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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Ilhami Yucel, Muhammed Sabri Şirin and Murat Baş

This paper aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between workfamily conflict and turnover intention and whether work engagement has a mediating effect and

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between workfamily conflict and turnover intention and whether work engagement has a mediating effect and supervisor support has a moderated mediation effect in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of the study is composed of public hospital employees in Erzincan province. After removing the missing and incorrect ones from the questionnaires distributed to 1,044 employees of the hospital, 350 were evaluated. The data of the survey were analyzed and interpreted with statistical package programs. Regression analysis is used to investigate the association between the variables.

Findings

This paper finds significant negative associations of workfamily conflict with work engagement and work engagement with turnover intention. A significant positive association is found between workfamily conflict and turnover intention. In the meantime work engagement has a partial mediating effect on this relationship. Another important result of the research is that supervisor support has a moderator role between workfamily conflict and work engagement and has a moderated mediation role at the model in which workfamily conflict is independent, turnover intention is dependent and work engagement is a mediator variable.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted only in Erzincan province with a limited number of participants, and only health sector employees were examined. It is possible to obtain distinct results in future research studies conducted on different sector employees. Moreover, only the workfamily conflict variable was examined in the research. It is possible to expand the scope by also including the familywork conflict variable in future studies.

Originality/value

This research is the first study examining the mediating role of work engagement in the relationship between workfamily conflict and turnover intention on healthcare employees in Turkey. Also, this paper is the first attempt to investigate moderated mediation model with the specified variables (workfamily conflict, turnover intention, work engagement and supervisor support) in the model by using the frameworks of leader–member exchange and social exchange theories. This research answers research calls to study the moderating function of supervisor support during mediating role of work engagement, since the moderation impact clarifies the circumstances under which supervisor support is connected with the favorable results. This study also revealed how effective the supervisor support is on employees experiencing workfamily conflict and their attitudes like work engagement and turnover intention. The consequences of such studies influence the way organizations handle and solve the problems in their organizations today. It takes into account moderated mediation modeling with the management subject in hospital employees.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2020

Xiaoyu Yu, Xiaotong Meng, Gang Cao and Yingya Jia

Conflict between work and family is a significant issue for entrepreneurs. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of entrepreneurial failure on both familywork

Abstract

Purpose

Conflict between work and family is a significant issue for entrepreneurs. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of entrepreneurial failure on both familywork conflict (FWC) and workfamily conflict (WFC) and the moderating role of perceived control of time and organizational slack based on conservation of resources (COR) theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a questionnaire to explore the relationship between entrepreneurial failure, FWC/WFC, perceived control of time and organizational slack. Data were collected from the Chinese context in 2018 and as a result received 318 valid questionnaires, obtaining a response rate of 63.6 per cent.

Findings

The study finds that entrepreneurial failure has a significant relationship with FWC but a nonsignificant relationship with WFC and that perceived control of time and organizational slack moderate the relationship between entrepreneurial failure and FWC/WFC.

Originality/value

This study aligns the field of familywork (workfamily) conflict and entrepreneurial failure. It addresses a research gap in the conflict literature by introducing one form of resource loss: entrepreneurial failure as a source of conflict between work and family based on COR theory and the work–home resources model. The study also enriches the literature on the social cost of entrepreneurial failure by exploring the crossover effect of entrepreneurial failure on conflicts in the family domain. Furthermore, the study advances the understanding of managing conflict between work and family after entrepreneurial failure.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2014

Tetsushi Fujimoto, Sayaka K. Shinohara and Tsuyoshi Oohira

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression, and the moderating role of spouses’ family and job involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Methodology/approach

We use a matched sample of Japanese employed husbands and wives to examine the relationships between inter-spousal dynamics about workfamily conflict and psychological well-being.

Findings

We found that (1) the effect of WFC on depression was larger for wives, (2) husbands’ and wives’ own psychological family involvement did not moderate the relationship between WFC and their depression, and (3) spousal family and job involvement operated as a moderator only for husbands. While WFC reduced husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in their jobs psychologically and behaviorally, WFC increased husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in family at both psychological and behavioral levels.

Practical implications

Employers need to take into account the importance of looking simultaneously at the ways employed husbands and wives work when trying to understand how workplace conditions may be changed to ameliorate psychological well-being for spouses.

Originality/value of chapter

This study suggests that an experience of conflict between work and family is likely to deteriorate the psychological well-being for employed husbands and wives in non-Western contexts like Japan. Furthermore, spousal involvements in family and work domains are likely to play moderating roles in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Details

Family Relationships and Familial Responses to Health Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-015-5

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Fabienne T. Amstad and Norbert K. Semmer

Recovery seems to be one of the most important mechanisms explaining the relationship between acute stress reactions and chronic health complaints (Geurts & Sonnentag, 2006

Abstract

Recovery seems to be one of the most important mechanisms explaining the relationship between acute stress reactions and chronic health complaints (Geurts & Sonnentag, 2006). Moreover, insufficient recovery may be the linking mechanism that turns daily stress experiences into chronic stress. Given this role recovery has in the stress process, it is important to ask in which contexts and under what circumstances recovery takes place.

Details

Current Perspectives on Job-Stress Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-544-0

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Hassan Raza, Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, Joseph G. Grzywacz, Miriam R. Linver and Soyoung Lee

The current longitudinal study investigated the within- and between-person variance in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict among working mothers over time…

Abstract

The current longitudinal study investigated the within- and between-person variance in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict among working mothers over time. It also examined the effects of a nonstandard work schedule and relationship quality on work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict using bioecological theory. Results of multilevel modeling analyses showed that there was significant within- and between-person variance in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict. The linear and quadratic terms were significantly related to family-to-work conflict, whereas the quadratic term was significantly associated with work-to-family conflict. There was also a positive relationship between a nonstandard work schedule and work-to-family conflict, whereas relationship quality was negatively associated with family-to-work conflict. Future studies should consider diversity among working mothers to adequately predict workfamily conflict. The current study provides important implications for employers to consider, concerning within-and between-person differences among working mothers, which could in turn allow for accommodations and help to decrease workfamily conflict.

Details

The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Cort W. Rudolph, Jesse S. Michel, Michael B. Harari and Tyler J. Stout

Despite the abundance of research on work social support and work-family conflict, the generalizability of these relationships to immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics is…

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Abstract

Purpose

Despite the abundance of research on work social support and work-family conflict, the generalizability of these relationships to immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics is still unknown. Based on role and cultural theories, the purpose of this paper is to provide an empirical examination of these relationships within this growing yet understudied population.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from a diverse sample of employed immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics from a broad set of occupational groups within Miami, Florida (USA). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test hypotheses. Multi-group analyses were conducted to test for differences in model fit and parameter estimates between the immigrant and non-immigrant subgroups.

Findings

The hypothesized model fit the data well, with a significant positive relationship between perceived organizational social support and perceived supervisor social support, a significant negative relationship between perceived organizational social support and work-to-family conflict, and a significant negative relationship between perceived supervisor social support and family-to-work conflict. Multi-group SEM, which offered acceptable model fit, suggests that perceived organizational social support is associated with reduced work-family conflict for immigrant but not for non-immigrant Hispanics, and perceived supervisor social support is associated with reduced work-family conflict for non-immigrant but not for immigrant Hispanics.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional data do not allow for strong causal interpretations.

Practical implications

Perceived work social support is an important indicator of work-family conflict for both immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics, although specific relationships can differ based on immigration status.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated differences in work-family conflict between non-immigrant and immigrant Hispanics.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Inbar Kremer

School has been neglected as a source of stress and strain resulting from its inevitable conflict with work and family role demands among married, working students. The…

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4253

Abstract

Purpose

School has been neglected as a source of stress and strain resulting from its inevitable conflict with work and family role demands among married, working students. The meager research available has examined only work-school (not school-work) conflict among adolescents and college students and only three studies (two unpublished) have developed measures of conflict involving work, family, and school without studying its antecedents and consequences. The purpose of this paper is to examine all six school-work-family interrole conflicts and their effects on subjective stress and burnout. It was hypothesized that the greater the conflict between family, work, and school roles, the greater the subjective stress and burnout and that women experience more work-family-school conflicts than do men.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 100 working married adult students completed self-report demographic questionnaire, school-work-family conflict, subjective stress, and burnout scales.

Findings

Regression results revealed that school-work (but not work-school) conflict was the only one of the six interrole conflicts examined that contributed to subjective stress and burnout. Women reported greater work-family conflict and family-work conflict. There were no differences between men and women involving school; where gender plays no role, it causes no conflict.

Research limitations/implications

Scholars interested in interrole conflict involving family and work should expand the scope of their theories and research to include the school role.

Originality/value

The present study was the first to examine all six school-work-family interrole conflicts and their effects on subjective stress and burnout.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Juliana D. Lilly, Jo Ann Duffy and Meghna Virick

The purpose of this study is to study gender differences in the relationship between McClelland's needs, stress, and turnover intentions with workfamily conflict.

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5264

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to study gender differences in the relationship between McClelland's needs, stress, and turnover intentions with workfamily conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 383 individuals representing 15 different industries. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results suggest that McClelland's needs act as an antecedent of workfamily conflict, and that they have a differential impact on workfamily conflict for women and men.

Research limitations/implications

The subjects were college graduates, hence it was a self‐selected sample, and the results may not generalise to other populations.

Practical implications

Women are more affected by family obligations than men and this may impact the performance and turnover intentions of women in organisations.

Originality/value

This paper enhances understanding of workfamily conflict by specifically examining individual differences such as need for power, need for achievement and need for affiliation and evaluating their impact on turnover intention and job tension.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Jeffrey H. Greenhaus, Tammy D. Allen and Paul E. Spector

In this chapter, we review the literature on the relationship of workfamily conflict with health outcomes and well-being. We discuss the meaning of workfamily conflict

Abstract

In this chapter, we review the literature on the relationship of workfamily conflict with health outcomes and well-being. We discuss the meaning of workfamily conflict and then present a theoretical model that depicts the psychological process by which workfamily conflict affects negative emotions, dissatisfaction with life and its component roles, health-related behavior, and physical health. We conclude with suggestions regarding the development of a future research agenda.

Details

Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Sajeet Pradhan and Prashant Gupta

The study aims to investigate the direct and indirect effect of subordinate’s perceived abusive supervision (AS) on his/her workfamily conflict (WFC) and familywork

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to investigate the direct and indirect effect of subordinate’s perceived abusive supervision (AS) on his/her workfamily conflict (WFC) and familywork conflict (FWC). Although prior studies have empirically explored the direct effect, but the role of mediators like compulsory citizenship behavior, burnout and stress transfer explaining the indirect effect has seldom been reported.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws cross-sectional dyadic data from multiple sources (both job incumbent and the spouse). A final sample of 188 was used to test the hypotheses using SmartPLS.

Findings

The result reports positive relationship between AS and inter-role conflict (WFC and FWC). The findings also reported compulsory citizenship behavior (CCB) partially mediating the positive relationship between AS and WFC and AS and FWC. Also, the positive relationship between AS and WFC is partially (serial) mediated by CCB and burnout, and similarly, the association between AS and FWC is partially (serial) mediated by CCB and stress transmission.

Originality/value

The study makes several valuable contributions to the extant literature; first, it is the only study to explore the direct and indirect effect of AS on inter-role conflict (WFC and FWC) in Indian organizations. Second, the mediational role of CCB (as explained by the conservation of resources theory) and burnout and stress transmission (as explained by the spillover and crossover theory) offers rare insight about the process that explains the relationship between the focal constructs.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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