Search results

1 – 10 of over 90000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Rob Kling

Looking back over the 1990s, it is easy to see the widespread troubles of many ventures that depended upon advanced IT applications, including business process…

Downloads
1588

Abstract

Looking back over the 1990s, it is easy to see the widespread troubles of many ventures that depended upon advanced IT applications, including business process re‐engineering projects, enterprise systems, knowledge management projects, online distance education courses, and, famously, some of the dot‐com businesses. These “troubles” vary from substantial underperformance (i.e. projects that were much more costly and/or produced much less social or business value than most of the participating IT professionals anticipated) and many outright failures. Many of these “troubles” could have been avoided (or at least ameliorated) if the participating IT professionals had much more reliable and critical understanding of the relationships between IT configurations, socio‐technical interventions, social behavior of other participants in different roles, and the dynamics of organizational and social change. Social informatics is the name of the field that studies and theorizes this topic, and is discussed in more detail in this paper. The key issue addressed in this paper is who will produce social informatics research for IT professionals, and where will they learn about important findings, theories, design approaches, etc.? The paper examines the record of computer science in the US as a major contributor to the relevant research and teaching. It also examines the possibilities for new kinds of academic programs – sometimes called “information schools” and “IT schools” – that are being developed to expand beyond the self‐imposed boundaries of computer science and to integrate some organizational and social research as sites for social informatics.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Andreas Zendler, O. William McClung and Dieter Klaudt

The development of a K-12 computer science curriculum based on constructivist principles needs to be informed by knowledge of content and process concepts that are central…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of a K-12 computer science curriculum based on constructivist principles needs to be informed by knowledge of content and process concepts that are central to the discipline of computer science. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking a cross-cultural approach and using an experimental design (a SPF-2•15×16 split-plot design), this study compares the combinations of content and process concepts identified as important in Germany with those considered relevant in the US context.

Findings

First, the combinations of content and process concepts identified in the German context can be generalized to the US context. Second, it is possible to identify combinations of content and process concepts in the US context that are also important in the German context. Third, content and process concepts identified in the two contexts can be integrated to generate a broader perspective that is valid for both contexts.

Practical implications

The results can be used for consolidating available curricular drafts for computer science as a teaching subject at school of the type available in many. The present findings are of great relevance for research-based approaches to the pre- and in-service education of computer science teachers. The methodological approach taken is important in efforts to consolidate curricular models of computer science education, as have been initiated by the Bologna process in Europe and by the organizations Association for Computing Machinery, Association for Information Systems, and Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers-Computer Society in the USA.

Originality/value

Results show that competence areas of central concepts identified in the two contexts can be integrated to generate a broader perspective that is valid for both contexts.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2019

Tehmina Amjad and Ayesha Ali

The purpose of this paper is to trace the knowledge diffusion patterns between the publications of top journals of computer science and physics to uncover the knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the knowledge diffusion patterns between the publications of top journals of computer science and physics to uncover the knowledge diffusion trends.

Design/methodology/approach

The degree of information flow between the disciplines is a measure of entropy and received citations. The entropy gives the uncertainty in the citation distribution of a journal; the more a journal is involved in spreading information or affected by other journals, its entropy increases. The citations from outside category give the degree of inter-disciplinarity index as the percentage of references made to papers of another discipline. In this study, the topic-related diffusion across computer science and physics scholarly communication network is studied to examine how the same research topic is studied and shared across disciplines.

Findings

For three indicators, Shannon entropy, citations outside category (COC) and research keywords, a global view of information flow at the journal level between both disciplines is obtained. It is observed that computer science mostly cites knowledge published in physics journals as compared to physics journals that cite knowledge within the field.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that traces knowledge diffusion trends between computer science and physics publications at journal level using entropy, COC and research keywords.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Hend S. Al-Khalifa

– This study aims to analyze Saudi scientific output in the field of computer science in Web of Science database, covering the years 1978 through 2012.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze Saudi scientific output in the field of computer science in Web of Science database, covering the years 1978 through 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved analyzing 998 publications in terms of the publication count and its growth, citation, share of international collaboration, research areas and researchers’ productivity.

Findings

The results show that the number of papers produced in computer science field has only increased after year 2007; this is because Saudi universities have applied a catch-up strategy to increase its research output. Also, our study reveals that the publication performance of Saudi scientists in computer science was domestic and suffers from low international visibility. Only two universities took the lead in the production of computer science research. Furthermore, computer science research trends in Saudi Arabia focused on engineering, followed by mathematics and telecommunications.

Originality/value

Studies on international academic publication productivity in the Middle East, particularly in Arab countries such as Saudi Arabia, are rarely found. In fact, bibliometric studies on Saudi researchers in the field of computer science are not available. Therefore, the originality of this study resides in being the first study to measure publication productivity of Saudi researchers in the field of computer science.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Kun Shao and Peter Maher

Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using interactive technologies involving live exercises on Windows networking, the Web 2.0 technologies YouTube and Wiki PBworks, the network simulation software Wireshark, and a Data Structure Visualizer (DSV).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts an empirical approach. A novel method for teaching and learning using interactive technologies is demonstrated. Experiments are made through actual classroom teaching, students' participation and their team‐oriented research projects. The assessments come from evaluations and analysis of each technology applied in the learning and teaching process.

Findings

Using traditional teaching methodologies for advanced computer science topics such as networking, telecommunications and data structures present a great challenge to both instructors and students. Incorporating multiple interactive technologies into the computer science curriculum proves to be beneficial in bringing real‐world applications to the classroom, enhancing understanding of abstraction, making advanced computer science topics easier to comprehend and more accessible to students of non‐uniform backgrounds, encouraging active learning and providing students the opportunity to apply solutions to real‐world problems.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed approach needs more experimentation with more classes of various topics. Class time is limited for more comprehensive demonstrations and discussions.

Originality/value

The paper presents an effective pedagogy in engaging learners in active, authentic and collaborative learning.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Stuart Shapiro

The professionalization of IT has long been complicated by disagreementover the appropriate model to employ. Physicians, lawyers, scientists,engineers, artisans, and…

Downloads
606

Abstract

The professionalization of IT has long been complicated by disagreement over the appropriate model to employ. Physicians, lawyers, scientists, engineers, artisans, and artists have all one been invoked at one time or another by one group or another as guiding examples for the development of an IT profession. Yet none of these has proved fully convincing. Discusses the different kinds of professional practice which have been likened to IT, considers why it has proved so difficult to settle on a single one, and suggests an alternative way of conceptualizing IT practice.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Culturally Responsive Strategies for Reforming STEM Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-405-9

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Cueponcaxochitl D. Moreno Sandoval

In an age when computer science largely shapes the engagement of widely diverse populations with the world, the majority of computing professions are dominated by males…

Abstract

In an age when computer science largely shapes the engagement of widely diverse populations with the world, the majority of computing professions are dominated by males, primarily of European descent. This monolithic group exhibits hubris that needs to be mitigated by drawing upon diverse points of view. This chapter examines computer science production and its contribution to global climate change through e-waste, water usage, and technophilia. Examining Indigenous epistemologies and intersectional theory to address race, class, and gender issues in relation to global climate change, the chapter advocates for broadening computer science education as a culturally sustaining (Paris, D. (2012). Culturally sustaining pedagogy: A needed change in stance, terminology, and practice. Educational Researcher, 41(3), 93–97; Paris, D., & Alim, H. S. (2014). What are we seeking to sustain through culturally sustaining pedagogy? A loving critique forward. Harvard Educational Review, 84(1), 85–100) and revitalizing (McCarty & Lee, 2014) approach to nurturing a social and environmentally responsible movement in computer science education.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Lee A. Pedersen and Julie Arendt

Informally computer scientists reported they could access free copies of research papers they needed via tools such as Google Scholar. To ascertain whether this perception…

Abstract

Purpose

Informally computer scientists reported they could access free copies of research papers they needed via tools such as Google Scholar. To ascertain whether this perception came from widespread free access or from unnoticed employer-paid access, the purpose of this paper was to locate computer science papers and determine what proportion was freely available using Google Scholar.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 1,967 conference papers and periodical papers from 2003 to 2010, indexed in the ACM Guide to Computing Literature, was searched for manually in Google Scholar, using the paper or article title and the first author's surname and supplementary searches as needed.

Findings

Free full-text versions were found for 52 per cent of the conference papers and 55 per cent of the periodical papers. Documents with older publication dates were more likely to be freely accessible than newer documents, with free versions found for 71 per cent of items published in 2003 and 43 per cent of items published in 2010.

Research limitations/implications

Results were limited to the retrieval of known computer science publications via Google Scholar. Future research could examine whether the decline found in this study is specific to Google Scholar or reflects a decrease in the free sharing of research by computer scientists.

Originality/value

Previous research for computer science found lower levels of free access than this research determined, but the decline found in this study runs contrary to increases that have been found. This research confirms many computer science papers are available for free but also that subscription holdings are necessary for complete coverage of papers in the field.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Culturally Responsive Strategies for Reforming STEM Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-405-9

1 – 10 of over 90000