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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Mark Ebers and Manfred Lieb

The favourable prospects of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM)are widely recognised. Based on a case study and relevant literaturesome of the risks associated with…

Abstract

The favourable prospects of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) are widely recognised. Based on a case study and relevant literature some of the risks associated with CIM are outlined. It is argued that the technological orientation of the CIM vision unwarrantably underestimates organisational and social problems of implementing and applying computerised manufacturing systems. Specifically, it is shown how disregard of uncertainty and of applicants′ divergent motivations may lead to serious friction. The attempt to realise the CIM vision may trigger a social dynamic which impedes the realisation of potential results. Finally, several implications of the research are described.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Yunus Kathawala, Sudhir Chawla and Dean Elmuti

Focuses on computer‐integrated manufacturing′s macro aspects andits strategic implications. Defines CIM at the macro and micro level andthe various factors that strongly…

Abstract

Focuses on computer‐integrated manufacturing′s macro aspects and its strategic implications. Defines CIM at the macro and micro level and the various factors that strongly call for the implementation of CIM. After going into the advantages, concludes with implications for the future.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1991

David Lei and Joel D. Goldhar

The transformation of US manufacturing, led by computer‐integratedmanufacturing (CIM) systems, has already begun to take root. Thisarticle examines the potential benefits…

Abstract

The transformation of US manufacturing, led by computer‐integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems, has already begun to take root. This article examines the potential benefits to firms which understand and can exploit CIM technology to its fullest extent. Because CIM simultaneously provides high product variety with low costs, conventional assumptions about competitive strategy and organisation design need reevaluation. As companies must work with increasingly scarce capital, human resources and time, CIM becomes an attractive option not only for highly capital‐intensive industries such as automobiles, but also for fast‐changing areas such as textiles, fashion design, and consumer appliances. CIM combines the benefits of economies of scope with the scale economies traditionally garnered only with large, rigid and dedicated factories. Success with CIM and other new manufacturing technologies depends on new organisational designs and incentives that foster fast innovation and cross‐functional integration. CIM′s promising role in transforming the manufacturing firm into a service business across many different industries will spur many US firms′ efforts to enter a global marketplace.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 11 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

R.J. Boaden and B.G. Dale

In recent times data processing systems have become increasingly powerful and rapid advances have been made in machining and processing technologies. Growth in materials…

Abstract

In recent times data processing systems have become increasingly powerful and rapid advances have been made in machining and processing technologies. Growth in materials requirements planning (MRP) and computer‐aided design (CAD) has developed in parallel but independent of the advanced manufacturing technology stream. If organisations are to reduce their reaction time to customers’ orders and to provide a truly flexible service these two main streams must be brought together. This is likely to occur through computer‐integrated manufacturing (CIM). An analysis of the various definitions of CIM is given and implies that there is no single “right” definition which can be applied to any organisation. However there are certain principles which apply to definitions of CIM and an attempt is made to highlight these principles. CIM is not limited to the manufacturing function. It must be an overall concept that takes account of every aspect of the business, tying all aspects and organisational functions together into an integrated system, where all necessary data can be accessed easily by those who need them. CIM does not necessarily mean total computerisation but computers and software will play a major part.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Stuart Smith, David Tranfield, Clive Ley, John Bessant and Paul Levy

The article argues that many of the difficulties encountered inexploiting computer‐integrated technologies result from their beingimplemented as part of an attempt to…

Abstract

The article argues that many of the difficulties encountered in exploiting computer‐integrated technologies result from their being implemented as part of an attempt to change from a mass production to a flexible manufacturing paradigm. It is further argued that this also requires changes in the organisational paradigm in order to create a social system capable of supporting flexible manufacturing. Results of a study of 28 companies and 46 applications of computer‐integrated technologies are reported showing that there are widespread changes in organisation at the levels of work, management and inter‐organisational relationships. The empirical findings support the argument of a paradigm shift and detail the organisational dimensions on which this is taking place.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Nourredine Boubekri, Mehmet Dedeoglu and Hesham Eldeeb

New standards for communications, data exchange, and computerintegrated manufacturing systems are being implemented. These newstandards and methods of production are not…

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1105

Abstract

New standards for communications, data exchange, and computer integrated manufacturing systems are being implemented. These new standards and methods of production are not always compatible with existing machines and equipment. Studies show that significant investments would be required to replace the existing machines with new ones complying with the new standards. Describes a case study demonstrating that the implementation of an integrated manufacturing cell using equipment not conforming to high level communications standards is feasible. Also presents a review of computer integrated manufacturing technologies.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Glenn Hardaker and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

Highlights similarities, as well as differences, between Europeanand Japanese approaches to implementing computer‐integratedmanufacturing (CIM), and is based on research…

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1589

Abstract

Highlights similarities, as well as differences, between European and Japanese approaches to implementing computer‐integrated manufacturing (CIM), and is based on research which uses the 7S model, developed by McKinsey & Co., as an underlying framework. Considers a number of pertinent factors which were employed to define a sample frame: first, to judge the influence of CIM on world‐class manufacturing organizations, researches manufacturing companies in key developed countries with an established manufacturing base; second, emphasizes the impact of CIM on profit‐seeking businesses; third, as the survey assessed the integration of leading‐edge technology, the sample of manufacturing organizations comprised technology‐driven companies.

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European Business Review, vol. 95 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Jack Arthur Gowan and Richard G. Mathieu

“Turf Wars” between corporate management information systems (MIS) andcorporate manufacturing threaten the success of computer integratedmanufacturing (CIM). Co‐operation…

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2685

Abstract

“Turf Wars” between corporate management information systems (MIS) and corporate manufacturing threaten the success of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM). Co‐operation between MIS and manufacturing is essential in the planning, design and implementation of cross‐functional information systems, and it is information systems that are the biggest source of CIM failure. Takes the position that both MIS and manufacturing have been slow to recognize their contrasting corporate cultures and to deal with resolving the conflict between the two groups. In order to understand the conflict between MIS and manufacturing better, identifies the technical and organizational differences. From this, identifies seven “points of conflict” specific to identifying CIM implementation that are the focal point of the “turf wars”. Presents a framework for resolving the MIS/manufacturing conflict, based on prior research in organizational diversity. The goal is to resolve conflict by understanding and leveraging diversity, not by diminishing it. Proposes an empirical research agenda to test the framework. In conclusion, recommends collaborative research between the MIS and manufacturing communities to study the technical and organizational issues related to CIM.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 94 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

G. Anand and Rambabu Kodali

In recent years, many manufacturing companies are attempting to implement lean manufacturing systems (LMS) as an effective manufacturing strategy to survive in a highly…

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4672

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, many manufacturing companies are attempting to implement lean manufacturing systems (LMS) as an effective manufacturing strategy to survive in a highly competitive market. Such a process of selecting a suitable manufacturing system is highly complex and strategic in nature. The paper aims to how companies make a strategic decision of selecting LMS as part of their manufacturing strategy, and on what basis such strategic decisions are made by the managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a small‐ and medium‐sized enterprise is presented, in which the managers are contemplating on implementing either computer integrated manufacturing systems (CIMS) or LMS. To supplement the decision‐making process, a multi‐criteria decision making (MCDM) model, namely, the preference ranking organisation method for enrichment evaluations (PROMETHEE) is used to analyse how it will impact the stakeholders of the organisation, and the benefits gained.

Findings

An extensive analysis of PROMETHEE model revealed that LMS was the best for the given circumstances of the case.

Research limitations/implications

The same problem can be extended by incorporating the constraints (such as financial, technical, social) of the organisation by utilising an extended version of PROMETHEE called the PROMETHEE V. Since, a single case study approach has been utilised, the findings cannot be generalized for any other industry.

Practical limitations/implications

The methodology of PROMETHEE and its algorithm has been demonstrated in a detailed way and it is believed that it will be useful for managers to apply such MCDM tools to supplement their decision‐making efforts.

Originality/value

According to the authors’ knowledge there is no paper in the literature, which discusses the application of PROMETHEE in making a strategic decision of implementing LMS as a part of an organisation's manufacturing strategy.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Stephen Procter and Andrew D. Brown

Study of the integration of operations through the application of computer technologies has focused on the manufacturing sector. In looking at the difficulties found in…

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1004

Abstract

Study of the integration of operations through the application of computer technologies has focused on the manufacturing sector. In looking at the difficulties found in operating these technologies, increasing emphasis is being placed on their organizational aspects. These have been examined in depth by Ebers and Lieb, who concentrate on the social processes in implementation and the effects of reducing organizational slack. Applies this framework to the integration of information systems in a UK hospital. Examines the effects of integration: the new system is circumvented and organizational slack is redistributed as well as removed. Shows the importance of the cultural differences underlying the social processes between those introducing and those using the system, as well as within each of these groups. The framework of analysis provided by Ebers and Lieb thus proves to be quite robust. Concludes that our concern should not be computer‐integrated manufacturing but computer‐integrated operations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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