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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Charles H. Cooper and Brian H. Kleiner

Computer literacy is a nebulous term which defies a clear andconcise definition. The inability to define this term properly makes itdifficult for managers to gain a clear…

Abstract

Computer literacy is a nebulous term which defies a clear and concise definition. The inability to define this term properly makes it difficult for managers to gain a clear understanding of their roles as they apply to computer literacy. Presents concepts which will enable managers to understand computer literacy better. The main emphasis is based on a model known as ASK (Awareness, Skill, Knowledge). These factors help to provide an effective method of defining a manager′s role as it pertains to the various elements of computer literacy. Addresses the role of training as it pertains to managers and organizations.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 92 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Charles H. Cooper and Brian H. Kleiner

Computer literacy is a nebulous term which defies a clear and concise definition. The inability to properly define this term makes it difficult for managers to gain a…

Abstract

Computer literacy is a nebulous term which defies a clear and concise definition. The inability to properly define this term makes it difficult for managers to gain a clear understanding of their roles as they apply to computer literacy. This contribution presents concepts which will enable managers to understand computer literacy better. The main emphasis is based on a model known as ASK (Awareness, Skill, Knowledge). These factors help to provide an effective method of defining a manager's role as it pertains to the various elements of computer literacy. The role of training as it pertains to managers and organizations is also addressed.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

David Bawden

The concepts of ‘information literacy’ and ‘digital literacy’ are described, and reviewed, by way of a literature survey and analysis. Related concepts, including computer

Abstract

The concepts of ‘information literacy’ and ‘digital literacy’ are described, and reviewed, by way of a literature survey and analysis. Related concepts, including computer literacy, library literacy, network literacy, Internet literacy and hyper‐literacy are also discussed, and their relationships elucidated. After a general introduction, the paper begins with the basic concept of ‘literacy’, which is then expanded to include newer forms of literacy, more suitable for complex information environments. Some of these, for example library, media and computer literacies, are based largely on specific skills, but have some extension beyond them. They lead togeneral concepts, such as information literacy and digital literacy which are based on knowledge, perceptions and attitudes, though reliant on the simpler skills‐based literacies

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Shiv Kumar and Preeti Mahajan

The purpose of the present study is to determine levels of computer literacy adequate for searching academic information from electronic resources and databases. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to determine levels of computer literacy adequate for searching academic information from electronic resources and databases. The study also examines whether or not student demographics influence this level of computer literacy in a university scenario in India, a developing nation.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary data were collected through a questionnaire-based survey on a sample of 329 respondents from three major universities located in North India. The study focused on only postgraduate students and research scholars. The data, thus collected, were analyzed with the aid of the SPSS statistical software package. χ2 test was also applied to determine significant comparability among student demographics and their acquired computer usage competencies.

Findings

The study discovered that among the respondents less than half reported that they had acquired adequate computer competence to search for information from electronic resources or databases. However, no significant differences were found for computer skills with respect to students having different demographic characteristics. There were observed significant differences among academic majors and the use of internet and OPAC. Significant differences were also observable between academic use of internet and students varying age groups.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few research studies carried out to examine computer literacy among university students especially in relation to their demographics. The results of the study will prove useful for improving computer literacy in university library systems in India and other developing nations.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Lawrence Hamburg and Paul Helm

It would be wrong to assume that incoming undergraduates in the1990s are already in possession of computer skills. The University ofBradford has recognised that all…

Abstract

It would be wrong to assume that incoming undergraduates in the 1990s are already in possession of computer skills. The University of Bradford has recognised that all students, no matter what their background or subject area, need basic computer literacy skills not only to complete their course successfully, but also to be attractive to industry and commerce on graduation. The Enterprise in Higher Education (EHE) programme is promoting innovation and changes in traditional teaching and learning styles. EHE recognises the importance of computers within this process. At Bradford, this is achieved through the use of hardware and software provided by the Computerisation Project. The Bradford approach is to integrate the computer literacy element into all areas of the curriculum.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Stephen Mutula, Trywell Kalusopa, Kgomotso Moahi and Justus Wamukoya

The purpose of this paper is to present findings of the design and implementation of an online information literacy module to first‐year students at the University of Botswana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings of the design and implementation of an online information literacy module to first‐year students at the University of Botswana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study population consisted of 103 first‐year students in the Department of Library and Information Studies. The population was divided into three equal groups of 34, 34 and 35, respectively, and each assigned a two‐hour slot in the smart computer laboratory weekly for five consecutive weeks, to cover five information literacy topics online. Each group was assigned a tutor who received assignments online and graded them. Each topic was followed by questions for students to answer.

Findings

Findings generally revealed that impartation of information literacy through the online mode could improve students' competencies perhaps more than the face‐to‐face instruction approach. Furthermore, respondents preferred a blended instruction approach to a single learning mode. Contrary to expectations, online instruction might not minimise the copying of each other's work among students to a great extent. Finally, online instruction does not necessarily reduce the amount of workload for staff and students, instead more time is needed to design and administer the course.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to first year students in the LIS department. A similar study involving all departments in the University of Botswana would shed more light on the level of information literacy competency among first year students from a cross‐disciplinary perspective.

Practical implications

The major outcome of the study is a re‐usable online information literacy module. The study findings could also be useful in developing interventions to improve the design and delivery of online courses.

Originality/value

Information literacy is a key challenge facing educators all over the world. Case studies such as this provide unique and comparative experiences that advance existing knowledge. For the University of Botswana, the study provides a first insight into the impact of e‐learning on information literacy competency since the implementation WebCT in 2002.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Despo Ktoridou and Nikleia Eteokleous‐Grigoriou

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a 40‐hour computer course for beginners provided to a group of unemployed women learners with no/minimum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a 40‐hour computer course for beginners provided to a group of unemployed women learners with no/minimum computer literacy skills who can be characterized as digital immigrants. The aim of the study is to identify participants' perceptions and experiences regarding technology, any barriers and challenges faced throughout the computer course and the extent to which the computer course assisted them in becoming computer literate and employable. This case study was based on the European Commission's EQUAL program.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was employed making use of qualitative and quantitative data. Quantitative data were collected using three different questionnaires (the background questionnaire, the Loyd/Gressard Computer Attitude Scale questionnaire and the Computer Skills Tests questionnaire) and qualitative data were collected through two focus groups. A total of nine unemployed women with no/minimum computer literacy skills were the focus of investigation. The 40‐hour computer literacy course and the data collection process took place in May‐June 2007.

Findings

Results demonstrated the effectiveness and necessity of computer courses for digital immigrants. The participants developed an acceptable level of computer literacy skills and a more positive attitude towards technology. They further realized the importance of possessing computer literacy skills specifically in relation to their employability, professional path and career development. Their self‐esteem in relation to technology was also increased on professional, educational, and personal levels.

Originality/value

The study confirms the necessity to explore further instructional design and implementation of digital immigrants' education and training regarding computer technology.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Hajar Safahieh and Asefeh Asemi

This paper aims to assess the level of computer literacy skills of librarians in the University of Isfahan, Iran and attempts to examine their avenue of computer literacy

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the level of computer literacy skills of librarians in the University of Isfahan, Iran and attempts to examine their avenue of computer literacy, software used, benefits derived from computer and problems militating against effective usage of computers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a survey research approach to carry out this investigation.

Findings

The investigation reveals that the majority of the librarians do not yet possess a good level of computer skills and even their long duration experience of computer use has not necessarily improved their level of computer literacy.

Practical implications

The findings can be utilized by library managers in order to organize and offer regular training programmes to train or re‐train librarians with the latest advancement of information technology.

Originality/value

The paper provides insight into the state of computer literacy of librarians in one of the public universities in Iran. This shows the urgent need for the librarians to be adequately equipped with the computer skills to take advantage of all computerized library facilities.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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