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Article

Kenneth Simmonds

Concerns itself with competitive position accounting measurement, stating that it is a much more complex task, however, than devising a standard procedure for measuring…

Abstract

Concerns itself with competitive position accounting measurement, stating that it is a much more complex task, however, than devising a standard procedure for measuring competitive position. States that changes in competitive position generally build gradually, ebbing and flowing. Argues that a competitor's sales revenue is perhaps the most important of all competitive indicators and that estimation of this for firms and markets must be prime in developing a strategic management accounting system. Adds that market share provides a link between accounting performance of the single period for which the share is measured and the performance of future periods. Sums up by showing within this article that accounting representation of a firm's competitive position within an industry is possible by using quite basic accounting measurements. Goes on to say there is much development needed to refine methods of accounting for competitors, but the resulting change in the role of accountants will be immense.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part

Javier Gimeno, Ming-Jer Chen and Jonghoon Bae

We investigate the dynamics of competitive repositioning of firms in the deregulated U.S. airline industry (1979–1995) in terms of a firm's target market, strategic…

Abstract

We investigate the dynamics of competitive repositioning of firms in the deregulated U.S. airline industry (1979–1995) in terms of a firm's target market, strategic posture, and resource endowment relative to other firms in the industry. We suggest that, despite strong inertia in competitive positions, the direction of repositioning responds to external and internal alignment considerations. For external alignment, we examined how firms changed their competitive positioning to mimic the positions of similar, successful firms, and to differentiate themselves when experiencing intense rivalry. For internal alignment, we examined how firms changed their position in each dimension to align with the other dimensions of positioning. This internal alignment led to convergent positioning moves for firms with similar resource endowments and strategic postures, and divergent moves for firms with similar target markets and strategic postures. The evidence suggests that repositioning moves in terms of target markets and resource endowments are more sensitive to external and internal alignment considerations, but that changes in strategic posture are subject to very high inertia and do not appear to respond well to alignment considerations.

Details

Ecology and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-435-5

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Article

John R. Darling

Focuses on the importance of successful competitive positioning in the European consumer market. Presents a model for establishing a competitive position in the minds of…

Abstract

Focuses on the importance of successful competitive positioning in the European consumer market. Presents a model for establishing a competitive position in the minds of consumers. Proposes that the model presented will help marketing executives achieve a better competition position in the European market by the successful use of components and elements which it has identified.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article

Rainer Feurer and Kazem Chaharbaghi

Although the notion of competitiveness lies at the heart of businessstrategy development, its definition is often vague and does not lenditself to a measurement process…

Abstract

Although the notion of competitiveness lies at the heart of business strategy development, its definition is often vague and does not lend itself to a measurement process. The competitiveness of an organization depends on a number of factors which are interrelated and cannot be looked at in isolation. The main factors include: customer values, shareholder values and ability to act and react within a competitive environment. Proposes a holistic approach for defining competitiveness together with a mapping process which encompasses different dimensions of competitiveness. The mapping process enables the measurement of competitiveness while highlighting the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within a competitive environment which form the basis of business strategy formulation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Giovanni Pino, Gianluigi Guido, Alessandro M. Peluso and Marco Pichierri

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on place marketing by focusing on the concept of strategic needs, i.e. the set of strategic priorities that a place could…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on place marketing by focusing on the concept of strategic needs, i.e. the set of strategic priorities that a place could achieve in a medium- to long-term horizon to improve its development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research examines the strategic needs of four local territorial systems (LTSs), i.e. clusters of municipalities that share social, economic and spatial similarities, located in a southern Italian province, through an analysis of their competitive positioning over three temporal instants.

Findings

For each LTS, the analysis identified a number of development goals that local policymakers could pursue and the strategies most suitable to achieve the said goals.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a new methodological approach to set the development goals of local areas based on the simultaneous assessment of their attractiveness and competitive capacity.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Book part

Mario Rese and Birgit Engel

The aim of both marketing theorists and resource-based view proponents is to explain the creation and the sustainability of competitive advantages (Srivastava et al.…

Abstract

The aim of both marketing theorists and resource-based view proponents is to explain the creation and the sustainability of competitive advantages (Srivastava et al., 2001, p. 777). What has not been considered so far is the role of exploitation positions within the competitive game. The purpose of this article is to investigate the consequences of a strategy concerning the active creation of exploitation positions on the side of the customers. The reason for this is the observed tendency in several industries – elevators, paper machines, gas turbines – to actively create such positions. The underlying assumption is that this strategy leads to a competitive advantage for the initial transaction as well as to higher profits for the supplier taking into account the entire relationship. Mainly the second advantage of a higher profit depends heavily on the sustainability of an exploitation position. Therefore, this paper identifies the drivers controlling the sustainability of an exploitation position. In order to derive a broad understanding three different theoretical approaches – Transaction Cost Economics, the Resource-Based View, and Market Process Theory (Austrian Economics) – will be used to explain the effects of exploitation on the competitive position and the profit of the supplier. Finally, the outcome of this paper is threefold: First, the competitive consequences of an exploitation strategy will be identified. Second, the impact of each theoretical approach on the question of exploitation will be analyzed. Third, the integrative potential of the three different theoretical approaches will be examined. More precisely, we discuss institutional economics and information asymmetry in a truly dynamic setting and the impact of radical ignorance and alertness on the idea of isolating mechanisms. This will be done in a parallel discussion of the problems in general and along one case study which focuses on the elevator market.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Managing Interfirm Interactions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-169-9

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Article

Marian Gorynia

The paper has two aims. The first one is to present a three‐dimensional concept of competitiveness of an enterprise. The concept of firm competitiveness discussed in the…

Abstract

The paper has two aims. The first one is to present a three‐dimensional concept of competitiveness of an enterprise. The concept of firm competitiveness discussed in the paper covers three dimensions: • competitive position of an enterprise, • competitive potential of an enterprise, • competitive strategy of an enterprise. Each of the above‐mentioned dimensions was subject to operationalization — sets of variables describing particular dimensions of firm competitiveness were suggested. The second aim of the paper is to present the results of empirical studies on the competitiveness of Polish firms in comparison with the European Union firms in the light of Poland's anticipated entry into the EU. The research is based on the concept of firm competitiveness developed in the first part of the paper. The studies were carried out in the year 2000 and included 68 firms of the manufacturing industry registered in Poland. The results obtained indicate that according to managers from those 68 enterprises, there is a significant competitive gap between the Polish firms and their rivals from the EU. This gap concerns all the three dimensions of firm competitiveness: competitive position, competitive potential and competitive strategy.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article

Joseph W.K. Chan

Sets out an exploratory study to give an alternative viewpoint of manufacturing logistics.

Abstract

Purpose

Sets out an exploratory study to give an alternative viewpoint of manufacturing logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on causal analysis, the relationship between competitive strategy and manufacturing logistics was explored. Variables, including both positioning and competitive dimensions, in the competitive strategy that interacted with manufacturing logistics were identified. The elements of manufacturing logistics for this study included master production scheduling, capacity requirements planning, material planning, purchasing, and inventory control. A weighted business performance index was used to segregate the sample firms into three groups: high‐, average‐, and low‐performing organizations. For each of the performance group, the causal relationships between strategic elements and the performance of manufacturing logistics were then analyzed.

Findings

The results showed a significant relationship between competitive strategy and manufacturing logistics system performance.

Research/limitations/implications

Not all the elements in manufacturing logistics may contribute to the logistics performance. The construct of manufacturing logistics depends on a particular set of strategic variables that the organization designs.

Originality/value

Extends the study of manufacturing logistics beyond its boundary through a broader strategic perspective.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article

Harald Pechlaner, Egon Smeral and Kurt Matzier

Destinations are strategic marketing units which consist of territorially delimited, consolidated areas of co‐operation. Options to improve a destination's competitive

Abstract

Destinations are strategic marketing units which consist of territorially delimited, consolidated areas of co‐operation. Options to improve a destination's competitive edge depend on the determinants of competitiveness. A destination's competitive position can be explained by factor conditions and conditions of demand, quality and structure of sectors involved, strategies as well as market and organizational structures. The competitive system depicted above forms the basis for the creation of “customer value” and therefore is a source of future competitive advantages. Customer value is the gap perceived by the customer between the perceived (multidimensional) benefit and the perceived (multidimensional) costs/prices of a destination compared to its competitors. The aim of the article is the explanation of “Customer Value Management” as a key strategy to affect a destination's competitive position by means of supply‐side measures as well as the communicated and achievable relative consumption/cost position.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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