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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Jose Arif Lukito, Connie Susilawati and Ashantha Goonetilleke

The purpose of this paper is to provide a strategy to integrate climate change adaptation (CCA) in public asset management (PAM) in Indonesia. This paper focusses on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a strategy to integrate climate change adaptation (CCA) in public asset management (PAM) in Indonesia. This paper focusses on public buildings as part of a public asset.

Design/methodology/approach

As an archipelagic country, Indonesia is very vulnerable to sea-level rise as a result of climate change. The outcomes of a qualitative analysis of interviews with relevant stakeholders were used for the development of the CCA framework in an Indonesian context.

Findings

The study identified that the integration of CCA in PAM in Indonesia requires the incorporation of nine key elements. These are as follows: recognition of climate change; risk management and insurance schemes for assets; integrated asset management and planning; asset use and knowledge; reliable, accessible and understandable data set on climate change; leadership, government commitment and incentives; involvement of research and private entities; community engagement; and coordination of relevant agencies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper informed only the key elements required on the development of framework which integrate CCA in PAM.

Practical implications

The integration of CCA to a PAM framework will support the development of policies and procedures for better-informed decisions.

Social implications

The framework increases opportunities for stakeholders and community engagement in policy development and decision making in relation to CCA for public assets.

Originality/value

This paper synthesises CCA and PAM using knowledge from the three levels of governments in Australia and Indonesia. CCA and PAM groups work separately in Indonesia and integration will reduce climate change risks and improve decision making in PAM.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Mohammed Saied Al Surf, Bambang Trigunarsyah and Connie Susilawati

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to bridge the gap between sustainable housing and the use of smart technologies to improve the level of sustainability in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to bridge the gap between sustainable housing and the use of smart technologies to improve the level of sustainability in the housing construction in Saudi Arabia, by discussing the barriers and enablers concerned with applying sustainability to housing construction in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi method survey was employed, for which 25 individuals from three key stakeholder groups of the Saudi housing sector participated. They were asked about their degree of agreement (or disagreement) about the various barriers and enablers of applying sustainability to housing construction in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies. This research paper must be considered as an indicative study of selected experts that do not represent in any way the total population of Saudi Arabia.

Findings

Lack of public awareness has been identified as the most significant barrier in implementing sustainable housing development in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies. Raising awareness of the public to the benefits of sustainable housing and enlightening key project stakeholders in the design of sustainable housing are both essential in order to overcome the barriers discussed in this paper. In addition, it is important to adopt smart sustainable construction methods, exemplified by but not limited to, appropriate water preservation and wastewater treatment systems that are simultaneously smart and sustainable.

Research limitations/implications

This particular research has dealt with only barriers and enablers in the application of sustainability to housing in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies. For a more complete understanding, there is a need for further analysis of supplementary factors.

Practical implications

A study such as this, which identifies and prioritises barriers and enablers, could prove useful in guiding or encouraging the relevant ministry in Saudi Arabia to develop policies founded in the implementation of sustainability to the housing sector.

Originality/value

This research is a preliminary investigation into the implementation of sustainable housing development as it relates to Saudi Arabia.

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Connie Susilawati

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the risk management process conducted by some private and not‐for‐profit affordable housing providers in South East Queensland, and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the risk management process conducted by some private and not‐for‐profit affordable housing providers in South East Queensland, and draw conclusions about the relationship between risk assessments/responses and past experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews of selected non‐government housing providers have been conducted to facilitate an understanding of their approach to risk assessment in developing and in managing affordable housing projects. Qualitative data are analysed using thematic analysis to find emerging themes suggested by interview participants.

Findings

The paper finds that informal risk management process is used as part of normal business process in accordance with industry standards. Many interviewees agree that the recognition of financial risk and the fear of community rejection of such housing projects have restrained them from committing to such investment projects. The levels of acceptance of risk are not always consistent across housing providers which create opportunities to conduct multi‐stakeholder partnership to reduce overall risk.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has implications for developers or investors who seek to include affordable housing as part of their portfolio. However, data collected in the study are a cross‐section of interviews that will not include the impact on recent tax incentives offers by the Australian Commonwealth Government.

Practical implications

The study suggests that implementing improvements to the risk mitigation and management framework may assist in promoting the supply of affordable housing by non‐government providers.

Originality/value

The focus of the study is the interaction between partnerships and risk management in development and management of affordable rental housing.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Muhammad Hasbi Hanis, Bambang Trigunarsyah and Connie Susilawati

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges faced by local government in Indonesia when adopting a public asset management framework.

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1998

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges faced by local government in Indonesia when adopting a public asset management framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study within the South Sulawesi provincial government was used as the approach to achieve the research objective. The case study involved two data collection techniques – interviews and document analysis.

Findings

The result of the study indicates there are significant challenges that the Indonesian local government need to manage when adopting a public asset management framework. Those challenges are: the absence of an institutional and legal framework to support the asset management application; the non‐profit principle of public assets; multiple jurisdictions involved in the public asset management processes; the complexity of local government objectives; the non‐availability of data for managing public property; and limited human resources.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to one case study. It is a preliminary study from larger research that uses multiple case studies. The main research also investigates opportunities for local government by adopting and implementing public asset management.

Originality/value

The paper's findings provide useful input for the policy makers, academics and asset management practitioners in Indonesia to establish a public asset management framework resulting in efficient and effective organizations, as well as an increase of public services quality. This study has a potential application in other developing countries.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Tri Mulyani Sunarharum, Mellini Sloan and Connie Susilawati

The purpose of this paper is to re-frame planning decision-making to address risks of flooding and to increase community resilience. Rapid urbanisation, fragmented…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-frame planning decision-making to address risks of flooding and to increase community resilience. Rapid urbanisation, fragmented governance and recurrent flooding complicate resolution of DKI Jakarta’s chronic housing shortage. Failure to effectively implement planning decision-making processes poses potential human rights violations. Contemporary planning policy requires the relocation of households living in floodplains within 15 m of DKI Jakarta’s main watercourses, further constraining land availability and potentially requiring increased densification.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a preliminary scoping study for a technologically enhanced participatory planning method, incorporating synthesis of existing information on urbanisation, governance and flood risk management in Jakarta.

Findings

Responsibility for flood risk management in DKI Jakarta is fragmented both within and across administrative boundaries. Decision-making is further complicated by: limited availability of land use data; uncertainty as to the delineated extent of watercourses, floodplains and flood modelling; unclear risk and liability for infrastructure investments; and technical literacy of both public and government participants.

Practical implications

This research provides information to facilitate consultation with government entities tasked with re-framing planning processes to increase public participation.

Social implications

Potential increased opportunities for collaborative decision-making and consequent reduction in risk exposure amongst DKI Jakarta’s most vulnerable populations can help to address issues of social justice.

Originality/value

This paper synthesises information from a range of sources not available in English, and offers insights into a complex system of governance and modes for improving decision-making.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Professor Richard Reed

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264

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Paul Barnes and Ashantha Goonetilleke

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332

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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