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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Mantas Vilkas, Inga Stankevice and Rimantas Rauleckas

Cumulative capability models are dominating frameworks explaining how manufacturing organizations gain their performance capabilities, such as quality, delivery…

Abstract

Purpose

Cumulative capability models are dominating frameworks explaining how manufacturing organizations gain their performance capabilities, such as quality, delivery, flexibility and cost. When innovation capabilities are excluded from the framework, the models are incapable of explaining how companies sustain substantive capabilities in a changing environment. Responding to this gap, the purpose of this paper is to propose and test a “sand cone” cumulative capability model that includes the innovation competitive performance alongside the competitive performance of quality, delivery flexibility and cost.

Design/methodology/approach

Two competing cumulative models were proposed. The extended cumulative capability model hypothesizes the development of innovation in sequence with other competitive performance dimensions. The affected with innovation cumulative model hypothesizes innovation performance as a predecessor of other performance dimensions. The models were tested using a multimethod approach on a representative sample of 500 manufacturing companies. An analysis of correlations among competitive performance, frequencies of plants following prescribed sequences, fit statistics of covariance-based structural equation modeling and analysis of strength and statistical significance of path coefficients enabled us to select a model that best represents the collected data.

Findings

The findings reveal that innovation competitive performance operates as a predecessor of quality, delivery, flexibility and cost and is developed in relation to these performance dimensions. The modified model also provides a theoretical explanation of how innovation performance helps to sustain reliable production systems that can perform consistently over time within a tolerable range of quality, delivery, flexibility and cost performance.

Practical implications

The results are significant for practitioners, especially for companies that are operating in volatile environments because the results provide insight on how to develop innovation competitive performance in relation to quality, delivery, flexibility and cost performance.

Originality/value

This study extends the cumulative capability models with innovation competitive performance. It advances the contingency approach on cumulative capability models.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Daniel I. Prajogo and Peggy McDermott

This paper aims to examine the ten competitive dimensions of service in terms of relative importance and contribution to business performance, using the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the ten competitive dimensions of service in terms of relative importance and contribution to business performance, using the Importance‐Performance Analysis (IPA) matrix.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data for this study was drawn from 190 managers of Australian service organisations, with primary responsibilities related to day‐to‐day corporate operations. The targeted service organisations encompassed various sectors, including: transportation, communications, banking, insurance, health care, education, wholesale, retail, and professional services.

Findings

Based on the four quadrants of the IPA matrix, the results suggest that customer retention and productivity need to be maintained, while innovation and speed may receive a lower priority. Brand image and cost‐effectiveness fall into the areas which need improvement, while quality by conformance and delivery are identified as “potential overkillers”. Furthermore, this paper tests the difference between high‐ and low‐performing firms and shows that low‐performing firms generally place a similar level of importance on the ten competitive dimensions as high‐performing ones, yet are not successful in converting what is important into performance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to strategic management in service organisations by mapping the level of importance of the ten competitive dimensions of service against their effectiveness in improving business performance.

Practical implications

The findings could help firms identify the competitive dimensions within their organisation that are effectively‐resourced, under‐resourced, or over‐resourced and provide guidance for, “fighting the good fight”.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to knowledge by identifying the competitive priorities held by service firms and their effectiveness in improving business performance.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Cinzia Sansone, Per Hilletofth and David Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate systematically the topic of operations capabilities within the operations strategy area. The output is a framework that will…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate systematically the topic of operations capabilities within the operations strategy area. The output is a framework that will benefit researchers and firms to gain a more complete understanding of critical operations capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology is a systematic literature review. The aim of this study is to provide a snapshot of the diversity of studies being conducted in the field of operations capabilities, within the operations strategy area. In total, 157 papers were taken into consideration. Various operations capabilities were identified and synthesized in a conceptual framework.

Findings

The output of this paper is a conceptual framework of critical operations capabilities. Different operations capabilities and dimensions were identified in the literature. In total, seven dimensions were identified and included in the framework: cost, quality, delivery, flexibility, service, innovation, and environment.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted through a systematic literature review. The framework presented in this paper provides a summary of critical operations capabilities, and in addition theoretical support for managers and firms wishing to formulate an operations strategy.

Practical implications

In general, this research sets the basis for managers and practitioners concerning the formulation of successful operations strategies. In the long term, a deeper understanding and shared knowledge about competitive priorities and operations capabilities can positively influence the success of firms.

Originality/value

This paper extends the theory by providing researchers and managers with updated knowledge on operations capabilities.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Luiz Moutinho and Douglas Brownlie

Portfolio analysis has been subjected to considerable scrutiny in recentyears. Describes an attempt to recast it in the light of past criticismsand the unyielding…

Abstract

Portfolio analysis has been subjected to considerable scrutiny in recent years. Describes an attempt to recast it in the light of past criticisms and the unyielding importance of competitive considerations to marketing decision making. It does not introduce another new portfolio matrix. Rather it describes a broadly based approach that gives users more control over portfolio design and analysis. Describes a data‐driven approach to the analysis of competitive position that has its origins in a portfolio‐based methodology previously described by Moutinho in 1987. The Stratlogic approach is not driven by a pre‐specified portfolio model and its derived matrix. Instead it involves users in a procedure that combines multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. Inputs include empirical data on the scope and resourcing of marketing strategies as well as the performance of players in a defined competitive set. Describes the proposed methodology. It also draws attention to some technical and managerial issues that arise from the flexibility and control that the stratlogic approach affords the user. This work is part of a programme of funded research into the development of expert systems for areas of strategic marketing decision making.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Gregory N. Stock, Noel P. Greis and John D. Kasarda

Presents a framework for explaining the relationship between strategy, structure, and logistics in the context of a changing environment. In response to new competitive

Abstract

Presents a framework for explaining the relationship between strategy, structure, and logistics in the context of a changing environment. In response to new competitive pressures, a manufacturing enterprise is emerging in which resources may now be dispersed worldwide. As distances between production facilities and pressures for fast delivery increase, the coordination of these dispersed manufacturing resources becomes a critical activity. Argues that logistics is well‐positioned to assume a unique role in bridging strategy and structure in the new manufacturing environment. Develops a new model of the strategy‐structure relationship that recognizes the integral role that logistics will play in creating the “fit” necessary to achieve competitive success. The framework suggests that performance will be higher when the firm’s strategy and structure are consistent with the strengths inherent in the firm’s logistics choices.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Ronald L. Schill and David N. McArthur

Introduces a decision framework for making strategic competitivechoices beyond the product‐brand, business unit, or corporate levels ofanalysis. It adds a fourth dimension

Abstract

Introduces a decision framework for making strategic competitive choices beyond the product‐brand, business unit, or corporate levels of analysis. It adds a fourth dimension: the multi‐organizational strategic competitive unit which is responsible for planning and implementing competitive strategy in the global marketplace. Long‐range competitive success can no longer be achieved by a single company, and in recent years, the relevant competitive unit has shifted from the company to the larger competitive system of companies aligned in strategic collaborations for competitive advantage. For example, no longer is competition between one auto assembler and another, but between Toyota and its Keiretsu programme of global networking and strategic alliances with suppliers and other competitors against Ford and General Motors and their relative commitment to the more narrowly focused corporate competitive unit.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Gunjan Soni and Rambabu Kodali

This paper aims to explore the state of strategic fit between “competitive strategy” (CS) and “supply chain strategy” (SCS) in the Indian manufacturing industry by

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the state of strategic fit between “competitive strategy” (CS) and “supply chain strategy” (SCS) in the Indian manufacturing industry by investigating the mediating role of supply chain strategy between competitive strategy and performance of company/supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This aim is accomplished by using a survey questionnaire that was answered by 185 respondents from various sectors of Indian manufacturing industry. These sectors included automobile, electrical and electronics, process, machinery, textile, food, aviation and footwear sectors. The state of strategic fit is explored based on research framework of “matrix of strategic fit”.

Findings

The major findings revealed existence of a causal relationship between CS and SCS with CS as independent variable and SCS as dependent variable. It was also found that choice of CS and SCS affects business and supply chain performance. The other finding was establishment of the existence of strategic fit in Indian manufacturing industry, which was explained by analyzing the interaction effect between CS and SCS. It was also found that a major hurdle in implementing SCM practices in Indian manufacturing industry is “overcoming traditional practices”.

Originality/value

Indian manufacturing industry is growing by leaps and bounds, but to date there is no study that has explored the mediation effect of supply chain strategy between competitive strategy and performance in India. This paper provides a research framework to study and assess these dimensions of strategy on “matrix of strategic fit”.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Julie T. Johnson and James W. Busbin

Businesses succeed or fail based on competitive advantage. Over the course of business history a number of innovative business practices have earned the distinction of…

Abstract

Businesses succeed or fail based on competitive advantage. Over the course of business history a number of innovative business practices have earned the distinction of being “milestones” in competitive advantage. Examples of such groundbreaking competitive developments include portfolio strategies in product management and restructuring companies specifically to gain competitiveness. In the early 1990s “Time‐Based Competition” was proposed by Stalk and Hout to be a new major dimension of competition. The book on this subject by these authors, Competing Against Time, (1990) is regarded as a classic work in competitive strategy. In essence, time‐based competition focuses on gaining advantage by being faster than competitors—faster in responding to market changes, faster with new product development and introductions, faster in integrating new technology into products, and faster in distribution and customer service. Success stories of time‐based competitors are numerous; for example the Japanese used time‐based competition as a fundamental component of their automobile manufacturing strategy that caught U.S. firms off guard. Just as time‐based competition matured as a competitive strategy the Internet, World Wide Web and other “virtual” communications links have emerged, proliferated and profoundly impacted competitive strategy. This paper proposes a new dimension of competitive advantage to be called “virtual marketing.” Virtual marketing could be a new milestone in competitive strategy much like time‐based competition.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Hao Ma

Competitive advantage is perhaps the most widely used term in strategic management, yet it remains poorly defined and operationalized. This paper makes three observations…

Abstract

Competitive advantage is perhaps the most widely used term in strategic management, yet it remains poorly defined and operationalized. This paper makes three observations regarding competitive advantage and conceptually explores the various patterns of relationship between competitive advantage and firm performance. First, competitive advantage does not equate to superior performance. Second, competitive advantage is a relational term. Third, it is context‐specific. This paper examines three patterns of relationship between competitive advantage and firm performance: 1) competitive advantage leading to superior performance; 2) competitive advantage without superior performance, and 3) superior performance without competitive advantage. The ultimate purpose of this article is to help generate a healthy debate among strategy scholars on the usefulness of the competitive advantage construct for our theory building and testing. This paper proposes that we re‐examine the notion of competitive advantage and formally assess its usefulness for theory building and testing in the field of Strategic Management. The notion of competitive advantage has been a cornerstone of our field. As such, research on competitive advantage occupies a central position in strategy literature (e.g., Porter, 1980, 1985; Rumelt, 1984, 1987; Barney, 1986, 1991; Ghemawat, 1986, 1991; Peteraf, 1993; Teece, Pisano, & Shuen, 1997). However, the notion of competitive advantage itself has rarely been systematically addressed and, to date, remains poorly defined and operationalized. Is competitive advantage what it takes to compete, a characterization observed during competition, or an outcome of competition? Is competitive advantage contingent on the competitive situation or is it a more general trait of the firm? Put differently, how is competitive advantage different from competence, strengths and, ultimately, performance? This article, addressing the above questions, makes three observations regarding competitive advantage. First, competitive advantage does not equate to (superior) performance. Second, competitive advantage is a relational construct. Third, competitive advantage is context‐specific. In presenting these three observations, this article proposes suggestions to refine and operationalize “competitive advantage.” It then conceptually explores the relationship between competitive advantage and performance, which is argued to be much more complex than it is currently being treated in the literature. Concluding remarks follow.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Michael Bayer, Anders Haug and Lars Hvam

Information technology (IT), combined with complementary resources, can contribute to companies' competitive positioning. However, to assess the contribution of IT to…

Abstract

Purpose

Information technology (IT), combined with complementary resources, can contribute to companies' competitive positioning. However, to assess the contribution of IT to value with respect to the contribution of complementary resources, it is crucial to understand the means by which IT creates value.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper synthesizes empirical research on the inherent capabilities of IT and their moderating role to build an integrative model.

Findings

We found that IT creates value through three inherent capabilities: transactional, exchange and codification capabilities. These capabilities can be regarded as moderators of the relationship between IT and competitive advantage. This moderating role of IT in competitive positioning is illustrated by examples from previous empirical publications.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to IT business value (ITBV) literature by developing an integrative model that (1) conceptualizes an aspect of IT value creation, which, thus far, has received only limited attention (namely, inherent capabilities) and (2) illustrates the moderating role of these capabilities in competitive positioning.

Practical implications

Inherent capabilities provide the theoretical foundation for a nuanced understanding of IT contribution with respect to complementary resources. This understanding may support IT executives in deriving adequate measurements and, thus, account for the differential effects of IT.

Originality/value

Compared to the literature, the proposed model represents a more coherent and holistic perspective of ITBV. Thus, the model may constitute a foundation for future ITBV research and promote more detailed analytic perspectives of ITBV.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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