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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Julie McLeod and Sue Childs

The purpose of this paper is to provide an approach to viewing the “wicked” problem of electronic records management (ERM), using the Cynefin framework, a sense‐making

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2433

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an approach to viewing the “wicked” problem of electronic records management (ERM), using the Cynefin framework, a sense‐making tool. It re‐conceptualises the ERM challenge by understanding the nature of the people issues. This supports decision making about the most appropriate tactics to adopt to effect positive change.

Design/methodology/approach

Cynefin was used to synthesise qualitative data from an empirical research project that investigated strategies and tactics for improving ERM.

Findings

ERM may be thought of as a dynamic, complex challenge but, viewed through the Cynefin framework, many issues are not complex; they are simple or complicated and can be addressed using best or good practice. The truly complex issues need a different approach, described as emergent practice. Cynefin provides a different lens through which to view, make sense of and re‐perceive the ERM challenge and offers a strategic approach to accelerating change.

Research limitations/implications

Since Cynefin has been applied to one data set, the findings are transferrable not generalisable. They, and/or the approach, can be used to further test the propositions.

Practical implications

The resultant ERM framework provides a practical example for information and records managers to exploit or use as a starting point to explore the situation in particular organisational contexts. It could also be used in other practical, teaching and/or research‐related records contexts.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new strategic approach to addressing the wicked problem of ERM, which is applicable for any organisational context.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Sue Childs and Julie McLeod

The purpose of this paper is to complement a previous article on using the Cynefin framework to make sense of the electronic records management challenge. Its focus is on

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2178

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to complement a previous article on using the Cynefin framework to make sense of the electronic records management challenge. Its focus is on how to use Cynefin, and the ERM framework developed using it, as an approach to addressing this wicked problem. The aim is to provide examples of how they could be used in practice in different organisational contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Four examples are provided. Empirical research data are used to underpin three of the examples and a thought experiment using published literature informs the fourth.

Findings

The examples illustrate the potential value and power of the Cynefin framework as both a practical and conceptual tool in the ERM context. It can be used to address the ERM challenge in different ways: as a strategic approach taking a holistic view and/or as a tactical approach at a more specific granular level. It can be used to inform practice by helping practitioners choose the most appropriate approach dependent on the level of complexity of the issue they are addressing, whether that is for a specific issue, a project or initiative, for planning or for exploratory, sense-making purposes.

Research limitations/implications

The examples draw on one qualitative, empirical set of research data and one published use. Further experimentation and practical use are required; others are encouraged to use Cynefin to test the propositions and provide further examples.

Practical implications

The examples provided can be adopted and/or adapted by records professionals, both practitioners and/or academics, at strategic and tactical levels in different records contexts.

Originality/value

This paper provides examples of adopting a different approach to tackling the wicked problem of managing electronic records using the Cynefin framework as a new lens.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Ummul Hanan Mohamad, Mohammad Nazir Ahmad and Ahmad Mujahid Ubaidillah Zakaria

This systematic literature review (SLR) paper presents the overview and analysis of the existing ontologies application in the SE domain. It discusses the main challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

This systematic literature review (SLR) paper presents the overview and analysis of the existing ontologies application in the SE domain. It discusses the main challenges in terms of its ontologies development and highlights the key knowledge areas for subdomains in the SE domain that provides a direction to develop ontologies application for SE systematically. The SE is not as straightforward as the traditional economy. It transforms the existing economy ecosystem through peer-to-peer collaborations mediated by the technology. Hence, the complexity of the SE domain accentuates the need to make the SE domain knowledge more explicit.

Design/methodology/approach

For the review, the authors only focus on the journal articles published from 2010 to 2020 and mentioned ontology as a solution to overcome the issues specific for the SE domain. The initial identification process produced 3,326 papers from 10 different databases.

Findings

After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, a final set of 11 articles were then analyzed and classified. In SE, good ontology design and development is essential to manage digital platforms, deal with data heterogeneity and govern the interoperability of the SE systems. Yet the preference to build an application ontology, lack of perdurant design and minimal use of the existing standard for building SE common knowledge are deterring the ontology development in this domain. From this review, an anatomy of the SE key subdomain areas is visualized as a reference to further develop the domain ontology for the SE domain systematically.

Originality/value

With the arrival of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), the sharing economy (SE) has become one of the important domains whose impact has been explosive, and its domain knowledge is complex. Yet, a comprehensive overview and analysis of the ontology applications in the SE domain is not available or well presented to the research community.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Cheryl Desha, Savindi Caldera and Deanna Hutchinson

This study aims to explore the role of planned, sudden shifts in lived experiences, in influencing learner capabilities towards improved problem-solving for sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of planned, sudden shifts in lived experiences, in influencing learner capabilities towards improved problem-solving for sustainable development outcomes. The authors responded to employers of engineering and built environment graduates observing limited “real-life” problem-solving skills, beyond using established formulae and methods, in spite of attempts over more than two decades, to train engineers and other built environment disciplines in areas such as whole system design and sustainable design.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory approach was used to guide the analysis of data collected through ethnographic methods. The process involved reflecting on authors’ efforts to develop context appreciation within a course called “International Engineering Practice”, using two years of collected data (archived course information, including course profile; completed assessment; lecture and field visit evaluations; and focus groups). The study is built on the authors’ working knowledge of Bloom’s Taxonomy and Threshold Learning Theory, and the well-established role of “context appreciation” in complex problem-solving. After the first iteration of the course, the authors looked for additional theoretical support to help explain findings. The Cynefin framework was subsequently used to augment the authors’ appreciation of “context” – beyond physical context to include relational context, and to evaluate students’ competency development across the four domains of “clear”, “complicated”, “complex” and “chaotic”.

Findings

This study helped the authors to understand that there was increased capacity of the students to distinguish between three important contexts for problem-solving, including an increased awareness about the importance of factual and relevant information, increased acknowledgement of the varying roles of professional practitioners in problem-solving depending on the type of problem and increased appreciation of the importance of interdisciplinary teams in tackling complex and complicated problems. There were several opportunities for such courses to be more effective in preparing students for dealing with “chaotic” situations that are prevalent in addressing the United Nations’ 17 sustainable development goals (UNSDGs). Drawing on the course-based learnings, the authors present a “context integration model” for developing problem-solving knowledge and skills.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings are important because context appreciation – including both physical context and relational context – is critical to problem-solving for the UNSDGs, including its 169 targets and 232 indicators. The research findings highlight the opportunity for the Cynefin framework to inform holistic curriculum renewal processes, enhancing an educator’s ability to design, implement and evaluate coursework that develops physical and relational context appreciation.

Practical implications

The study’s findings and context integration model can help educators develop the full range of necessary problem-solving graduate competencies, including for chaotic situations involving high degrees of uncertainty. Looking ahead, acknowledging the significant carbon footprint of global travel, the authors are interested in applying the model to a domestic and/or online format of the same course, to attempt similar learning outcomes.

Originality/value

Connecting Bloom’s taxonomy deep learning and threshold learning theory critical path learning insights with the Cynefin framework context domains, provides a novel model to evaluate competency development for problem-solving towards improved holistic physical and relational “context appreciation” outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Ben Gardner

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the capabilities of Enterprise 2.0 tools align to the tasks knowledge workers perform. The objective is to provide

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1514

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the capabilities of Enterprise 2.0 tools align to the tasks knowledge workers perform. The objective is to provide knowledge workers and information architects with a framework that enables the development of a suite of Enterprise 2.0 tools in support of knowledge management across the full knowledge lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

The capabilities of Enterprise 2.0 tools were mapped against the requirements associated with each of the four main domains (chaotic, complex, knowable and known) of the Cynefin framework.

Findings

The Cynefin model provides a useful framework for illustrating how the various tools within an Enterprise 2.0 suite support the different activities/tasks knowledge workers perform. Aligning Enterprise 2.0 tools based on the domain requirements of the Cynefin model allows the classification of these capabilities based on a task‐based framework rather than the traditional feature/function‐based ones.

Practical implications

Application of this framework will help knowledge workers and information architects understand the relationship between technical capabilities and business tasks. This understanding will help both in tool selection with respect to business problem (architects) and also provide clarity of purpose in support of change management/adoption (knowledge workers).

Originality/value

Much of the literature around understanding Enterprise 2.0 tools has focused on a classical feature/function classification. The analysis presented here provides a classification based on the Cynefin model of knowledge creation. This classification model provides a valuable tool to those interested in developing environments that enable collaboration and knowledge generation/capture using these capabilities.

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Liaquat Hossain and Shahadat Uddin

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual foundation and empirical basis for exploring issues related to the design framework for modeling coordination in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual foundation and empirical basis for exploring issues related to the design framework for modeling coordination in complex and dynamic enqvironments.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous research suggests that interactions among actors in a complex and dynamic environment tend to be more elastic, offering a higher degree of adaptability. Actions of actors in such an environment need to be coordinated to achieve the desired goal. With that purpose, the authors suggest a social network‐based (SN‐based) framework to model coordination in complex and dynamic environments.

Findings

The authors successfully applied the proposed SN‐based framework to model coordination in the context of soft‐target organization and emergency response preparedness.

Originality/value

It is apparent that much work has been done in existing studies on modeling coordination considering the specific domain situation in a complex and dynamic environment. In this paper, the authors propose a unique framework to model coordination in a complex and dynamic environment.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Todor D. Todorov

To obtain error estimates for 3D consistent boundary‐flux approximations.

Abstract

Purpose

To obtain error estimates for 3D consistent boundary‐flux approximations.

Design/methodology/approach

Isoparametric approach is used for constructing finite‐element approximations.

Findings

This research study presents a convergence analysis of 3D boundary‐flux approximations. Error estimates are proved for the approximate solutions of the problem under consideration.

Research limitations/implications

General results for a consistent boundary‐flux problem are obtained for all 3D domains with Lipschitz‐continuous boundary. This investigation will be continued studying combined effect of curved boundaries and isoparametric numerical integration. An optimal refined strategy with respect to algorithmic aspects for solving 3D boundary‐flux problem also will be considered.

Practical implications

The obtained results enable engineers to calculate the flux across the curved boundaries using finite element method (FEM).

Originality/value

The paper presents an isoparametric finite‐element method for a 3D consistent boundary‐flux problem in domains with complex geometry. The work is addressed to the possible‐related fields of interest of postgraduate students and specialists in fluid mechanics and numerical analysis.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Anthony Alexander, Helen Walker and Mohamed Naim

– This study aims to aid theory building, the use of decision theory (DT) concepts in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) research is examined.

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21080

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to aid theory building, the use of decision theory (DT) concepts in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) research is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

An abductive approach considers two DT concepts, Snowden’s Cynefin framework for sense-making and Keeney’s value-focussed decision analysis, in a systematic literature review of 160 peer-reviewed papers in English.

Findings

Around 60 per cent of the papers on decision-making in SSCM come from operational research (OR), which makes explicit use of DT. These are almost all normative and rationalist and focussed on structured decision contexts. Some exceptions seek to address unstructured decision contexts via Complex Adaptive Systems or Soft Systems Methodology. Meanwhile, a second set, around 16 per cent, comes from business ethics and are empirical, behavioural decision research. Although this set does not explicitly refer to DT, the empirical evidence here supports Keeney’s value-focussed analysis.

Research limitations/implications

There is potential for theory building in SSCM using DT, but the research only addresses SSCM research (including corporate responsibility and ethics) and not DT in SCM or wider sustainable development research.

Practical implications

Use of particular decision analysis methods for SSCM may be improved by better understanding different decision contexts.

Social implications

The research shows potential synthesis with ethical DT absent from DT and SCM research.

Originality/value

Empirical behavioural decision analysis for SSCM is considered alongside normative, rational analysis for the first time. Value-focussed DT appears useful for unstructured decision contexts found in SSCM.

Originality/value

Empirical, behavioural decision analysis for SSCM is considered alongside normative rational analysis for the first time. Value-focussed DT appears useful for unstructured decision contexts found in SSCM.

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Necdet Geren, Çağdaş Sarıgül and Melih Bayramoğlu

The generic design environment for a flexible printed‐circuit board assemblies (PCBA) remanufacturing cell contains four interrelated complex design domains. Mechanical…

Abstract

Purpose

The generic design environment for a flexible printed‐circuit board assemblies (PCBA) remanufacturing cell contains four interrelated complex design domains. Mechanical design domains are really complex and the use of well‐proven mechanical product design methodologies does not help the designer. Hence, this paper aims to develop a generic systematic design methodology for a flexible PCBA remanufacturing cell.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the use of conventional mechanical product design techniques for the design of a flexible PCBA rework (remanufacturing) cell. It indicates problems and the weaknesses when conventional product design techniques are used for the development of flexible manufacturing systems (FMS). It then provides a new systematic mechanical design methodology for designing a flexible PCBA rework (remanufacturing) cell. The design methodology is intended to be generic in order to apply successfully to any FMS design.

Findings

Conventional product design methodology cannot be used directly for the design of a flexible PCBA remanufacturing cell. Hence, two design methodologies were developed: the generic FMS mechanical design methodology and a specific FMS design methodology for a PCBA rework cell. The first one was developed based on the tasks of the conventional product design process integrated with new design tools. The generic design methodology was then extended to obtain the second methodology for a PCBA rework cell design. Both of the methodologies were applied to a flexible PCBA rework cell design problem. Both design methodologies eliminated unusable design solutions at the early design stages of the conceptual design process and made the design process easier.

Practical implications

The generic and specific design methodologies provide a better design environment, even for less specialized FMS designers.

Originality/value

The design methodologies may help for the commercialization of a flexible PCBA remanufacturing cell that may be used for SM rework and assembly.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Ruth Aylett, Gary Petley, P.W.H. Chung, James Soutter and Andrew Rushton

Operating procedure synthesis (OPS) has been used to generate plant operating procedures for chemical plants. However, the application of AI planning to this domain has…

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1199

Abstract

Operating procedure synthesis (OPS) has been used to generate plant operating procedures for chemical plants. However, the application of AI planning to this domain has been rarely considered, and when it has the scope of the system used has limited it to solving “toy” problems. This paper describes the application of state‐of‐the‐art AI planning techniques to the generation of operating procedures for chemical plant as part of the INT‐OP project at the Universities of Salford and Loughborough. The CEP planner is outlined and its application to a double effect evaporator test rig is discussed in detail. Particular attention is paid to the issues involved in domain modelling, requiring the description of the domain, development of AI planning operators, the definition of safety restrictions, and the definition of the problem. There is then a presentation of the results, lessons learned and problems still remaining.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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