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3560

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

James Lloyd Bierstaker

The purpose of this paper is to examine differences in managers' and employees' attitudes about fraud across different cultures, provide some theories as to why these…

7402

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine differences in managers' and employees' attitudes about fraud across different cultures, provide some theories as to why these differences exist, give some recent examples of cultural differences in ethical perceptions from practice, make recommendations as to how companies can address this issue and make improvements to their anti‐fraud programs based on the country and culture in which they operate, and suggest some opportunities for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

A great deal of future research is needed to examine the effects of culture on the critical elements of managements' antifraud programs and controls that may be most effective in combating corruption, including the whistleblower hotline, internal audit, surprise audits, management review of internal controls, rewards for whistleblowers, and mandatory job rotation.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers reviewing the literature on cross‐cultural fraud and identifying opportunities for future research.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Christopher J. Skousen and Brady James Twedt

The purpose of this research is to determine the likelihood of financial statement manipulations in companies throughout a variety of emerging market countries and compare…

2054

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to determine the likelihood of financial statement manipulations in companies throughout a variety of emerging market countries and compare this potential wirh that of firms within the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilize the Fraud Score Model, as set forth by Dechow et al., to determine the likelihood of financial statement manipulations. By adjusting their model to work in an international setting, the authors are able to study nine industries across 23 countries, including the USA.

Findings

The results vary from industry to industry, with some countries performing extremely well in one industry, only to prove remarkably risky in the next.

Originality/value

The findings may be used by a variety of market participants, especially investors, to determine the risk levels of potential foreign investments. Therefore, this research can help lead to a more overall efficient placement of global capital.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

John Hooker

Because cultures operate in very different ways, different activities are corrupting in different parts of the world. Taking the view that corruption is an activity that…

12621

Abstract

Purpose

Because cultures operate in very different ways, different activities are corrupting in different parts of the world. Taking the view that corruption is an activity that tends to undermine a cultural system, this paper aims to examine this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes real‐life situations in Japan, Taiwan, India, China, North America, sub‐Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and Korea to distinguish actions that structurally undermine a cultural system from those that are merely inefficient or are actually supportive.

Findings

Cultures have fundamentally different behavioral norms due to their different conceptions of human nature. They can be broadly classified as rule‐based and relationship‐based, distinguished by the fact that behavior is regulated primarily by respect for rules in the former and authority figures in the latter. Corrupting behavior differs around the world partly because of different norms, and partly because cultural systems break down in different ways. Activities such as nepotism or cronyism that are corrupting in the rule‐based cultures of the West may be functional in relationship‐based cultures. Behavior that is normal in the West, such as bringing lawsuits or adhering strictly to a contract, may be corrupting elsewhere. Practices such as bribery that are often corrupting across cultures are nonetheless corrupting for very different reasons.

Originality/value

The paper provides culturally sensitive guidelines not only for avoiding corruption but also for understanding the mechanisms that make a culture work.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Rajib Sanyal and Turgut Guvenli

This paper seeks to examine the extent to which national cultural characteristics impact the propensity of firms based in the country to engage in bribery to gain…

4142

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the extent to which national cultural characteristics impact the propensity of firms based in the country to engage in bribery to gain advantages when conducting business overseas.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of statistical analyses – bivariate correlations and regression – was performed on data for five cultural variables and one economic variable for 30 countries to ascertain the relationship between these variables on a country's Bribe Payers Index, a measure of bribe giving.

Findings

The results indicate that firms from countries low on power distance or long‐term orientation, or high on individualism, are less likely to engage in bribe giving. However, when the level of economic development in the home country as measured by per capita income is included, the impact of cultural factors is muted considerably. Firms from high‐income countries are less likely to give bribes.

Research limitations/implications

Richer countries are likely to have certain practices that create a business ethos where bribing is the exception, not the rule, in conducting business. The study is based on a one‐time sample of just 30 countries for which bribe‐giving data are available. The data culture is limited to the countries studied by Hofstede.

Practical implications

Bribery is less a cultural phenomenon; instead, it is bred in poverty and illustrative of business behavior occurring in a highly regulated and inward‐looking economy. As a country prospers and the domestic operating environment becomes more hygienic, it will have a salutary effect on the international behavior of the firms based in that country.

Originality/value

The study mediates the debate between cultural and economic determinism and provides empirical evidence that bribe‐giving is largely an expression of economic imperatives and not cultural predisposition.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Richard G. Brody and Robert Luo

This paper sets out to discuss white‐collar crime and fraud in China and to draw implications for Western businesses wishing to enter the Chinese market.

2462

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to discuss white‐collar crime and fraud in China and to draw implications for Western businesses wishing to enter the Chinese market.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides examples of recent frauds committed in China and also provides a brief review of the literature. It traces the development of China's economy, describing China's modern‐day economy, and also looks at cultural issues and differences between Western and Chinese attitudes.

Findings

Western businesses planning to enter the Chinese market need to do their due diligence before committing resources. What works in Western society may not work in another culture, like China's. However, gaining an understanding of the culture and general way of life will go a long way towards laying the groundwork for success.

Research limitations/implications

Additional focus should be placed on examining how cultural differences affect judgments and behaviors.

Originality/value

From a practical standpoint, the paper provides insights into possible areas of disagreement between employees from different cultures that can result from their divergent opinions about individuals' responsibility for fraudulent acts.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Tanja Rabl and Torsten M. Kühlmann

The literature states that rationalization strategies contribute to a spread of corruption in organizations. They are supposed to serve not only as post hoc justifications…

3548

Abstract

Purpose

The literature states that rationalization strategies contribute to a spread of corruption in organizations. They are supposed to serve not only as post hoc justifications but also as ex ante determinants of corrupt behavior. This empirical study aims at challenging this theoretical assumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gained empirical data in a business simulation game where participants had the opportunity to act corruptly. The sample included both university and high school students.

Findings

The results show that post hoc rationalizations primarily highlight the “positive” intention behind corrupt action. As relationships with important person‐based determinants of corruption are lacking, it is questionable whether rationalization strategies possess potential as ex ante determinants of corrupt behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The design of the study only assesses rationalization strategies post hoc. Therefore it does not allow for examining causal effects, only the investigation of relationships. Future research should aim at addressing this issue, including both ex ante and post hoc assessment of rationalization strategies.

Originality/value

The paper is a first attempt to examine empirically the function of rationalization strategies in the context of corruption in organizations.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

135

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Chad Albrecht, Conan Albrecht and Shay Tzafrir

The purpose of this paper is to present and explain the identity theft cycle. The identity theft cycle explains how a perpetrator goes through various stages of confidence…

3148

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and explain the identity theft cycle. The identity theft cycle explains how a perpetrator goes through various stages of confidence and experimentation when stealing an individual's identity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a conceptual approach by first describing identity theft in detail and then discussing the seriousness of identity theft for consumers today. The paper then presents and explains the identity theft cycle in greater detail including the stages of discovery, action, and trial.

Findings

The paper provides evidence to suggest that if identity theft is detected early, consumers can protect themselves from the vast and difficult consequences of identity theft.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an important area of research by providing basic information about the nature of identity theft. This paper also discusses the various ways that perpetrators steal consumers' information, as well as teaches consumers how to proactively protect themselves from identity theft.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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