a long‐term relationship orientation, and a preference for long‐term compensation are explored. The findings suggest managerial and research implications for structuring of reward systems and potential tools for recruiting, selection and assignment of salespeople based on these characteristics.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

Siew H. Chan and Qian Song

This study investigates whether consideration of future consequences (CFC), Machiavellianism (MACH) and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates whether consideration of future consequences (CFC), Machiavellianism (MACH) and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR) enhance understanding of the impact of tax audit risk on compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment is conducted to test the hypotheses. A hypothetical tax audit case (or lack thereof) is used to create a high (low) perceived tax audit risk. The usable responses of 144 participants representing the general taxpayer population are analyzed.

Findings

The results suggest that taxpayers with lower CFC, MACH or PRESOR scores are more compliant when tax audit risk is high than low. In contrast, taxpayers with higher CFC, MACH or PRESOR scores are indifferent toward high or low tax audit risk.

Research limitations/implications

Research can elicit consideration of future consequences of being detected for taxpayers with lower CFC scores to increase compliance. Additionally, increased saliency of tax audit risk and detection of noncompliance in a tax audit can enhance the compliance of taxpayers with lower MACH scores. Dissemination of information via social media on the value of ethical and social responsibility of compliance can also increase the compliance of taxpayers with higher PRESOR scores.

Practical implications

This study helps researchers and the tax authority better understand the complexities of compliance and the ethical dilemmas that taxpayers face, especially when a considerable amount of cash income is involved. To deter underreporting of cash income, the tax authority can use social media to explain how data analytics tools can facilitate the analysis and integration of multiple sources of a taxpayer’s income and expenses.

Originality/value

Prior studies present participants with objective tax audit rates, such as 5, 25 and 30 (Cullis et al., 2006; Maciejovsky et al., 2007; Trivedi et al., 2003) or 50% (Maciejovsky et al., 2012) to investigate tax compliance. However, the actual tax audit rate is very low (about 1%) due to the limited resources of the tax authority (Alm and Torgler, 2011). To attenuate perceptions of unrealistic tax audit rates, this study operationalizes high (low) tax audit risk via a hypothetical tax audit case (or lack thereof) to examine the impact of tax audit risk on compliance.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Leigh Plunkett Tost, Morela Hernandez and Kimberly A. Wade-Benzoni

We review previous research on intergenerational conflict, focusing on the practical implications of this research for organizational leaders. We explain how the…

Abstract

We review previous research on intergenerational conflict, focusing on the practical implications of this research for organizational leaders. We explain how the interaction between the interpersonal and intertemporal dimensions of intergenerational decisions creates the unique psychology of intergenerational decision-making behavior. In addition, we review the boundary conditions that have characterized much of the previous research in this area, and we examine the potential effects of loosening these constraints. Our proposals for future research include examination of the effect of intra-generational decision making on intergenerational beneficence, consideration of the role of third parties and linkage issues, investigation of the effects of intergenerational communications and negotiation when generations can interact, examination of the role of social power in influencing intergenerational interactions, investigation of the interaction between temporal construal and immortality striving, and exploration of the ways in which present decision makers detect and define the intergenerational dilemmas in their social environments.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-004-9

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Hajar Fatemi and Laurette Dube

This paper aims to study the unexplored possibility that priming firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) activity in consumers’ minds may impact consumers’ preference…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the unexplored possibility that priming firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) activity in consumers’ minds may impact consumers’ preference for non-firm related consumption and lifestyle choice options with intertemporal trade-offs.

Design/methodology/approach

Across four experimental studies, the authors looked at the impact of CSR priming on the preference of participants for later larger versus sooner smaller money (Study 1), saving versus spending (Study 2) and healthy versus unhealthy food choices (Studies 3 and 4). These choice options were not related to the focal firm that practiced CSR. The authors measured the changes in participants’ consideration of future consequences (CFC) as a potential mediator for the results.

Findings

The participants in the CSR condition showed a higher CFC and a higher preference for the options with long-term benefits and immediate costs over the ones with long-term costs and immediate benefits, i.e. later larger over sooner smaller money, saving over spending and healthy over unhealthy food. The authors documented a mediation role for CFC.

Research limitations/implications

All the participants in the studies were from the USA. Looking at the cultural differences can enrich the understanding of the impact of CSR on preference for the options with intertemporal trade-offs. Furthermore, this paper builds its theoretical justification based on the assumption of individuals’ acceptance of CSR activities. Nevertheless, consumers may have skepticism about these activities. Future studies may investigate the effect of CSR skepticism of individuals on the proposed effects. Additionally, investigating the moderating roles of individuals’ characteristics like their prosocial concern or their knowledge about choice options might be an avenue for future research.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the benefits of CSR priming on consumers’ welfare and normative behavior. Firms may use the findings to understand and manage the impact of other firms’ CSR communications on the evaluation of their own products.

Originality/value

This research is the first to highlight the impact of CSR priming on consumers’ non-firm-related consumption and lifestyle choices with intertemporal trade-offs. The results showed the positive effect of priming firms’ CSR activities on consumers’ CFC and the mediating role of CFC.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2017

Jihye Lee, Seokhwa Yun and Seckyoung Loretta Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of an employee’s consideration of future consequences (CFCs) in predicting employee task performance and its situational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of an employee’s consideration of future consequences (CFCs) in predicting employee task performance and its situational contexts (i.e. organizational support and supervisor support) based on trait activation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross-sectional field study design, data were collected from 189 employees and their immediate supervisors in South Korea.

Findings

Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that employees’ CFC has a positive effect on their task performance. Furthermore, this study investigated whether this relationship would be varied by relevant situational factors. Consistent with the hypotheses, the relevance of CFC to employees’ task performance would be stronger when they perceive low levels of organizational support based on trait activation theory.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the importance of employees’ CFC on task performance. Also, organizations should pay more attention to the way of compensating for employees with low levels of CFC by fostering supportive environment.

Originality/value

Although researchers have been examined long-term perspectives in the business field, a few studies have examined its effect at the individual level. This paper identified not only the main effect of CFC on employee task performance but also the moderating role of organizational support on the aforementioned relationship.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Bilal Ahmad and Nadia Nasir

This study examines the relationship of positive career shocks and career optimism. The mediating role of career decision-making self-efficacy (CDSE) between positive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship of positive career shocks and career optimism. The mediating role of career decision-making self-efficacy (CDSE) between positive career shocks and career optimism, and the moderating role of consideration of future consequences – immediate (CFC-I) between CDSE and career optimism is checked.

Design/methodology/approach

Through cluster sampling, cross-sectional data from 192 professionals of electronic media industry were collected via an electronically administered questionnaire. For preliminary descriptive data analysis SPSS version 21 was used. SmartPLS version 3.0 was used for testing the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that positive career shocks have a relationship with career optimism via CDSE. Also, CFC-I moderated the relationship of CDSE and career optimism such that the relationship of CDSE and career optimism was stronger at higher level of CFC-I.

Practical implications

The study provides implications for the career consultants, human resource professionals and senior management of organizations. All these stakeholders can strive to build an inventory of positive career shocks. Also, shifting to a surprised business model of announcing compensations and promotions is another area to work on. The results of this study further suggest disengaging the fresh potential employees in the initial processes of recruitment. Interdepartmental coordination of health and safety department and human resource management department is also very important implication of this study to highlight the positive aspects of being optimistic.

Originality/value

The study is among the few empirical studies which investigates the relationship between positive career shocks and career optimism via CDSE. Also, in light of the latest call of various empirical works in the domain, this study adds a moderating variable i.e. CFC-I in predicting career optimism. Furthermore, contrary to the conventional approach of applying students' data on career models, this study tests the proposed career model on data collected from professionals.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Shahin Dezdar

The effect of global warming on our environment has shifted the focus to green technologies worldwide. Subsequently, multiple research studies have attempted to assess…

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1758

Abstract

Purpose

The effect of global warming on our environment has shifted the focus to green technologies worldwide. Subsequently, multiple research studies have attempted to assess awareness around the concept of “Green IT” in different countries. This paper aims to examine the factors that affect the intention to use green information technology (IT) (INT) and their subsequent influence on the actual use of green IT (ACT) among students in the context of a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using survey questionnaires administered to six public university students. A total of 633 valid questionnaires were received and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

A positive relationship of INT with attitude toward green IT, subjective norms toward green IT, perceived behavioral control toward green IT, consideration of future consequences and openness was found, and also, a positive relationship between INT and ACT was found.

Originality/value

Many of prior research focused on factors influencing green IT adoption and usage from the organizational point of view, and there is not much literature dedicated to the study of IT users’ belief and behavior about green IT. Moreover, most studies tend to focus on developed nations, while a lesser number of studies gave consideration to developing nations. This study proposes a research framework that incorporated two personality trait factors to the theory of planned behavior to investigate individual factors influencing INT among students in the context of a developing country.

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2020

Li-Keng Cheng and Chung-Lin Toung

Fear appeals in advertising communication are considered by advertisers when other types of advertising appeals do not achieve expected effects. Fear appeals, by arousing…

Abstract

Purpose

Fear appeals in advertising communication are considered by advertisers when other types of advertising appeals do not achieve expected effects. Fear appeals, by arousing the fear that something may threaten consumers’ present lives, are often adopted to persuade individuals to take a particular action. Although this topic has been widely studied, the internal operation mechanism of fear appeals in consumers has not been fully understood or agreed upon.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted where the type of fear appeal was manipulated (i.e. physical fear appeal or social ear appeal), as well as consumers’ consideration of future consequences (CFC) and mental imagery approaches.

Findings

This study examined the effects of fear appeal on mental imagery fluency and how it affects advertising effectiveness and the moderating effect of consumers’ CFC were discussed. When receiving advertisements with physical fear appeals, consumers with low CFC had greater mental imagery fluency than did those with high CFC. Furthermore, consumers’ purchase intentions could be improved by increasing consumers’ mental imagery fluency on fear appeal. Therefore, the interaction between fear appeal and CFC on purchase intention was mediated by mental imagery fluency. This study found that consumers responded differently to fear appeal advertising when they engaged in different mental imagery approaches.

Originality/value

The present study adds to social marketing literature by showing how consumers’ mental imagery fluency influence the fear appeal effectiveness, and this study’s results also enable social marketers to understand the two factors (i.e. consumers’ CFC level and mental imagery approaches) that affect the influence of fear appeals on consumers’ purchase intentions. Moreover, social marketers are recommended to provide consumers with advertising information by using various message types to facilitate consumers’ imagination of advertising appeals. This heightens the importance of consumers’ acceptance and absorption of advertising content, in turn, strengthening their purchase intentions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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