Search results

1 – 10 of over 44000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

James M. Bloodgood

This paper aims to propose positive and negative firm competitiveness effects of knowledge acquisition of pertinent, irrelevant and erroneous knowledge based on its…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose positive and negative firm competitiveness effects of knowledge acquisition of pertinent, irrelevant and erroneous knowledge based on its distinctiveness, the source of knowledge and the presence of firm complements.

Design/methodology/approach

Aspects of knowledge acquisition from the innovation, knowledge and routines literatures are integrated to create propositions showing the effects of knowledge acquisition on firm competitiveness. Examples from different eras of the automobile industry are used to illustrate the propositions and demonstrate the enduring nature of these issues.

Findings

Various combinations of firm complements and knowledge type and criticality can cause significant competitive effects, such as parity, relative harm and opportunity capture, that managers should be cognizant of when planning knowledge acquisition.

Research limitations/implications

Knowledge researchers should use a more integrative, holistic approach concerning firm resources to their empirical studies. This better allows for the competitive effects of interactions between new and existing firm resources to be captured.

Practical implications

The propositions emphasize the importance of increased managerial attention and understanding of potential problems of new knowledge acquisition. Moreover, managers should pay particular attention to their firm’s existing complements when assessing knowledge acquisition benefits.

Originality/value

The positive value of firm knowledge receives substantially more research attention than the potential negative effects. This paper identifies the competitiveness effects of acquiring pertinent, irrelevant or erroneous knowledge. Increased attention on the interaction of new knowledge and complements illustrates the positive and negative effects on firms.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Political Economy of Antitrust
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-093-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kenneth Hunsader, Natalya Delcoure and Gwendolyn Pennywell

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of bankruptcy announcements on the bankrupt firm's competitors' stock returns.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of bankruptcy announcements on the bankrupt firm's competitors' stock returns.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting with a sample of Chapter 11 bankruptcies from 1980 through 2008, the authors use event study methodology to examine the returns of bankrupt firm's rivals around the filing date. The authors employ a t-test of means across groups to check for differences in returns based on a competitive strategy measure (CSM). The CSM classifies industry rivals into strategic complements or substitutes. The authors also separate the sample based on traditional or non-traditional bankruptcies and conduct explanatory regressions on the abnormal returns using economically important independent variables such as the CSM, leverage and the Herfindahl index.

Findings

Similar to previous research, the paper finds that less concentrated industries and industries with high leverage suffer greater negative wealth effects when a firm within the industry announces a bankruptcy. Extending current research, the paper finds strategic interaction within the industry is an important factor in determining industry portfolio returns. Rivals characterized as strategic complements exhibit significant negative valuation effects while rivals characterized as strategic substitutes do not. Finally, the paper finds that this strategic effect is dominant when the future cash flows and outcome of the reorganization is more uncertain as substantiated by the difference between traditional and non-traditional bankruptcy filings.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first empirical article to examine how the CSM affects the returns of bankrupt firms' rivals.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 39 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ana Paula Martins

Aims to analyse the labour market outcome when there are two unions in the industry, representing heterogeneous workers – imperfect substitutes in production.

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to analyse the labour market outcome when there are two unions in the industry, representing heterogeneous workers – imperfect substitutes in production.

Design/methodology/approach

Competition between union policies are viewed in terms of both employment and wage strategies. Results for substitutes and complements are inspected. Attention is given to the strategic behaviour of the unions, towards one another and/or the employer side. Cooperation is modelled using the Nash‐maximand approach.

Findings

Gathers some notes and enlargements to the standard collective bargaining problem in which unions maximise utility. Extends the framework to model union competition behaviour for jobs and/or employment that reproduces the standard market product analysis of imperfect competition. Focuses on heterogeneous labour.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis concentrates on the case of union duopoly, but can easily be enlarged to the n‐union setting – which is left for further investigation.

Originality/value

A simple analytical example with Stone‐Geary union utility functions and a linear labour demand system is forwarded.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nakul Parameswar and Sanjay Dhir

This paper aims to explore dynamics of post termination interaction between international joint venture (IJV) partners and empirically examines IJV level and dyad level…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore dynamics of post termination interaction between international joint venture (IJV) partners and empirically examines IJV level and dyad level factors that influence the choice of post IJV termination interaction as supplier, complement or competitor.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth literature review is undertaken to identify IJV and dyad level that could influence the choice of post termination interaction between terminated IJV partners. Hypotheses are empirically validated using multinomial logistic regression on data collected on terminated IJV headquartered in India.

Findings

The results denote that the choice of post-IJV termination interaction between IJV partners as supplier, complement or competitor is influenced by interdependence, bargaining power, foreign partner’s purpose of IJV, complementarity and type of IJV termination.

Research limitations/implications

This paper explores an under researched area in extant IJV literature that could be taken up for study by academicians. The paper upholds and strengthens the dynamic capabilities view of strategic management in IJV context.

Practical implications

This paper examines a practice adopted by businesses in emerging markets and determines important factors that influence the choice of interaction post IJV termination between partners. Practitioners will be encouraged to understand and plan post termination dynamics with their terminated IJV partner.

Originality/value

The paper undertakes examination of a practical business phenomena, i.e. interaction post termination between terminated IJV partners.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yung-Shen Yen

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction effect of information richness, retailer brand, and extended offers on customer purchase intention in e-commerce.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction effect of information richness, retailer brand, and extended offers on customer purchase intention in e-commerce.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical moderator regression analysis and simple slope analysis were used to test the hypotheses, also 356 savvy internet consumers in Taiwan were investigated.

Findings

The findings revealed that information richness, retailer brand, and extended offers are positively related to customer purchase intention. However, the interaction effects may differ in these relationships. While information richness complements both retailer brand and extended offers on customer purchase intention, extended offers may substitute retailer brand for increase in purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

A bias may exist because of the sample from an online survey. The findings suggest that complements are actually synergistic strategies of factors, while substitution is a switching of the alternative.

Practical implications

Practitioners shall utilize information richness to the complements, such as retailer brand and extended offers, to strengthen customer purchase intention. In contrast, they may provide extended offers for acquiring customers in the short-term period, when retailer brand is relatively low or unknown.

Originality/value

The findings of the study provide a new marketing strategy: managing substitutes and complements in adequate factors can give rise to better results for purchase intention increases in e-commerce.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Helge Thorbjørnsen, Per E. Pedersen and Herbjørn Nysveen

This paper aims to investigate the properties and attributes of networked services and to propose a general categorization scheme for such services.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the properties and attributes of networked services and to propose a general categorization scheme for such services.

Design/methodology/approach

Two separate studies were conducted to test the validity and applicability of the categorization scheme. First, industry experts categorized a set of pre‐selected mobile services based on the services' dominant source of value. Second, a large‐scale end‐user study of the same services was conducted for testing cross‐service differences between the proposed service categories in terms of what drives perceived customer value. It is argued that services can be categorized on the basis of whether their dominant source of value stems from intrinsic, user network, or complement network attributes.

Findings

The study results largely support the proposed categorization scheme. The two studies suggest that categorizing networked services as driven by either intrinsic, user network, or complement network attributes is fruitful and helps pinpoint fundamentally different drivers of perceived customer value. The drivers investigated in the end‐user study explain 60 percent of the variance in customer value.

Research limitations/implications

The current categorization scheme will have stronger and clearer implications when the full array of antecedents and consequences of intrinsic, user network, and complement network attributes have been investigated.

Practical implications

The categorization scheme may provide managers with important guidelines regarding the kinds of business models and marketing means that will work best for the three different categories of networked services.

Originality/value

The paper contributes with a conceptual framework for understanding and categorizing both extrinsic and intrinsic drivers of service value. It extends and integrates previous work on network effects and adoption research and also offers empirical insight into an under‐researched topic.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Markus Clemens, Sebastian Scho¨ps, Herbert De Gersem and Andreas Bartel

The space discretization of eddy‐current problems in the magnetic vector potential formulation leads to a system of differential‐algebraic equations. They are typically…

Abstract

Purpose

The space discretization of eddy‐current problems in the magnetic vector potential formulation leads to a system of differential‐algebraic equations. They are typically time discretized by an implicit method. This requires the solution of large linear systems in the Newton iterations. The authors seek to speed up this procedure. In most relevant applications, several materials are non‐conducting and behave linearly, e.g. air and insulation materials. The corresponding matrix system parts remain constant but are repeatedly solved during Newton iterations and time‐stepping routines. The paper aims to exploit invariant matrix parts to accelerate the system solution.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the principle “reduce, reuse, recycle”, the paper proposes a Schur complement method to precompute a factorization of the linear parts. In 3D models this decomposition requires a regularization in non‐conductive regions. Therefore, the grad‐div regularization is revisited and tailored such that it takes anisotropies into account.

Findings

The reduced problem exhibits a decreased effective condition number. Thus, fewer preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations are necessary. Numerical examples show a decrease of the overall simulation time, if the step size is small enough. 3D simulations with large time step sizes might not benefit from this approach, because the better condition does not compensate for the computational costs of the direct solvers used for the Schur complement. The combination of the Schur approach with other more sophisticated preconditioners or multigrid solvers is subject to current research.

Originality/value

The Schur complement method is adapted for the eddy‐current problem. Therefore, a new partitioning approach into linear/non‐linear and static/dynamic domains is proposed. Furthermore, a new variant of the grad‐div gauging is introduced that allows for anisotropies and enables the Schur complement method in 3D.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kenneth J. Hunsader and Gwendolyn Pennywell

Conventional wisdom implies that firms manage earnings to maximize the wealth of the manager, the value of the firm and/or the amount of information in the market. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Conventional wisdom implies that firms manage earnings to maximize the wealth of the manager, the value of the firm and/or the amount of information in the market. The purpose of this paper is to offer an additional explanation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using companies from the Standard & Poor's 500 index and an annual report disclosure ranking, the authors employ a standard t‐test of means across groups to check for differences in disclosure based on a competitive strategy measure (CSM). The CSM classifies industry rivals into strategic complements or substitutes. The authors also test for differences in earnings management using discretionary accruals and using event study methodology examine how stock returns respond to the Sarbanes‐Oxley Act.

Findings

The authors show that earnings management is a tool used by firms based on the level of competitive strategy within the industry. It was found that firms competing as strategic substitutes are more likely to actively engage in earnings management through discretionary accruals when the informational environment permits. It was also found that substitute firms suffer greater negative wealth effects than complement firms in response to the Sarbanes‐Oxley Act.

Originality/value

This is one of the first empirical articles to examine how competitive strategy affects earnings management and the stock market response to the Sarbanes‐Oxley Act of 2002.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Justin Doran and Geraldine Ryan

Eco-innovation is any form of product, process or organisational innovation that contributes towards sustainable development. Firms can eco-innovate in a variety of ways…

Abstract

Purpose

Eco-innovation is any form of product, process or organisational innovation that contributes towards sustainable development. Firms can eco-innovate in a variety of ways. The purpose of this paper is to identify nine different eco-innovation activities – including such items as reducing material use per unit of output, reducing energy use per unit of output, reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) “footprint” – and the authors ask whether these act as substitutes or complements to one another.

Design/methodology/approach

Eco-innovation is any form of product, process or organisational innovation that contributes towards sustainable development. Firms can eco-innovate in a variety of ways. In this paper the authors identify nine different eco-innovation activities – including such items as reducing material use per unit of output, reducing energy use per unit of output, reducing CO2 “footprint” – and the authors ask whether these act as substitutes or complements to one another.

Findings

Introducing only one eco-innovation activity has little payoff (in terms of turnover per worker) with only those firms who reduce their CO2 “footprint” having higher levels of turnover per worker. When introducing more than one eco-innovation activity the authors find that certain eco-innovation activities complement one another (e.g. reducing material use within the firm at the same time as improving the ability to recycle the product after use) others act as substitutes (e.g. reducing material use within the firm at the same time as recycling waste, water or materials within the firm).

Practical implications

The results suggest that firms can maximise their productive capacity by considering specific combinations of eco-innovation. This suggests that firms should plan to introduce eco-innovation which act as complements, thereby, boosting productivity. It also suggests that eco-innovation stimuli, introduced by policy makers, should be targeted at complementary eco-innovations.

Originality/value

The paper analyses whether eco-innovations act as complements or substitutes. While a number of studies have analysed the importance of eco-innovation for firm performance, few have assessed the extent to which diverse types of eco-innovation interact with each other to complement or substitute for one another.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 44000