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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Anna Saraneva and Maria Sääksjärvi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emotions young compulsive buyers experience while shopping.

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3476

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emotions young compulsive buyers experience while shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a digital ethnography study by communicating with 22 young compulsive buyers for two weeks using their cell phones while they were engaged in the shopping activity.

Findings

The results show that the emotions experienced by compulsive buyers are much more complex than previously thought. The emotions young consumers go through during the shopping process are not predominantly negative or positive. Instead, young consumers move up and down on an emotional continuum during shopping. The trigger involved with the emotions is linked to finding a bargain. A bargain is defined as a good deal, or a situation in which the consumers perceive they get mental satisfaction from their purchase. If young compulsive shoppers find a bargain, they feel pride, happiness, and goal achievement. However, if they do not manage to find a bargain, they feel disappointed, sad, and unsuccessful.

Research limitations/implications

This study was focused on adolescent consumers. Although this age group is considered suitable for conducting a study of compulsive buying, the results cannot be generalized to other age groups.

Originality/value

Compared to previous studies, the paper uncovers emotions and emotional shifts in much greater detail, providing new insights to the phenomenon of compulsive buying, considering the range of emotions that consumers experience, and the triggers involved with their emotional shifts.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Saqib Ali, Manit Mishra and Hafiz Muhammad Usama Javed

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between mall personality, hedonic and utilitarian shopping value, and shoppers' well-being. The moderating effect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between mall personality, hedonic and utilitarian shopping value, and shoppers' well-being. The moderating effect of compulsive shopping on the association between both hedonic and utilitarian shopping value, and shoppers' well-being is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative in nature, and a purposive sampling technique is used. Data was collected through mall intercept survey. The authors collected 431 usable responses from respondents at two different malls in Lahore, Pakistan. PLS-SEM was employed to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results indicate that mall personality significantly and positively influences both hedonic and utilitarian shopping value and shoppers' well-being. Similarly, hedonic shopping value has a significant and positive impact on shoppers' well-being, while utilitarian shopping value has a non-significant relationship with shoppers' well-being. Moreover, while compulsive shopping behaviour moderates the positive relationship between hedonic shopping value and shoppers' well-being, it does not moderate the relationship between utilitarian shopping value and shoppers' well-being.

Originality/value

Despite the extant studies on brand and store personality on numerous retail outcomes, no study has examined the association between mall personality and shoppers' well-being. Another key contribution of this study is to examine moderation effect of compulsive shopping on the association between shopping value and shoppers' well-being. Additionally, this study enlightens mall administration to emphasise upon mall personality and hedonic shopping value so as to enhance shoppers' well-being, more so if its product assortment encourages compulsive shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Aviv Shoham and Maja Makovec Brenčič

Consumer compulsive buying is an important area of inquiry in consumer behavior research. The importance of studying compulsive buying, stems, in part, from its nature as…

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21223

Abstract

Consumer compulsive buying is an important area of inquiry in consumer behavior research. The importance of studying compulsive buying, stems, in part, from its nature as a negative aspect of consumer behavior. Specifically, exploring negative consumption phenomena could provide modified or new perspectives for the study of positive consumption behaviors. Moreover, research on negative facets of consumption is useful because it can potentially contribute to society’s wellbeing, an important criterion for usefulness of any research. This paper builds on earlier papers to propose a model of compulsivity antecedents. Gender, consumers’ tendency to make unplanned purchases, and their tendency to buy products not on shopping lists, serve to predict compulsive tendencies in a sample of Israeli consumers. The findings suggest that these antecedents affect compulsive tendencies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Agata Maccarrone-Eaglen and Peter Schofield

The purpose of this study is to re-examine the characteristics of compulsive buying behaviour (CBB) based on a new improved screener. The study analyses young compulsive

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1014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to re-examine the characteristics of compulsive buying behaviour (CBB) based on a new improved screener. The study analyses young compulsive buyer attitudes, decision-making, product preferences, the impact of credit card use and post-purchase perspectives in relation to CBB severity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study takes a quantitative approach to the analysis of compulsive behaviour among young consumers, using data from a questionnaire survey and a large sample. A wide range of statistical procedures and structural equation modelling are used in the analysis.

Findings

The segmentation of compulsive buyers, on the basis of disorder severity, provides important insights into the asymmetrical between-group variation in anxiety levels, product preferences, feelings, attitudes and credit card impact and the within-group variability in daily compulsivity patterns and associated shopping behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Although the overall used sample size is large, the subdivision of compulsive consumers into mild and severe categories resulted in a relatively small group of severely compulsive buyers; hence, further research is recommended to corroborate the findings from this study. In addition, this research does not address the disorder’s temporal dimension; therefore, future longitudinal studies should be undertaken to analyse the progression and characteristics of the disorder over time.

Practical implications

The significant differences between mild compulsive buyers and severely compulsive buyers make a significant contribution to counselling practitioners because of the different levels of support that should be offered in relation to the severity of the condition.

Originality/value

The study compares non-compulsive behaviour with occasionally compulsive, mildly compulsive and severely compulsive consumers using an improved screening tool. It identifies critical criteria that distinguish between mild and severe forms of the disorder, which have hitherto been neglected, yet represent key diagnostic and predictive factors, which can inform both early intervention and our understanding of CBB and its complexity.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Xin-Jean Lim, Jun-Hwa Cheah, Tat Huei Cham, Hiram Ting and Mumtaz Ali Memon

Compulsive buying continues to be a maladaptive behavior that draws the attention of both scholars and marketers. The present study aims to investigate the determinants of…

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1781

Abstract

Purpose

Compulsive buying continues to be a maladaptive behavior that draws the attention of both scholars and marketers. The present study aims to investigate the determinants of compulsive buying, which are conceptualized as impulsive and obsessive–compulsive buying, and the mediation effect of brand attachment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using purposive sampling, a self-administered questionnaire was completed by 600 young consumers in Malaysia. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results show that materialism, utilitarian value, and brand attachment are positively related to impulsive buying, while materialism, hedonic value, and brand attachment have a positive effect on obsessive–compulsive buying. In addition, brand attachment is found to mediate the effect of materialism and utilitarian value on both compulsive buying.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides new insights into brand management literature by examining the predictors of impulsive and obsessive–compulsive buying. Moreover, brand attachment is found to be a significant mechanism that induces negative buying behavior. However, due to the growth of online shopping, future research should consider different types of retailers to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the subject matter in the modern business landscape.

Originality/value

Being one of the few studies to address both impulsive and obsessive–compulsive buying behaviors among consumers, this study highlights the essential role of brand attachment as a mediator in the contemporary setting. Moreover, the interrelationships between self-congruence, materialism, hedonic value, utilitarian value, brand attachment, and compulsive buying behavior are examined in a holistic manner.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Csilla Horváth and Marcel van Birgelen

This article investigates the role that brands play in influencing the behavior and purchase decisions of compulsive buyers and whether this role differs for noncompulsive…

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7579

Abstract

Purpose

This article investigates the role that brands play in influencing the behavior and purchase decisions of compulsive buyers and whether this role differs for noncompulsive buyers, resulting in four research propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews, conducted with ten compulsive and ten noncompulsive buyers, reveal several interesting differences between the groups.

Findings

The findings reveal several interesting differences between compulsive buyers and noncompulsive buyers. Noncompulsive buyers seem to appreciate and focus mainly on functional benefits of branded products and avoid buying unbranded products, whereas compulsive buyers value emotional and social benefits but often decide to buy “more and cheaper” items to achieve variety in their purchases. Noncompulsive buyers develop brand trust in, attachment to and higher willingness to pay for their favorite brand than for other brands, whereas compulsive buyers even struggle to name a favorite brand. Furthermore, compulsive buyers engage in more brand switching than noncompulsive buyers.

Research limitations/implications

While this research provides the first, in-depth findings, a large-scale survey research is called for to provide statistically valid tests of the authors ' propositions.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that compulsive and noncompulsive buyers seek different benefits of brands. Stressing the good quality should be particularly effective for noncompulsive buyers, whereas compulsive buyers will be triggered more effectively by claims about the emotional benefits. This finding has obvious implications for brand communication strategies but also raises an important ethical dilemma. The findings further indicate that compulsive buyers react to branded products in ways that may hurt brands with high brand equity. These, therefore, have an incentive to help compulsive buyers overcome this problem, rather than encouraging them in their buying behavior.

Social implications

Considering the harmful effects of compulsive buying behavior on a person’s well-being, manufacturers and retailers should take corporate social responsibility in this situation and help society deal with it, using both proactive and reactive methods. For example, to facilitate the early identification of this type of behavior, retailers might stimulate customers to think about their purchasing motivations and inform them about the risks of compulsive buying. They could initiate the development, support or sponsorship of a “Shop Responsibly” campaign to help customers avoid such buying behaviors. Not only would these efforts increase customer satisfaction and loyalty, but they could boost the public image of the firm as a responsible organization that cares for societal well-being.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate how compulsive buyers approach brands and whether they approach brands differently from noncompulsive buyers. It can draw attention to and encourage future research in this important area.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2018

Eugene Cheng-Xi Aw, Jun-Hwa Cheah, Siew Imm Ng and Murali Sambasivan

The purpose of this study is to examine compulsive buying and its interrelationships with careful spending, loan dependence and financial trouble. This study also aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine compulsive buying and its interrelationships with careful spending, loan dependence and financial trouble. This study also aims to investigate the moderating role of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey was conducted. Two hundred and seven responses were collected using purposive sampling technique. Partial least square–structural equation modelling was performed to analyze the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The salient findings are (1) careful spending negatively influences compulsive buying, (2) compulsive buying positively influences loan dependence and financial trouble, (3) loan dependence positively influences financial trouble, (4) the relationships between careful spending and compulsive buying, and between loan dependence and financial trouble differ between male and female consumers, (5) there is a sequential mediation effect between careful spending and financial trouble and (6) there are gender differences between careful spending and compulsive buying and between loan dependence and financial trouble.

Research limitations/implications

This study empirically validates the role of short-term money attitude, conceptualized as careful spending in compulsive buying context and how it attenuates the consequences of compulsive buying.

Originality/value

This study explains the serial mechanism in which careful spending can be used to counteract financial trouble of youngsters, and further looks into the differences of relationships in term of gender through multi-group analysis.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Natalie Brici, Chris Hodkinson and Gillian Sullivan‐Mort

There have been recent calls for research into the impulse shopping behaviours of adolescent consumers – an important topic because adolescents are: an increasingly…

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2696

Abstract

Purpose

There have been recent calls for research into the impulse shopping behaviours of adolescent consumers – an important topic because adolescents are: an increasingly important market segment; a segment which has recently been empowered by the availability of easy credit; and which is increasingly targeted by strategic marketing collateral. This paper responds to the call by aiming to focus on the impulse shopping behaviours of adolescents.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is qualitative in nature and utilises lengthy mini focus group interviews of both adolescent and adult consumer shoppers. The verbatim transcriptions are then subjected to both manual and automated textual analysis to derive conceptual and thematic maps of each group's discussions in relation to impulse shopping.

Findings

Consistent with recent neuropsychological literature on adolescents, the findings show clear differences between adolescents and adults in relation to impulse shopping. Significant differences were found in the areas of antecedent moods, shopping purpose, and the range of perceived constraints which may moderate impulse shopping behaviour. The research also shows that impulse buying among adolescents is a behaviour which is undertaken often in response to stress and/or a need for mood amelioration and further that their conceptualisation of impulse shopping is only distantly related to a deficient set of perceived constraints when compared to adult shoppers.

Practical implications

This improved understanding of the bases of adolescent impulse shopping will assist in the design of educational programs to reduce the frequency of adolescent financial problems.

Social implications

There may be a reduction in the number of adolescents facing resultant financial hardship.

Originality/value

This is the first such study which reports the belief structures of adolescent impulse shoppers versus adults.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Rashmi Singh and J. K. Nayak

The compulsive buying (CB)behaviour has become topics of increasing interest to researchers and policy makers, particularly because researches have shown that it can…

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1151

Abstract

Purpose

The compulsive buying (CB)behaviour has become topics of increasing interest to researchers and policy makers, particularly because researches have shown that it can influence consumer behaviour and well-being. However, a clear picture of how this phenomenon arises has proven elusive. Using the adolescents perceived level of stress as an integrative framework, the purpose of this paper is to derive hypotheses from two theoretical perspectives (the stress and CB behaviour), and uses a survey of adolescents (15-18) year in India to test the hypotheses.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is the first to experimentally manipulate important stressors in the lives of adolescents, i.e. familial and non-familial; and measures its impact on CB among a sample of 15-18-year old adolescents. Next, the authors investigate the relationship between CB and post-purchase regret and then whether gender moderates the stress-CB relationship.

Findings

The present study finds that adolescents increasingly turn to CB in an attempt to cope with heightened levels of stress due to familial and non-familial factors. Surprisingly, findings reveal that non-familial factors are not a major source of stress among adolescents. Gender was not found to moderate stress-CB relationship. Both boys and girls were found to respond to higher levels of stress with higher incidences of CB. Results suggest that CB behaviour is a common coping strategy for adolescents from both genders. The findings indicate that one’s experiences and circumstances in adolescence are related to their CB behaviour, thus a framework has been used to elucidate them, have important implications for theory and practice.

Originality/value

The study makes some inimitable and significant contributions to the literature. It portrays one of few studies to investigate CB during adolescence period – a hard to reach population. Here authors experimentally manipulate stress levels to investigate its impact on CB. The study’s findings in regard to gender’s impact on the stress-CB relationship suggest that CB begins during adolescence period and is a common coping strategy for both boys and girls.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Dawn Burton

Postmodernism has provided valuable insights into the cultural significance of shopping and shopping sites in advanced societies. Despite their important contribution…

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4420

Abstract

Postmodernism has provided valuable insights into the cultural significance of shopping and shopping sites in advanced societies. Despite their important contribution, postmodern accounts of shopping behaviour have predominantly focused on shopping in public spaces of malls and high streets. In this paper it will be argued that postmodern accounts of consumer shopping behaviour need to be developed and applied within the home shopping and wider remote shopping context. Directions for future research are proposed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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