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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Irini L. F. Tang and Po-Ju Chen

A family of three pays a premium to upgrade to Concierge Class cabins for a cruise vacation. After setting sail, they decide to add a shore excursion (sight-seeing option…

Abstract

A family of three pays a premium to upgrade to Concierge Class cabins for a cruise vacation. After setting sail, they decide to add a shore excursion (sight-seeing option) to their vacation package. Upon making their way to the Concierge Desk, they are told that excursions are an “add-on” service provided by a third party company. The family felt that the butler service provided for Concierge Class passengers had overlooked sharing this information. The misunderstanding results in dissatisfaction with the premium Concierge services as well as the whole vacation experience. What should the cruise line company do?

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Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Hyejo Hailey Shin and Miyoung Jeong

The hotel industry has witnessed an increasing number of service automation through service robots such as robot concierges. However, few studies have documented how to…

Abstract

Purpose

The hotel industry has witnessed an increasing number of service automation through service robots such as robot concierges. However, few studies have documented how to identify how hotel guests perceive a robot concierge for their service encounter. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of robot concierges on hotel guests’ attitudes and adoption intentions of robot concierges.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigated the effects of robot concierges’ morphology and their level of interactivity with guests at different levels of hotel service on guests’ attitudes and their intentions to adopt robot concierges. To achieve the study’s objectives, this study conducted a 3 × 2 × 3 between-subjects factorial design experiment. Moreover, the survey asked questions about subjects’ preferences of their service encounters (e.g. human employees, robot concierges and/or no preference) and reasons for their selected preference.

Findings

The results demonstrated that the robot’s morphology significantly influenced guests’ attitudes toward robot concierges. In particular, the caricatured robot was the most preferred morphology of robot concierges. The findings showed that even if guests had favorable attitudes toward robot concierges, they preferred human employees to robot concierges because of humans’ sincere and genuine interactions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by investigating the causal impacts of the morphology of robot concierges, level of interactivity and level of hotel service on guests’ attitudes toward robot concierges. The thematic analysis of service encounter preference provides an overview of the factors that guests expect for their service encounters in a hotel setting.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Mhairi Sumner and Bernie Quinn

The purpose of this study is ascertain if the hotel concierge service will continue to be relevant in a technological world where consumers have increasing access to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is ascertain if the hotel concierge service will continue to be relevant in a technological world where consumers have increasing access to information about their destination. To trace the origins of the hotel concierge, their route into the profession and establish whether the profession is geographically localised. Their role within the hotel, working philosophy, core values and characteristics were considered in relation to creating and delivering an experiential service encounter.

Design/methodology/approach

Eleven participants were selected who worked on the concierge desk in four- and five-star hotels in Edinburgh. All were male, aged between 20 and 64 years old; nine were Scottish, six of whom were from Edinburgh, one from Wales and one from England. Six respondents were members of The Golden Keys Society. A qualitative approach was adopted with semi-structured interviews designed around key themes identified in the literature review.

Findings

No feelings of servility or inferiority were documented in the host/guest relationship. Comparisons were made between the contextual setting and the appearance and manner of the respondents with that of a “performance”. The uniform was deemed to facilitate feelings of empowerment analogous to having superpowers. Technology has been adopted by the concierge department as a tool, but is considered to be ancillary to their personal recommendation and network of business and personal contacts and collaborators.

Research limitations/implications

Changes in the demographics of people travelling and discounted rates being offered in four- and five-star hotels has resulted in general perceptions of a less elite clientele. This may have implications for the future of concierge services.

Practical implications

The internet seems to have opened up this profession to enable concierges to effectively operate in a location they are not indigenous to. The personal recommendations that the concierge provides through their own knowledge are used in conjunction with technology, but are not in imminent danger of being replaced by it. It may prove beneficial for the hotel to provide some training for older members of staff to keep up with technological developments. This study could prove useful to service providers who aim to gain competitive advantage by elevating their level of guest service to exceed guest expectations through emulating the personalised service that the concierge can offer.

Social implications

The socio-cultural issues within this study are important. Internet technology is generally perceived to be the panacea of all contemporary communication ills in the twenty-first century. The authors however propose that the concierge is the last bastion of front-line service personnel who are still approached for their individual, sometimes unique, knowledge that cannot be found online.

Originality/value

This study contributes to an area of interest that lacks contemporary research due to the natural gatekeeping that occurs within this “closed” environment.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Loyd S. Pettegrew

Health care organizational research should pay greater attention to the specific settings where health is practiced. An ethnographic account of humor, ritual and defiance…

Abstract

Purpose

Health care organizational research should pay greater attention to the specific settings where health is practiced. An ethnographic account of humor, ritual and defiance is presented from 29 months spent in a private, concierge-type radiation oncology center. A thick description of the setting and interaction among center staff and patients is offered in an attempt to establish why qualitative research of health care settings is so important. Findings are compared to Ellingson’s work on health care setting. Humor, ritual and defiance have therapeutic value and deserve greater attention in cancer treatment centers and health care organizations more broadly. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic account of humor, ritual and defiance is presented from 29 months spent in a private, concierge-type radiation oncology center through thick description.

Findings

This study reinforces the literature on the value of institutionalizing humor and ritual to improve patients’ experience in cancer care given the dominance of large public institutions, most easily accessed by academic researchers. Suncoast Coast Radiation Center’s “institutionalized humor” is an important finding that should be examine further. Scholarship can also illuminate the use of ritual in settings where health care is practiced.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to a particular research setting which is a private, concierge care radiation oncology treatment center in the Southeastern USA.

Practical implications

Cancer care centers should consider carefully institutionalizing humor and ritual into their daily practices. Further, patient defiance should be reinterpreted not as a patient deficiency but as a therapeutic coping mechanism by patients.

Social implications

While nearly half of cancer care in the USA is offered in private, for-profit institutions, the vast majority of the understanding of cancer care comes only from non-profit and government-run institutions. Shining a light of these neglected cancer care settings will add to the understanding and the ability to improve the care offered to patients.

Originality/value

This is the first health ethnography in a concierge care, cancer care treatment setting. It tests the proposition that humor, ritual and defiance play an important role in a private concierge cancer care organization.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Matthew R. Griffis

One of the library’s most enduring roles has been information provision. It remains especially important today as libraries transition from passive storehouses of books…

Abstract

One of the library’s most enduring roles has been information provision. It remains especially important today as libraries transition from passive storehouses of books into active community living rooms that offer not just information but a variety of different user experiences. Some libraries have responded by implementing new approaches to information provision that appear to fit this new vision. One such approach is roving information service. Using portable forms of information technology for assistance, librarians now roam the library floor, meeting users where they are rather than the other way around. Its advocates laud its flexibility and user-centeredness. But do roving models support this new, user-centered vision of the library? The answer lies in a deeper understanding of the library floor as a social space and how roving models of service affect perceptions of “centeredness” within it. This report reviews the results of an exploratory, qualitative study involving three libraries: two that use a hybrid model of roving service and one library that uses a fully roving model. The study’s findings indicate that indeed roving service can help create user-centered forms of library space, but a library’s method of implementation will matter.

Details

Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Brett Trusko

A common misconception about innovation is that the innovation process lacks pragmatism. Innovation professionals use soft concepts applied in fuzzy ways with too much…

Abstract

A common misconception about innovation is that the innovation process lacks pragmatism. Innovation professionals use soft concepts applied in fuzzy ways with too much emphasis on unproven approaches to solving problems. Perhaps because of the unconventional approaches taken by practitioners of innovation, business executives have generally segregated innovators from main stream operations, recognizing the importance of innovation, but not comfortable with the approach that innovation professionals often employ in getting to their ends. This paper discusses an approach to innovation that has the ability to firmly tie the strategy, mission or vision of the organization to the innovation process. An approach that allows you to take the “Universal Intentions” (mission, vision, goals objectives or strategies) to an iterative process that allows innovation iteration to optimization of a process.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Omar Parvaiz and Elliott N. Weiss

Progressive Insurance Company is considering the rollout of a new level of service in the Maryland area. Students are given the opportunity to understand the new service…

Abstract

Progressive Insurance Company is considering the rollout of a new level of service in the Maryland area. Students are given the opportunity to understand the new service and assess its fit with Progressive's business. Students must also determine a staffing plan for the new center.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Georgina Lukanova and Galina Ilieva

Purpose: This paper presents a review of the current state and potential capabilities for application of robots, artificial intelligence and automated services (RAISA) in…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper presents a review of the current state and potential capabilities for application of robots, artificial intelligence and automated services (RAISA) in hotel companies.

Design/methodology/approach: A two-step approach was applied in this study. First, the authors make a theoretical overview of the robots, artificial intelligence and service automation (RAISA) in hotels. Second, the authors make a detailed overview of various case studies from global hotel practice.

Findings: The application of RAISA in hotel companies is examined in connection with the impact that technology has on guest experience during each of the five stages of the guest cycle: pre-arrival, arrival, stay, departure, assessment.

Research implications: Its implications can be searched with respect to future research. It deals with topics such as how different generations (guests and employees) perceive RAISA in the hotel industry and what is the attitude of guests in different categories of hotels (luxury and economy) towards the use of RAISA. It also shows what is the attitude of different types of tourists (holiday, business, health, cultural, etc.) and what kinds of robots (androids or machines) are more appropriate for different types of hotel operations.

Practical implications: The implications are related to the improvement of operations and operational management, marketing and sales, enhancement of customer experience and service innovation, training and management.

Originality/value: This book chapter complements and expands research on the role of RAISA in the hotel industry and makes some projections about the use of technologies in the future.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Jennifer Gunter King

– The purpose of this paper is to share a compelling example of a library’s willingness to develop and design itself as an open-ended process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share a compelling example of a library’s willingness to develop and design itself as an open-ended process.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study provides a historical review of the library’s founding design, and an overview of the process and approach to redesign. The study contextualizes the library within current academic library research and literature.

Findings

This paper explores the research, engagement and planning process behind the library’s exploration of new models and service configurations. The project was an engaged, inclusive, transparent, library-led process. The commons reestablishes the library as the “nerve center” of the campus.

Originality/value

The paper offers an update to a 1969 report, and later book by Robert Taylor on the Harold F. Johnson Library at Hampshire College, designed as a prototype of an academic library. This paper will be of value to academic librarians, administrators, and historians.

Details

Library Management, vol. 37 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Neil Quinn and Hannah Biggs

There are significant inequalities in mental health, with mental health problems and poor mental health more common in areas of deprivation. Current policy in Scotland…

Abstract

There are significant inequalities in mental health, with mental health problems and poor mental health more common in areas of deprivation. Current policy in Scotland acknowledges the impact of social and environmental factors on community mental health and well‐being and the need for public mental health to engage with regeneration initiatives. This study, based in a low‐income community in east Glasgow, assesses what factors influence community mental health and well‐being and how to develop par tnerships to address these issues. It involved a workshop with community planning agencies and residents' groups in east Glasgow, an action research project with local residents and a validation event with local residents. The study found that social circumstances influenced mental health and well‐being, with people having concerns about their neighbourhood and environment, with antisocial behaviour emerging as a major factor contributing to residents feeling unsafe, isolated and unhappy living in the area. At the same time, residents talked a lot about how happy they felt about the community they were par t of and the impor tant role that social capital can play in low‐income areas in promoting well‐being. The study also highlights the need for par tnerships between health and other sectors and the impor tance of ensuring multi‐agency working that embeds public mental health within the agendas of housing and regeneration sectors. Finally, it demonstrates that action research between par tner agencies and communities will be more effective in identifying key issues and that within such a process, there is more likely to be ‘buy in’ from these agencies to bring about social change.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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