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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Wei Zhou, David Heesom, Panagiotis Georgakis and Joseph H.M. Tah

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the CSCW in collaborative 4D modelling and its user interface (UI)/interaction designs for prototyping. Four-dimensional (4D…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the CSCW in collaborative 4D modelling and its user interface (UI)/interaction designs for prototyping. Four-dimensional (4D) modelling technology has potentials to integrate geographically dispersed planners to achieve collaborative construction planning. However, applying this technology in teamwork remains a challenge in computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW).

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted user-centred design (UCD) methodology to investigate a usable 4D collaboration prototype through analysis, design and usability testing. By applying CSCW theories, it first clarified the meaning of 4D CSCW to formulate design propositions as design target. By leveraging UCD theories, subsequently, the first-stage research sought an optimal standalone 4D modelling prototype following a parallel design approach. At the second stage, it further investigated into a collaborative 4D modelling prototype using an iterative design. It adopted collaborative task analysis into the UI/interaction design extension for a collaborative prototype based on results obtained from the first stage. The final usability testing was performed on the collaborative prototype to evaluate the designed CSCW and UI in a controlled geographically dispersed teamwork situation.

Findings

The test results and user feedback verified their usability. It also disclosed design weaknesses in collaborators’ awareness and smooth tasks’ transitions for further enhancement.

Originality/value

The combination of CSCW and UCD theories is practical for designing collaborative 4D modelling. It can also benefit designs for collaborative modelling in other dimensions like cost analysis, sustainable design, facility management, etc. in building information modelling.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

David M. Nichols and Michael B. Twidale

This paper describes how an area of computer science research, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, can be applied to world of libraries. Collaborative activities can be…

Abstract

This paper describes how an area of computer science research, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, can be applied to world of libraries. Collaborative activities can be described by whether they occur in the same time and in the same place. These activities can be broadly arranged into three groups depending on the participants: staff‐staff, user‐staff and user‐user interactions. Applying computer technology to these activities requires careful consideration of the work practices involved and the costs and benefits of any changes.

Details

VINE, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Susan Turner and Phil Turner

This paper sets out to highlight conclusions from computersupported cooperative work (CSCW) research, which are relevant to e‐learning environments, in this case, WebCT.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to highlight conclusions from computersupported cooperative work (CSCW) research, which are relevant to e‐learning environments, in this case, WebCT.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the CSCW literature and identifies the main findings relating to the use and acceptance of collaborative technologies. These findings are applied to the analysis of 65 free‐form accounts of the use of WebCT obtained from student users in a higher education institution.

Findings

The challenges to cooperative work tools widely demonstrated within the CSCW research community since the early 1990s are alive and well in the context of e‐learning technology more than ten years later. In particular, there is strong evidence of discrepancies in benefits for different stakeholders, the need for a critical mass of users, and problems with lack of fit with social norms.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions are based on computing students from one institution, but there is no reason to believe that the sample is atypical.

Practical implications

The conclusions identify a need for stakeholder involvement in the introduction of e‐learning environments in the tradition of participative design.

Originality/value

The paper brings well‐established findings from the CSCW community to the e‐learning domain.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Andrew Clemmet

Computer supported collaborative working (CSCW) is an extension to groupware computing which recognizes that there is a need to go further than supporting existing ways of…

Abstract

Computer supported collaborative working (CSCW) is an extension to groupware computing which recognizes that there is a need to go further than supporting existing ways of working by using technology to underpin innovative forms of work organization and practice. Outlines the government‐backed initiative to raise the awareness of CSCW and briefly describes the exemplar projects being funded under the initiative.

Details

Work Study, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Hugo Fuks and Rodrigo Lemos de Assis

Questions related to perception in groupware systems have received a lot of attention in recent Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) studies. This paper presents a…

Abstract

Questions related to perception in groupware systems have received a lot of attention in recent Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) studies. This paper presents a model of support of perception for a groupware approach based upon communication, coordination and cooperation. The suggested model is applied through learningware technology. The AulaNet learning environment was used as a source of experiences for development of the proposed model. The conception of a new service, implemented on AulaNet to illustrate the utilization of perception information, also is presented. Some of the problems that have been encountered, questions of implementation and difficulties derived from the addition of new functionalities, are highlighted throughout the paper.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Steve Benford, Adrian Bullock, Paul Harvey, Howidy Howidy, Alan Shepherd and Hugh Smith

Describes the Grace Project, its goals and scope. The aim of Graceis to build distributed group communications tools within an OpenSystems Interconnection (OSI) networking…

Abstract

Describes the Grace Project, its goals and scope. The aim of Grace is to build distributed group communications tools within an Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) networking environment. Grace provides the foundations for a globally distributed system for cooperative working based on information sharing within activity and organizational domains. Introduces a conceptual model of group communications derived from analysing sample activities. Outlines architecture of Grace and explains the use of existing OSI services. Examines two prototype activities: a Help desk in detail and Computer Conferencing in outline. Discusses the implications of trying to control the access to the above type of tools. Briefly describes the status of group communications standardization.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Amina Aouine, Latifa Mahdaoui and Laurent Moccozet

The purpose of this paper is to focus on assessing individuals’ problems in learning groups/teams and should lead to the assessment of the group/team itself as a learning entity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on assessing individuals’ problems in learning groups/teams and should lead to the assessment of the group/team itself as a learning entity.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, an extension of the IMS-Learning Design (IMS-LD) meta-model is proposed in order to support the assessment of collaborative activities in e-learning. Besides, the software architecture which consists of a set of components forming a web wizard to create, track and assess the collaborative assessment processes is described as to support that extension of the IMS-LD meta-model.

Findings

With the proposed solution we can: make assessment fairer using individual and collective assessment indicators to assign final scores to learners; make an assessment step by step for better individual and collective monitoring activities; and divide the assessment into lighter phases for the correctors. Consequently, the evaluator will have more detailed information about his/her students and the quality of judgment will be better. This could also be useful for the evaluator in order to plan further examinations.

Research limitations/implications

Further experimentations are necessary to test the effectiveness of the proposed system in order to analyze its performances under a massive usage. In addition, the authors plan to use a survey to collect learners’ opinions to know the effectiveness of the proposal in terms of fairness in the assessment of collaborative activities in an online community.

Originality/value

This paper addresses important issues in the educational area, especially assessment of collaborative activities. In fact, to reduce subjectivity and increase fairness in assessing learners in collaborative work, for example, using the peer assessment, in order to try reducing subjectivity and fairly assessing learners. However, while assessing group work, the same mark is attributed for all group members and authors have concluded that it is not the right approach to make a fair and more objective assessment.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Chirag Shah

Collaboration is often required for activities that are too complex or difficult to be dealt with by a single individual. Many situations requiring information-seeking…

Abstract

Collaboration is often required for activities that are too complex or difficult to be dealt with by a single individual. Many situations requiring information-seeking activities also call for people to work together. Often the methods, systems, and tools that provide access to information assume that they are used only by individuals working on their tasks alone. This review points to the need to acknowledge the importance of collaboration in information-seeking processes, to study models, and to develop systems that are specifically designed to enable collaborative information seeking (CIS) tasks. This chapter reviews the literature from various domains including library and information science, human–computer interaction, collaborative systems, and information retrieval. Focus of the review is on the extent to which people work together on information seeking tasks and the systems and tools that are available for them to be successful. Since CIS occurs in the broader context of collaboration in general, a review of literature about collaborations is first undertaken to define it and place it into context with related terms such as cooperation and communication. A more focused review of research follows relating CIS to systems that have attempted to support such interactions. Included are identification and synthesis of a number of core issues in the field and how best to evaluate systems and collaborative tools. Key lessons learned from the review are summarized, and gaps in the literature identified to spur future research and study.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-979-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Robert Howard

The first‐ever conference on “computersupported cooperative work” (CSCW) defined a new perspective and perhaps even a new speciality in the field of computer science. The…

Abstract

The first‐ever conference on “computersupported cooperative work” (CSCW) defined a new perspective and perhaps even a new speciality in the field of computer science. The fundamental insight is that, with very few exceptions, our work does not take place in isolation but, rather, is embedded in a multiplicity of social contexts. And this, obviously, has enormous implications for how information technology is conceived and designed.

Details

Office Technology and People, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0167-5710

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