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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2007

Michael J. Handel

A leading explanation for the growth of wage inequality is that greater use of information technology increased the demand for human capital. This paper identifies four…

Abstract

A leading explanation for the growth of wage inequality is that greater use of information technology increased the demand for human capital. This paper identifies four different explanations for the relationships between computers, skills, and wages: computer-specific human capital, greater general human capital among computer users, greater general human capital for both users and nonusers due to contextual effects, and skill-biased changes in the job composition of the workforce. The paper tests the first three explanations and finds little support for them once pre-computer and other job characteristics are adequately controlled. This conclusion receives further support from a comparison of the timing of inequality growth and computer diffusion and from analyses of the contribution of computer use to overall inequality growth using DiNardo, Fortin, and Lemieux's (1996) reweighting standardization technique.

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Aspects of Worker Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-473-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

David Bawden

The concepts of ‘information literacy’ and ‘digital literacy’ are described, and reviewed, by way of a literature survey and analysis. Related concepts, including computer

Abstract

The concepts of ‘information literacy’ and ‘digital literacy’ are described, and reviewed, by way of a literature survey and analysis. Related concepts, including computer literacy, library literacy, network literacy, Internet literacy and hyper‐literacy are also discussed, and their relationships elucidated. After a general introduction, the paper begins with the basic concept of ‘literacy’, which is then expanded to include newer forms of literacy, more suitable for complex information environments. Some of these, for example library, media and computer literacies, are based largely on specific skills, but have some extension beyond them. They lead togeneral concepts, such as information literacy and digital literacy which are based on knowledge, perceptions and attitudes, though reliant on the simpler skills‐based literacies

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Pernilla Gripenberg

IT related skills are vital for becoming and remaining a citizen in a digitally supported information society – also for adults who are no longer in school; do not use IT…

Abstract

Purpose

IT related skills are vital for becoming and remaining a citizen in a digitally supported information society – also for adults who are no longer in school; do not use IT in their work; are unemployed, self‐employed, or retired; or otherwise without the technical support, possibilities for training, and availability of a community of practice and “master users” that are common in organizational contexts. The paper aims to draw on literature on learning IT skills in the organizational context and to apply this in a non‐organizational, community context. The paper seeks to explore how individual IT‐skill and knowledge development could be supported using formal and informal learning strategies, including community services, training courses, information events, learning community and other learning mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is empirically grounded in a research and development project with 50 participating families who received a PC, printer, and internet connection, as well as training, technical support, and information events over a period of two years. Both qualitative and quantitative data were gathered throughout the project. Data are here analyzed as an extensive case study.

Findings

Based on experiences from the project the paper describes how “digital literacies” could be learned and supported and inclusion in the digital information society enhanced in practice. The paper develops a framework that shows how different learning strategies and mechanisms support different kinds of computer knowledge and skill areas; describes three interlinked areas of IT knowledge and skills; and suggests a number of practical implications on how computer self‐efficacy could be supported in a non‐organizational context.

Originality/value

The paper draws on extant knowledge about learning and developing IT‐skills in the organizational context, and applies this knowledge in a different context in order to explore how this knowledge can be used also outside organizations to support adults to be part of the digitally supported information society.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Esharenana E. Adomi and Silvester O. Anie

To assess the computer literacy skills/competencies of professional librarians in Nigerian university libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

To assess the computer literacy skills/competencies of professional librarians in Nigerian university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Employs descriptive design using questionnaires to collect data from 57 professional librarians in four Nigerian university libraries.

Findings

Reveals the personal characteristics of the respondents, assessment of their levels of computer skills, computer use experience, avenues of computer literacy, software used, library routines computer is used for, benefits derived from computer and problems associated with computer use, recommendations are made in light of the findings.

Originality/value

Its findings will assist librarians and library managers to have insight into state of computer literacy among professionals in Nigerian university libraries and assist relevant authorities to plan how librarians, especially in developing countries, can become computer literate.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Despo Ktoridou and Nikleia Eteokleous‐Grigoriou

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a 40‐hour computer course for beginners provided to a group of unemployed women learners with no/minimum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a 40‐hour computer course for beginners provided to a group of unemployed women learners with no/minimum computer literacy skills who can be characterized as digital immigrants. The aim of the study is to identify participants' perceptions and experiences regarding technology, any barriers and challenges faced throughout the computer course and the extent to which the computer course assisted them in becoming computer literate and employable. This case study was based on the European Commission's EQUAL program.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was employed making use of qualitative and quantitative data. Quantitative data were collected using three different questionnaires (the background questionnaire, the Loyd/Gressard Computer Attitude Scale questionnaire and the Computer Skills Tests questionnaire) and qualitative data were collected through two focus groups. A total of nine unemployed women with no/minimum computer literacy skills were the focus of investigation. The 40‐hour computer literacy course and the data collection process took place in May‐June 2007.

Findings

Results demonstrated the effectiveness and necessity of computer courses for digital immigrants. The participants developed an acceptable level of computer literacy skills and a more positive attitude towards technology. They further realized the importance of possessing computer literacy skills specifically in relation to their employability, professional path and career development. Their self‐esteem in relation to technology was also increased on professional, educational, and personal levels.

Originality/value

The study confirms the necessity to explore further instructional design and implementation of digital immigrants' education and training regarding computer technology.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Petr Lupač

Abstract

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Beyond the Digital Divide: Contextualizing the Information Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-548-7

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Hajar Safahieh and Asefeh Asemi

This paper aims to assess the level of computer literacy skills of librarians in the University of Isfahan, Iran and attempts to examine their avenue of computer literacy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the level of computer literacy skills of librarians in the University of Isfahan, Iran and attempts to examine their avenue of computer literacy, software used, benefits derived from computer and problems militating against effective usage of computers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a survey research approach to carry out this investigation.

Findings

The investigation reveals that the majority of the librarians do not yet possess a good level of computer skills and even their long duration experience of computer use has not necessarily improved their level of computer literacy.

Practical implications

The findings can be utilized by library managers in order to organize and offer regular training programmes to train or re‐train librarians with the latest advancement of information technology.

Originality/value

The paper provides insight into the state of computer literacy of librarians in one of the public universities in Iran. This shows the urgent need for the librarians to be adequately equipped with the computer skills to take advantage of all computerized library facilities.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Prashanth Rajivan, Pablo Moriano, Timothy Kelley and L. Jean Camp

The purpose of this study is to identify factors that determine computer and security expertise in end users. They can be significant determinants of human behaviour and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify factors that determine computer and security expertise in end users. They can be significant determinants of human behaviour and interactions in the security and privacy context. Standardized, externally valid instruments for measuring end-user security expertise are non-existent.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire encompassing skills and knowledge-based questions was developed to identify critical factors that constitute expertise in end users. Exploratory factor analysis was applied on the results from 898 participants from a wide range of populations. Cluster analysis was applied to characterize the relationship between computer and security expertise. Ordered logistic regression models were applied to measure efficacy of the proposed security and computing factors in predicting user comprehension of security concepts: phishing and certificates.

Findings

There are levels to peoples’ computer and security expertise that could be reasonably measured and operationalized. Four factors that constitute computer security-related skills and knowledge are, namely, basic computer skills, advanced computer skills, security knowledge and advanced security skills, and these are identified as determinants of computer expertise.

Practical implications

Findings from this work can be used to guide the design of security interfaces such that it caters to people with different expertise levels and does not force users to exercise more cognitive processes than required.

Originality/value

This work identified four factors that constitute security expertise in end users. Findings from this work were integrated to propose a framework called Security SRK for guiding further research on security expertise. This work posits that security expertise instrument for end user should measure three cognitive dimensions: security skills, rules and knowledge.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Mark Stover

Library managers face a variety of questions and concerns related to information technology on a daily basis. These include the relative merits of interpersonal and…

Abstract

Library managers face a variety of questions and concerns related to information technology on a daily basis. These include the relative merits of interpersonal and communication skills compared with technical abilities; the organisational structure that should be utilised in the distribution of computing resources; the policies that need to be created (or enforced) in relation to the personal use of business computers; issues surrounding computer usage problems (such as carpal tunnel syndrome) that pose potential threats to staff productivity; and the library manager’s pursuit of the “cutting edge” of technology. This study uses qualitative survey data to find patterns and themes among librarians in regard to their attitudes toward managing technology and technological change. It includes a selection of categorised survey responses, interpretation of the data by the author, and suggestions for further research.

Details

Library Management, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

N.A. Ajayi

The concept of the paper is how the library can be a useful framework for designing nurses' computer skills. The overarching aim of the research is to focus on how the…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of the paper is how the library can be a useful framework for designing nurses' computer skills. The overarching aim of the research is to focus on how the computer skills involved in nurses' increasing access to health informatics can be used to improve nursing practice, consequently leading to better health care delivery. The objectives involved in achieving this aim include: finding out the level of nurses' computer literacy; finding out nurses' quest for electronic information for problem‐based nursing practice; investigating nurses' level of awareness of research‐based nursing practice; and finding out areas of desirability of informatics in nursing practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The measuring instrument used was a self‐administered questionnaire to senior nursing cadres in the Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile‐Ife, Nigeria. There were 230 nurses in these categories, of whom 180 were given questionnaires to fill in. The questionnaire was pre‐tested and validated. A total of 167 copies were returned and found to be usable. Simple percentages and a summation weighted index were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insight into nurses' computer skills and the library's role. The majority of the respondents did not have knowledge of computers; in the School of Nursing they learned it through various means while practising, while a few could access and retrieve information from the available databases. Some difficulties were expressed, such as workload, lack of skills, location of the library with regard to the hospital, etc. The desirability of the introduction of health informatics to the profession is high.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to a teaching hospital and the results may not be generalisable to non‐teaching hospitals, hence the need for further studies.

Practical implications

The impact of health informatics on nurses' computer skills and the library's role will save nurses from routine work, enhance their productivity, and will equip them better for the challenges that information technology presents for health professionals.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils and identifies the need to introduce health informatics to nursing practice in order to improve patient care.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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