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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Yuan Huang, Weixi Han and Douglas K. Macbeth

This paper aims to investigate the complexity of collaborations in supply chain networks, particularly the influence of horizontal collaborations (e.g. international joint…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the complexity of collaborations in supply chain networks, particularly the influence of horizontal collaborations (e.g. international joint ventures) on vertical collaborations (e.g. supplier–manufacturer partnering relationships).

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study including four horizontal collaborations and five vertical collaborations within a supply chain network is presented in the context of the Chinese automotive industry. Data interpretation from interviews is structured by key collaborative activities and collaborative behaviors.

Findings

The analysis highlights a variety of collaborative behaviors under different types of collaboration and their interaction. The complexity of collaboration is revealed in a range of dimensions including culture diversity, drivers/facilitators, competitive/collaborative advantages and the engagement of all. Collaboration evolves as the structure of the supply chain changes; the key is to appreciate the existence of cooperation, competition and culture conflicts and to manage the trade-offs.

Research limitations/implications

A window of opportunity is presented for future research to investigate the complexity of supply chain collaboration in a wider industrial or geographical context, including statistical validation and comparative analysis.

Practical implications

A contingent view on supply chain collaboration is promoted to practitioners (e.g. international supply chain managers), where collaborative activities should be aligned with the motive and type of business relationships which may change as collaboration develops.

Originality/value

A rare empirical study captures the complexity of supply chain collaboration including the interaction between different forms. A dynamic collaboration approach recognizes the changing process, varying cooperation behaviors as well as characteristics of partners which have not been sufficiently reflected in the literature.

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2009

Anne Croker, Joy Higgs and Fanziska Trede

Collaboration’ and ‘team’ are terms commonly used in literature related to the provision of health care, including rehabilitation. However, the complexity of the…

Abstract

Collaboration’ and ‘team’ are terms commonly used in literature related to the provision of health care, including rehabilitation. However, the complexity of the phenomena represented by these terms is often overlooked. ‘Collaboration’ is rarely defined, and ‘teams’ are often presented as easily identifiable and stable entities. Simplistic use of these terms often results in different aspects of interprofessional practice being researched and discussed without reference to the ‘messiness’ (the ambiguities and complexities) surrounding professional practice. As a consequence, health professionals may have difficulties in understanding the relevance of such research to their particular situations. This paper explores the complexities of the phenomenon of collaboration and the concept of team, with the aim of highlighting the benefits of researchers embracing rather than simplifying these phenomena. The paper reports on emerging models in action, which is one part of a wider research project exploring collaboration within rehabilitation teams. The research approach was informed by hermeneutic phenomenology. Insights gained through this project led to the development of two models: the first conceptualising collaboration in relation to domains of process, product and players; the other model proposing the notion of collaborative arenas. The model of collaborative arenas recognises the blurred boundaries and interrelated team memberships that occur in rehabilitation teams. Both models informed ongoing data collection and analysis for this research project and have potential to inform conceptualisation of teams and collaboration for other researchers.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Margherita Pero, Nizar Abdelkafi, Andrea Sianesi and Thorsten Blecker

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework that explains how new product development and supply chain variables are related to one another and how they affect performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework that explains how new product development and supply chain variables are related to one another and how they affect performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The insights from literature and an exploratory case study are combined to develop an alignment framework, which is then tested using a multiple case study design.

Findings

Variety, modularity, and innovativeness are the product features that are taken into account when studying alignment. From the supply chain viewpoint, configuration, collaboration, and coordination complexities are the variables that matter. Innovativeness is found to have a stronger effect than variety on supply chain complexity. In addition, there is evidence that matching product features with supply chains improves performance.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical support to the relationships among the variables within the alignment framework. There is evidence that product innovativeness, a variable so far neglected in the alignment literature, can have a critical impact on the supply chain. Furthermore, supply chain complexity must be adequately adapted, depending on the product features.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Amit Arora, Anshu Saxena Arora, K. Sivakumar and Gerard Burke

This paper aims to examines the moderating effect of small vs large supply base size on the relationship between strategic sustainable purchasing (SSP) and organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examines the moderating effect of small vs large supply base size on the relationship between strategic sustainable purchasing (SSP) and organizational sustainability performance (OSP). SSP is conceptualized as a dynamic capability consisting of strategic purchasing and environmental purchasing. Environmental collaboration is conceptualized as a mediator between SSP and OSP. Extant research has not examined the effect of the size of the supply base on the relationship between SSP and OSP.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized relationships are tested using a two-step multi-group analysis in partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

A small supply base size positively moderates the relationship between SSP and environmental collaboration, thus achieving OSP. In contrast, when the supply base is large, strategic purchasing is positively associated with environmental collaboration, while environmental purchasing is negatively related to environmental collaboration. A large supply base has a positive relationship to environmental collaboration and economic sustainability, while the relationship between environmental collaboration and environmental and social performance is not significant.

Practical implications

This research argues that despite the nuances in the moderating effects of small versus large supply base size, managers need to invest in both dynamic and relational capabilities to achieve organizational sustainability.

Originality/value

Scant research is available in supply chain management research that has examined the important effect of the supply base size on the relationship between SSP and OSP. This research aims to fill this gap. The study helps practitioners understand the effects of supply base sizes for their organizations, increase interrelationships among suppliers, reduce the level of differentiation among them, and, thereby, reduce costs and increase revenues.

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Linda Höglund, Maria Mårtensson and Aswo Safari

The purpose of this paper is to study how different types of trust develop and change over time in the collaboration between an organization and its board.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how different types of trust develop and change over time in the collaboration between an organization and its board.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a response to a recent call to apply the concept of trust in understanding the collaboration between a public organization, its board, and other stakeholders. Here, the authors study a single case, and based on a longitudinal in-depth case study method covering the period of 2003–2015, the authors have conducted 27 interviews, including the CEO and all the board members.

Findings

The authors introduce and advance the concept of trust in the public sector literature on board work. This paper shows that trust is complex and multidimensional at different units of analysis. The types of trust discussed in this paper are cognitive, affective, contractual, competence, and goodwill. Different types of trust are developed to make the collaboration between a governed organization and its board to work.

Research limitations/implications

Because this paper uses the case study method and only studies one single case, the findings of this paper might be questioned on the issue of generalization.

Originality/value

The authors conceptualize and adopt trust as a multidimensional, dynamic concept, and with different units of analyses, capture the nature of the collaboration between a public organization and its board, and its complexity.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Martin Hingley, Adam Lindgreen, David B. Grant and Charles Kane

There is a paucity of literature considering horizontal collaboration among grocery retailers, suppliers, and third‐party logistics (3PL) providers. This paper seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a paucity of literature considering horizontal collaboration among grocery retailers, suppliers, and third‐party logistics (3PL) providers. This paper seeks to investigate benefits of and barriers to the use of fourth‐party logistics (4PL) management as a catalyst for horizontal collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Three suppliers, three logistics service providers (LSPs), and one grocery retailer participated in semi‐structured interviews for this exploratory qualitative study.

Findings

Large LSPs can establish 4PL management but the significant investment required to do so is a deterrent. Interviewees believed 4PL would negatively influence the grocery retailer‐supplier dynamic but simultaneously would provide key potential benefits. Retaining supply chain control means more to grocery retailers than cost efficiencies realised through horizontal collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

Fierce competition among major grocery chains means that most are unwilling to participate in studies of their systems, which restricts the research scope.

Practical implications

Some stakeholders want deeper integration into grocery supply networks, and the 4PL model could apply to diverse sectors and circumstances. This study shows that barriers to such integration are created by power plays among lead stakeholders in grocery retailing that inhibit horizontal collaboration regardless of cost or other benefits.

Originality/value

The study investigates an under‐researched aspect of horizontal supply chain collaboration in the highly relevant retail grocery sector: a high volume, mass market industry that requires an enormous logistics infrastructure and highly embedded networks of relationships.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Don Mankin, Susan Cohen and Stephen P. Fitzgerald

People have worked together since the beginnings of human time. Since then the forms of collaboration have barely changed. While a group of laborers building the pyramids…

Abstract

People have worked together since the beginnings of human time. Since then the forms of collaboration have barely changed. While a group of laborers building the pyramids of Egypt might seem to bear little resemblance to a team of machine operators working in a plant, they actually have much in common. Both groups are made up of people of similar backgrounds with clear loyalties and interests, interacting face-to-face to perform relatively well-defined tasks in pursuit of a shared goal.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Sofie Pilemalm, Ida Lindgren and Elina Ramsell

This study aims to explore recent public sector trends, inter-organizational and cross-sector collaborations, and analyzes these in terms of implications for participative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore recent public sector trends, inter-organizational and cross-sector collaborations, and analyzes these in terms of implications for participative development of information systems (IS). These trends are understood as being part of emerging forms of e-government. Initial suggestions for how to develop IS in the new contexts are provided.

Design/methodology/approach

Three cases involving the trends described above, taking place in the Swedish emergency response system, are studied and used as basis for identified participative IS development challenges and suggested adaptation needs. Data collection involves semi-structured interviews, focus groups and future workshops.

Findings

The identified challenges concern balancing ideological versus practical needs, lack of resources, lack of know-how and design techniques and tool challenges. Some practical implications for participative IS development include more extensive focus on stakeholder and legal analysis, need for interdisciplinary design teams, merging of task and needs analysis for yet-undefined user tasks and using on-line alternatives for interacting with users.

Research implications/limitations

The study is exploratory where the three cases are in different, but at the same time interrelated, collaboration contexts. The identified implications and challenges provide proposals that in future research can be applied, formalized and integrated when developing practically feasible participative IS development approaches.

Originality/value

It is argued that the results point toward a current emerging form of e-government initiatives directed toward certain demarcated groups of citizens actually carrying out certain tasks for their co-citizens and society rather than the broad masses, having far-reaching practical implications and complicating the issue of IS development.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Timothy Meaklim

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on one of the key complexities of collaboration and co-operative working in the public service within the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on one of the key complexities of collaboration and co-operative working in the public service within the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses the attention on the difficulty of partnership working at a time when leading collaboration is a necessity for all leaders in the public sector. It explores one area of this complexity, namely game theory in order to offer an explanation why departments or organisations find it difficult to co-operate as they should.

Findings

The paper allows leaders to understand the complexities of co-operation and the reason why there is often a tendency for individuals to act in a selfish manner on behalf of their organisation. Being aware of this behaviour will provide leaders with a greater ability to build trust and develop joint strategies which will provide positive outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper will highlight how greater understanding of game theory including the prisoner dilemma and the stag hunt can help improve leadership, relationships and outcomes within partnerships.

Details

The International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2005

Nancy L. Southern

This chapter discusses the personal and organizational risk factors of collaboration and shows the necessity of creating organizational cultures that support collaborative…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the personal and organizational risk factors of collaboration and shows the necessity of creating organizational cultures that support collaborative action. Building collaborative capital is presented as a transformative process requiring a shift in individual and collective beliefs and assumptions and new patterns of action and supporting structures that encourage communicative competence and risk taking. Collaboration is viewed through a relational lens, incorporating hermeneutic concepts. A process is offered that begins a cultural change by strengthening communicative relationships among senior leaders. A city government and public utility in a major city in the United States provide examples of actions taken by senior leaders committed to the endeavor of creating cultures of collaboration.

Details

Collaborative Capital: Creating Intangible Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-222-1

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