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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Dena J. Heathman and Brian H. Kleiner

Many companies are finding that to compete in their industries,continuous training of their employees is necessary. Although there arebarriers to be overcome computer

Abstract

Many companies are finding that to compete in their industries, continuous training of their employees is necessary. Although there are barriers to be overcome computer aided training can offer effective solutions as part of a company′s overall training programme. Telecommunications will be used to provide an exchange of information in an educational context; artificial intelligence technology will make interactive training sessions more realistic; computers will be used to train employees in interpersonal skills; performance support systems will bring training to the exact place and time that an employee needs instruction.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1977

ROGER MILES

Though the voices are much less strident than in the 1960s, we still hear some very bold assertions of the computer's potential as a training aid. These often come from…

Abstract

Though the voices are much less strident than in the 1960s, we still hear some very bold assertions of the computer's potential as a training aid. These often come from computer enthusiasts, psychologists speculating on the practical value of their research and, particularly more recently, from computer manufacturers looking for new markets. Fortunately for the training manager, there is now more experience of computers in action as aids to teaching and learning, evidence to help him judge these claims and decide on the computer's relevance to his own situation. However, he will frequently have to extrapolate from educational or military training applications, because there are relatively few examples of industrial or commercial uses. Even in the USA, which has led the development and use of this particular instructional technology, the bulk of the work has an educational purpose.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 9 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2007

Ji‐Hye Park and Tim Wentling

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of factors associated with e‐learning, particularly computer attitudes and usability, on transfer of training in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of factors associated with e‐learning, particularly computer attitudes and usability, on transfer of training in workplace e‐learning courses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study relied on quantitative data obtained from four online survey questionnaires. The sample of this study was 47 learners who took either one soft‐skill e‐learning course or one hard‐skill e‐learning course in a selected company and their supervisors.

Findings

The results demonstrated that learners' computer attitudes impact their perception of the usability of the e‐learning courses, and that this perception influences the degree of their transfer of training. The results imply that when learners come to an e‐learning class with positive attitudes toward computers, they feel the e‐learning course system to be more satisfactory and efficient, and accordingly they can better transfer what they have learned to job performance.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of this study is limited. Further research studies with various learners should be conducted. Additionally, the measure of transfer merely relied on their perception of it. Further studies should give more attention to the multifaceted measures of the actual transfer. Finally, further research should be conducted to examine other general factors pertaining to the transfer of training in e‐learning settings in addition to computer attitudes and usability.

Originality/value

The study expands the knowledge base regarding transfer of training by focusing on e‐learning, which is rapidly growing and receiving great attention in the workplace, and thus contributes to the establishment of a more comprehensive model of transfer of training.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Tien‐Chen Chien

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of system and instructor factors on e‐learning effectiveness under the interactions of computer self‐efficacy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of system and instructor factors on e‐learning effectiveness under the interactions of computer self‐efficacy. In this study, the factors of the e‐learning system are functionality, interaction, and response. The factors of the e‐learning instructor are attitude, technical skills, and instructional method. The moderating effects of learners' computer self‐efficacy are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveyed general employees in the financial services industry in Taiwan. A questionnaire was developed to measure participants' perceptions. Four hundred questionnaires were sent out, and 362 were returned. Of these, 314 were valid, leading to a return rate of 78.5 percent.

Findings

The results of data analysis indicate that both system and instructor factors have significant positive influences on e‐learning effectiveness. Learners' computer self‐efficacy has a moderating effect on the relationship between system functionality and training effectiveness. The higher the computer self‐efficacy, the stronger is the relationship between functionality and effectiveness, and vice versa. However, computer self‐efficacy does not have a significant moderating effect on the relationship between other independent variables and training effectiveness.

Originality/value

Since both system and instructor factors have positive influences on e‐learning effectiveness, HRD managers need to pay more attention to issues in both areas. High computer self‐efficacy can result in better training effectiveness; therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to enhancing employee computer skills and their confidence in using e‐learning.

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European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Thomas N. Garavan and Clare McCracken

Part 1 described the growth in end‐user computing and the problemswhich it presents for training and general computer literacy,highlighting a number of elements necessary…

Abstract

Part 1 described the growth in end‐user computing and the problems which it presents for training and general computer literacy, highlighting a number of elements necessary to achieve a basic level of computer literacy, i.e. awareness, skill and knowledge. Part 2 explores a number of other important issues. Specifically, focuses on learning style and end‐user training and proposes a general training model. Outlines a case‐study of end‐user computing in an academic environment.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Nalini Govindarajulu

Although end‐user computing (EUC) training has received significant attention among academics and practitioners, the effective transfer of trained EUC skills is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Although end‐user computing (EUC) training has received significant attention among academics and practitioners, the effective transfer of trained EUC skills is a relatively neglected issue. Analysis of factors affecting the EUC transfer process will aid in understanding and improving training transfer. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to underscore key trainee characteristics and facets of the work environment that influence EUC training transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework includes prior computer experience, computer anxiety, computer self‐efficacy, pre‐training motivation and perceived job utility as significant trainee factors influencing the EUC transfer process. In addition, the model includes supervisory support as an important constituent of the EUC transfer process.

Findings

The model highlights the mediating roles of computer self‐efficacy and pre‐training motivation in predicting motivation to transfer. In addition, it points out that several factors work simultaneously to influence motivation to transfer EUC training.

Practical implications

Supervisory support in the pre‐ and post‐training environment is extremely crucial in determining EUC training success. Specifically, supervisors should be able to communicate to employees the purpose and importance of training, the relevance of computer training to their jobs and the outcomes expected.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by emphasizing the importance of supervisory support and individual characteristics in predicting motivation to transfer.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Tor Söderström, Carina Lindgren and Gregory Neely

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the practical knowing that is central in police education. Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the practical knowing that is central in police education. Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning (e.g. Merleau-Ponty, 1945/1997; Polanyi, 1966; Argyris and Schön, 1974) as well as empirical examples, this paper discusses the design of and what can be expected from computer simulation training for the development of police students’ professional knowing.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion is based on lessons learned from working with two different computer simulation training situations designed to prepare the students for an upcoming practical training by facilitating the understanding of complex situations as they should be handled in the physical training situation.

Findings

The experiences from the training sessions showed that the different characteristics of the simulations mediate how the training session was performed, e.g., unplanned trial and error vs focused and attentive, but also group discussions about how to act and appropriate actions in relation to the situation to be solved in the simulation.

Originality/value

Based on the lessons learned from working with the two different computer simulations, it is posited that the use of computer simulations for practical scenario training is a complex endeavor that needs, in various degrees, to be supported by pedagogical steering. The design of computer simulation training (both the simulation and how the training is designed and performed) need to consider the specific aspects that surround tacit knowledge and embodied learning in the “real sense” (anchored to the practical training) to be of relevance for police students development of professional knowing.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1983

FRANK JONES

There have been various articles and news items in the training press about the application of new computer technology to training. Most of these have emphasised the…

Abstract

There have been various articles and news items in the training press about the application of new computer technology to training. Most of these have emphasised the hardware element. By this I mean what the equipment is and an excessive concentration on the superficial impression given by the initial impact. We have all read that video disks can provide immediate access to a still frame anywhere on the disks and that the quality is fantastic but nobody seems to be answering the question, how do I go about trying it out, or maybe is it really a commercial idea for me anyway? Video disks are only one aspect because the new technology includes a whole range of communications equipment. The clue to the likely training applications is the computer: a word which strikes terror into the heart of many otherwise confident human beings. This is a new series of articles aimed at the practical training and education practitioner who wants to know more about the applications of the new technology with a view to having a go.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Leela Hebbar

This paper aims to examine the impact of vocational training on unemployed workers not typically studied: women enrolled in engineering or computer programming training

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of vocational training on unemployed workers not typically studied: women enrolled in engineering or computer programming training and high school dropouts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from New Jersey's Individual Training Grant (ITG) program and a quasi‐experimental design, the study compares the ITG groups' re‐employment and wage recovery rates with a matched comparison group.

Findings

The article finds that women enrolled in the male‐dominated fields of engineering or computer programming experience re‐employment rates that are lower than or similar to those in the comparison group, but they experience higher wage recovery in 8th and 12th quarters after claiming unemployment insurance (UI). Hispanic high school dropouts experience both higher re‐employment and wage recovery rates than their comparison group, but the wage recovery advantage disappears when those enrolled in truck driving training are removed from the sample. Further, white and black high school dropouts experience no re‐employment or wage recovery advantage. For all participants, the study finds participants experience a higher re‐employment rate than the comparison group beginning in the fifth quarter and experience no wage recovery advantage.

Research limitations/implications

To address the concern of selection bias, a difference‐in‐difference wage model controls for time‐variant differences in unobservables and an employment regression model controls for remaining differences in the matching variables.

Practical implications

These results suggest that training improves re‐employment chances and that type of training matters with respect to wage recovery. In this sample, those enrolled in truck driving training, engineering, and computer programming tended to experience higher wage recovery than their comparison group.

Originality/value

This paper examines the impact of vocational training on unemployed workers not typically studied.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Joanne C. Preston and Karen E. Chappell

The effectiveness of three training methods in teaching managersleadership principles are examined. Forty‐two male and femaleIntroductory Psychology students were randomly…

Abstract

The effectiveness of three training methods in teaching managers leadership principles are examined. Forty‐two male and female Introductory Psychology students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: computer‐based training (CBT), computer‐based training with videotaped vignettes (CBTV), or group‐based workshop training with videotaped vignettes (GBW). The dependent variables of conceptual and applied knowledge assessed the training effectiveness. Pre‐test/post‐test scores evaluated conceptual knowledge while an assessment centre technique using the dimensions of delegation, management control, influencing, and sensitivity on Ss answers to a problem‐solving question measured the pre‐test/post‐test scores in applied knowledge. The results demonstrated that organisations could choose leadership training based on cost‐effectiveness considerations without having to sacrifice training results. Further confirmatory research is needed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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