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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Sut Ieng Lei, Haili Shen and Shun Ye

Chatbot users’ communication experience with disembodied conversational agents was compared with instant messaging (IM) users’ communication experience with human…

Abstract

Purpose

Chatbot users’ communication experience with disembodied conversational agents was compared with instant messaging (IM) users’ communication experience with human conversational agents. The purpose of this paper is to identify what affects users’ intention to reuse and whether they perceive any difference between the two.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was developed based on computer-mediated communication (CMC) and interpersonal communication theories. Data were collected online from four different continents (North America, Europe, Asia and Australia). Partial least squares structural equation modeling was applied to examine the research model.

Findings

The findings mainly reveal that media richness and social presence positively influence trust and reuse intention through task attraction and social attraction; IM users reported significantly higher scores in terms of communication experience, perceived attractiveness of the conversational agent, and trust than chatbot users; users’ trust in the conversational agents is mainly determined by perceived task attraction.

Research limitations/implications

Customers’ evaluation of the communication environment is positively related to their perceived competence of the conversational agent which ultimately affect their intention to reuse chatbot/IM. The findings reveal determinants of chatbot/IM adoption which have rarely been mentioned by previous work.

Practical implications

Practitioners should note that consumers in general still prefer to interact with human conversational agents. Practitioners should contemplate how to combine chatbot and human resources effectively to deliver the best customer service.

Originality/value

This study goes beyond the Computer as Social Actor paradigm and Technology Acceptance Model to understand chatbot and IM adoption. It is among one of the first studies that compare chatbot and IM use experience in the tourism and hospitality literature.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Kathleen Langan

For student reference supervisors and trainers, it is crucial to understand the characteristics of the millennial worker and how we can effectively train student reference…

Abstract

Purpose

For student reference supervisors and trainers, it is crucial to understand the characteristics of the millennial worker and how we can effectively train student reference employees in virtual reference. The purpose of this paper is to present best practices for training the millennial generation of reference workers on virtual reference.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a combination of a case study and theoretical approach including a literature review of “computer mediated communication” (CMC) theory as well as Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) best practices. This paper describes the creation of a training manual for the millennial student who works in reference and are the primary respondents to instant messaging.

Findings

This project describes why it is necessary to train millennial student reference employees differently than librarians or paraprofessionals when dealing with virtual reference.

Practical implications

This paper presents practical training techniques that are grounded in two major communication theories: politeness theory and CMC theory and applies these theories to the practical training of the millennial student.

Social implications

The library atmosphere is a very social one with several different types of communication methods. Many academic libraries use student employees to staff some of the high traffic public service points. In order to better treat our patrons and maintain a professional atmosphere, it is critical that we train students to leave behind their student mentality when working and to become more professional. It is a question of re‐conditioning the student employee from their more comfortable social methods of communication to that of what patrons expect.

Originality/value

This paper presents the benefits of having a specific training approach when supervising the millennial student reference worker, particularly when it comes to training for instant messaging/chat reference services.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Munir Mandviwalla and Anat Hovav

This paper investigates the use of process redesign tools and techniques in education. We argue that process thinking is an important strategy for improving education. An…

Abstract

This paper investigates the use of process redesign tools and techniques in education. We argue that process thinking is an important strategy for improving education. An adaptation of business process redesign to learning is presented by integrating together concepts from educational theory, computer mediated communication, and business process redesign. Three conventional educational processes ‐ questioning, discussion, and document exchange ‐ are analyzed and redesigned with electronic mail, bulletin board, and World Wide Web technologies. The characteristics of each technology and its potential for process redesign are outlined. The results of an exploratory case study show that learning process redesign is viable and can impact ON educational outcomes. We conclude with suggestions for future research.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Mohit Yadav and Sangita Choudhary

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of satisfaction from romantic relationships on social media usage, with computer-mediated communication (CMC) motives…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of satisfaction from romantic relationships on social media usage, with computer-mediated communication (CMC) motives and self-disclosure dimensions acting as mediators of the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 420 individuals active on social media. Data were analysed with confirmatory factor analysis, Pearson correlation, hierarchical multiple regression and mediation analysis based on Baron and Kenny’s (1986) conditions.

Findings

The result from a cross-sectional survey of 420 individuals reveals how relationship satisfaction leads to the use of six social media channels directly and indirectly through five dimensions of CMC motives and four dimensions of self-disclosure. Out of 54 possible mediations, 17 were found to be significant.

Originality/value

The present study fulfils the need to identify how satisfaction in a romantic relationship impacts self-disclosure and social media selection and usage.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Tommy K. H. Chan

The proliferation of social networking sites (SNSs) has drawn attention to different parties in realising their goals. Advertisers utilise SNSs to promote new products and…

Abstract

The proliferation of social networking sites (SNSs) has drawn attention to different parties in realising their goals. Advertisers utilise SNSs to promote new products and services; politics optimise SNSs to gather support from the public, while ordinary users use SNSs as a unique platform to practice self-disclosure, develop networks, and sustain relationships. This study explores how social anxiety affects self-disclosure on SNSs and well-being. It also examines the moderating effects of two contextual factors, namely, online disinhibition and psychological stress. Two hundred and thirty-four valid responses were collected via an online survey. A positive relationship between social anxiety and self-disclosure, and self-disclosure and well-being was found. Furthermore, a positive moderation effect among social anxiety, online disinhibition, and self-disclosure was revealed. This research contributes to the development of social networking literature. It also enhances the understanding of disclosure patterns on SNSs among socially anxious individuals, thereby providing important insights for practitioners, educators, and clinicians.

Details

Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Małgorzata Bartosik-Purgat

The key purposes of the paper are: firstly, to identify what kind of new media tools are used by managers in communication with foreign business partners for professional…

Abstract

Purpose

The key purposes of the paper are: firstly, to identify what kind of new media tools are used by managers in communication with foreign business partners for professional purposes and which, in their opinion, are the most effective, secondly, to identify the relationships between the usage of new media tools and factors that can impact such communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used in the research was IDI (Individual Depth Interview). Interviews were conducted in 334 companies that operate on the Polish market and which are active internationally (e.g. Asia, Europe, Africa, North and South America), the managers responsible for international relations were the main respondents.

Findings

The most popular and most used new media tools are Skype and instant messengers, which were evaluated as good devices for international personal communication. Additionally the results of the research emphasize the significance of cultural and economic factors when taking into account the usage of new media tools in personal communication between business partners from different companies and countries.

Practical implications

The results of the research can be useful for managers doing business internationally and communicating with business partners from different markets and cultures.

Originality/value

The research presented in the paper covers the gap in the literature because it relates to the environmental factors that impact upon the use of new media tools in personal business communication between partners in the international marketplace.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Louis Yi-Shih Lo and Sheng-Wei Lin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects that reference prices and associated information sources (websites that consumers use to explore and their friends who…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects that reference prices and associated information sources (websites that consumers use to explore and their friends who have similar perspectives on value) have on deal evaluation and intention to disseminate electronic word of mouth (eWOM).

Design/methodology/approach

A stratified survey is conducted to empirically test the relations between reference prices, associated information sources (the top five Consumer-to-consumer (C2C) websites and top five Facebook friends with similar perspectives and values on consumption), deal evaluation, and eWOM intention. The study uses a Facebook API to help participants pick five Facebook friends to act as their favorite sources for advice on shopping.

Findings

The results suggest that consumers’ deal evaluations (as shaped by the recency effects of previous exposure to prices and the influence of Facebook friends and C2C websites) have carry-over effects on their eWOM intentions. The influence of Facebook friends and C2C websites on deal evaluation is as powerful as that of reference price, especially concerning the mean and the lowest prices.

Practical implications

The findings encourage marketers to invest their resources in targeting online groups, and suggest that C2C website marketers should set their offer prices between the mean and the lowest prices.

Originality/value

This study extends prior research on the motives for eWOM dissemination and elaborates an approach to initiate eWOM intention through deal evaluation.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Yu-Hao Lee and Carlin Littles

Social media platforms are increasingly used by activists to mobilize collective actions online and offline. Social media often provide visible information about group…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media platforms are increasingly used by activists to mobilize collective actions online and offline. Social media often provide visible information about group size through system-generated cues. This study is based on social cognitive theory and examines how visible group size on social media influences individuals' self-efficacy, collective efficacy and intentions to participate in a collective action among groups with no prior collaboration experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subject online experiment was conducted with a sample of 188 undergraduate participants in a large public university in the United States. Six versions of a Facebook event page with identical contents were created. The study manipulated the group size shown on the event page (control, 102, 302, 502, 702 and 902). Participants were randomly assigned to one of the six conditions and asked to read and assess an event page that calls for a collective action. Then their collective efficacy, self-efficacy and intentions to participate were measured.

Findings

The results showed that the system-aggregated group size was not significantly associated with perceived collective efficacy, but there was a curvilinear relationship between the group size and perceived self-efficacy. Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between group size and intentions to participate; collective efficacy did not.

Originality/value

The study contributes to social movement theories by moving beyond personal grievance and identity theories to examine how individuals' efficacy beliefs can be affected by the cues that are afforded by social media platforms. The study shows that individuals use system-generated cues about the group size for assessing the perceived self-efficacy and collective efficacy in a group with no prior affiliations. Group size also influenced individual decisions to participate in collective actions through self-efficacy and collective efficacy.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Muhammad Aljukhadar and Sylvain Senecal

The purpose of this paper, building on the media richness theory (MRT), is to propose that while communicating product information via streaming video should enhance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, building on the media richness theory (MRT), is to propose that while communicating product information via streaming video should enhance outcome measures, such an enhancement will be evident mainly for users with equivocal, latent goals (i.e. recreational browsing) rather than for those with less equivocal, concrete goals (i.e. the search of a specific product).

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment involved 337 potential online consumers in Canada, and had full factorial design with four conditions (two methods to communicate product information: textual vs streaming video, and two goals: product searching vs recreational browsing). Analysis of covariance was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results lent support to the hypotheses. The perceived information quality, trusting competence, and arousal for participants with recreational browsing goals were significantly affected when product information where communicated using streaming video. For participants with concrete goals (product searchers), the traditional textual method was as effective as the streaming video method.

Practical implications

The findings entice practitioners to use rich media such as the streaming video method to communicate online information predominantly for users with experiential browsing goals, and to use lean media for users with less equivocal, concrete goals.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the sparse literature that underscores the key role of user goal in shaping the effectiveness of online information. The results provide empirical support to the prediction of MRT that the use of rich media to communicate information is advantageous for users with latent, equivocal goals.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Yuchen Ren and Xiaojing An

Purpose: The issue of whether participation in online peer-support communities has positive or negative impacts on the psychological adjustment of cancer patients warrants

Abstract

Purpose: The issue of whether participation in online peer-support communities has positive or negative impacts on the psychological adjustment of cancer patients warrants further explorations from new perspectives. This research investigates the role of personality traits in moderating the impact of online participation on the psychological adjustment of cancer patients in terms of their general psychological well-being and cancer-specific well-being.

Methodology: Study participants consisted of adults diagnosed with leukemia. Questionnaires were collected from 111 participants in two leukemia-related forums in China, Baidu Leukemia Community and Bloodbbs. Information regarding the personality traits, online participation, and psychological adjustment were collected using an online questionnaire. A linear regression model was used to test the moderation effect of personality traits on the relationship between online participation and psychological adjustment.

Findings: The main effect of participation in online support communities on psychological adjustment was not statistically significant. Importantly, two personality traits (i.e., emotional stability and openness to experience) moderated the relationship between online participation and psychological adjustment to cancer. Leukemia patients with high emotional stability and high openness to experience reported better psychological adjustment as they participated more in the online community. However, this was not the case for patients with low stability and low openness, who reported worse psychological adjustment as their participation in the online support community increased.

Value: This study introduces two personality moderators into the discussion of how participation in online support communities influences the lives of cancer patients. The moderation effects help to explain why there have been contradictions in the findings of previous studies. In addition, this study adds to the current literature on online support communities as little research on this topic has been conducted outside of the US and Europe. Practically, this study not only highlights the need to evaluate the personality traits of patients who are recommended to participate in online communities, but also underlines the necessity of intervention in these communities.

Details

eHealth: Current Evidence, Promises, Perils and Future Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-322-5

Keywords

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