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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Rebecca J. White and Kevin Moore

Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing disciplines at colleges and universities today. Programs span campuses offering traditional coursework and a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing disciplines at colleges and universities today. Programs span campuses offering traditional coursework and a variety of experiential learning options for students from all majors. While most agree that as much learning, if not more, occurs outside of the classroom, there has not been a model for integrating curricular and cocurricular components in entrepreneurship programs. Moreover, there has not been clear agreement on how to assess value from these programs.

Methodology/approach

To resolve this, we used a five-phase competency development process to create a customized learning model that engages the learner, the educator, and the community volunteer in the learning and assessment process at both the individual and program levels. This chapter presents a case study in a private, metropolitan university of 8200 students. The case study presents the problem and rationale, a history and overview of the application of competency-based education, and a five-stage process used to develop the model and apply the model to achieve a customized learning path for students in entrepreneurship.

Findings

The five-stage model of competency-based education can be applied to develop a customized learning approach and assessment path for students who study entrepreneurship. The use of a technology support platform can extend and simplify the use of this model and allow for the integration of curricular and cocurricular components of an experiential education.

Originality/value

This is a unique approach to integrating curricular and cocurricular education to provide a holistic experiential education for learners. The value of this program extends to faculty who assess learning and volunteers who participate in the learning experience. Specific attention is given to the challenges and process for curriculum mapping and the use of this model for assessment.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Steven Vaughn Cates, Sean Doyle, Lisa Gallagher, Gary Shelton, Noel Broman and Blake Escudier

The purpose of this paper is to present a competency-based curriculum design model based on a set of ten foundational professional competencies (PCs) that prepare college…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a competency-based curriculum design model based on a set of ten foundational professional competencies (PCs) that prepare college graduates to meet the needs of global businesses now and in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This phenomenological single-case study reviews literature on the foundational principles of competency-based education (CBE) and comparatively analyzes the results of qualitative interviews to create a set of ten PCs linking employee and business success.

Findings

This study presents a theoretical competency-based curriculum model (competency-based learning, performance and behavior (CBLPB)) designed for online education programs to enable a twenty-first century workforce to succeed. The curriculum design model is tested as applied by the researchers in various courses taught at an online university.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual model for testing in academic research settings in colleges and universities.

Practical implications

The study suggests that higher education business curriculum should be designed using a CBE model to develop graduates with the foundational PCs that employers need and desire in educated working professionals.

Originality/value

From the faculty perspective, the CBLPB curriculum design model can enhance the design and implementation of CBE in business programs.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Gholamreza Emad and Wolff Michael Roth

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the contradictions in the current maritime education and training system (MET), which is based on competency‐based education

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the contradictions in the current maritime education and training system (MET), which is based on competency‐based education, training and assessment, and to theorize the failure to make the training useful.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of education and training in the international maritime domain was conducted. Data sources include historical documents, rules and regulations concerning MET, syllabi, handouts, sample questions, field notes, an ethnographic study in a maritime college and interviews conducted with experienced mariners and course lecturer.

Findings

There are contradictions in the education and training system that do not allow the targeted objectives to be fulfilled. Fundamentally, the assessment system has changed the objectives of the education and training practices from learning skills and knowledge required on‐board ships to passing competency examinations.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this research is valuable for the International Maritime Organization, marine administration and maritime training institutes to think over the competency‐based system in practice today and how to improve the present maritime training and assessment system in order to achieve its authentic objectives.

Originality/value

This research identified and bridged the gap in literature and research of competency‐based training and assessment in the maritime domain and provides practical solutions for improving this system.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Ming-Ka Chan, Diane de Camps Meschino, Deepak Dath, Jamiu Busari, Jordan David Bohnen, Lindy Michelle Samson, Anne Matlow and Melchor Sánchez-Mendiola

This paper aims to highlight the importance of leadership development for all physicians within a competency-based medical education (CBME) framework. It describes the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the importance of leadership development for all physicians within a competency-based medical education (CBME) framework. It describes the importance of timely international collaboration as a key strategy in promoting physician leadership development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores published and Grey literature around physician leadership development and proposes that international collaboration will meet the expanding call for development of leadership competencies in postgraduate medical learners. Two grounding frameworks were used: complexity science supports adding physician leadership training to the current momentum of CBME adoption, and relational cultural theory supports the engagement of diverse stakeholders in multiple jurisdictions around the world to ensure inclusivity in leadership education development.

Findings

An international collaborative identified key insights regarding the need to frame physician leadership education within a competency-based model.

Practical implications

International collaboration can be a vehicle for developing a globally relevant, generalizable physician leadership curriculum. This model can be expanded to encourage innovation, scholarship and program evaluation.

Originality/value

A competency-based leadership development curriculum is being designed by an international collaborative. The curriculum is based on established leadership and education frameworks. The international collaboration model provides opportunities for ongoing sharing, networking and diversification.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Robert Albanese

Information that might be helpful to those who are considering thedesirability of teaching competency‐based management education (CBME) ispresented. The underlying…

Abstract

Information that might be helpful to those who are considering the desirability of teaching competency‐based management education (CBME) is presented. The underlying assumptions of CBME are identified, its emergence is placed in a broader educational context, three major views of managerial competencies are discussed and several practical CBME implementation issues are raised.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Julianne K. Wolfe and David W. Andrews

The purpose of this paper is to identify the changing role of higher education as it adapts to the information age. The article posits that a personalized, competency-based

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846

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the changing role of higher education as it adapts to the information age. The article posits that a personalized, competency-based model will be the most successful.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on research and observations of post-secondary education. It relies on existing literature and comparisons across disciplines to demonstrate the need for change and the ability for universities to adapt to the current needs.

Findings

Universities will focus less on information dissemination and more on increasing the quality of available information; improving programs and processes for learners; and ensuring that all learners receive, analyze and apply knowledge that will allow them to be successful in their fields. The paper describes the evidence for these needs and potential pathways for competence.

Practical implications

Learners in the information age look to universities for different roles than in the past. Universities must be able to respond to learners’ preferences and needs, connecting with industries to determine best practices and training skills.

Originality/value

This is an original work. This paper draws on existing literature and the expertise of education leaders involved in many national and regional associations on the future of education.

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Book part
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Chrystina Russell and Nina Weaver

Higher education can offer hope and a way forward for vulnerable populations. In particular, access to internationally recognized degrees and credentials has the potential…

Abstract

Higher education can offer hope and a way forward for vulnerable populations. In particular, access to internationally recognized degrees and credentials has the potential to be a key protection priority for refugee populations, opening alternative solutions to displacement through economic empowerment and increased mobility.

While innovations in online learning have opened new pathways, the delivery of higher education to refugee learners in resource-deprived settings – including camps and urban environments – remains notoriously challenging. Therefore, there is an imperative to draw upon lessons learned from existing programs in order to identify promising practices and emerging innovations.

In this chapter, we draw on our experiences of developing a higher education model for refugee and vulnerable learners to argue that successful delivery of accredited degrees to populations affected by forced displacement relies upon the following three key elements:

  • 1)

    Flexible mode of degree delivery and assessment.

  • 2)

    Robust blended learning model with in-person academic support.

  • 3)

    Provision of adaptive and context-specific interventions and resources.

Flexible mode of degree delivery and assessment.

Robust blended learning model with in-person academic support.

Provision of adaptive and context-specific interventions and resources.

The case study for this chapter is an initiative called the Global Education Movement at Southern New Hampshire University, which delivers accredited degrees to refugee and refugee-hosting populations in five countries. Evidence from the program in Rwanda, operated in partnership with a local partner, Kepler, suggests it is possible for a full degree program to be successful in reaching vulnerable learners, including refugees.

Details

Language, Teaching, and Pedagogy for Refugee Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-799-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Sandra Turner, Ming-Ka Chan, Judy McKimm, Graham Dickson and Timothy Shaw

Doctors play a central role in leading improvements to healthcare systems. Leadership knowledge and skills are not inherent, however, and need to be learned. General…

Abstract

Purpose

Doctors play a central role in leading improvements to healthcare systems. Leadership knowledge and skills are not inherent, however, and need to be learned. General frameworks for medical leadership guide curriculum development in this area. Explicit discipline-linked competency sets and programmes provide context for learning and likely enhance specialty trainees’ capability for leadership at all levels. The aim of this review was to summarise the scholarly literature available around medical specialty-specific competency-based curricula for leadership in the post-graduate training space.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature search method was applied using the Medline, EMBASE and ERIC (education) online databases. Documents were reviewed for a complete match to the research question. Partial matches to the study topic were noted for comparison.

Findings

In this study, 39 articles were retrieved in full text for detailed examination, of which 32 did not comply with the full inclusion criteria. Seven articles defining discipline-linked competencies/curricula specific to medical leadership training were identified. These related to the areas of emergency medicine, general practice, maternal and child health, obstetrics and gynaecology, pathology, radiology and radiation oncology. Leadership interventions were critiqued in relation to key features of their design, development and content, with reference to modern leadership concepts.

Practical implications

There is limited discipline-specific guidance for the learning and teaching of leadership within medical specialty training programmes. The competency sets identified through this review may aid the development of learning interventions and tools for other medical disciplines.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide a baseline for the further development, implementation and evaluation work required to embed leadership learning across all medical specialty training programmes.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Laura A. Thorsell

The purpose of this paper is to examine Graduate Certificates in colleges in Ontario, Canada, and their distinctive ability to generate intrinsic student engagement in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Graduate Certificates in colleges in Ontario, Canada, and their distinctive ability to generate intrinsic student engagement in specialized skills development, and a culture of progression and scholarship.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a review of selected literature on student engagement. While extrinsic motivation, such as employment, has most often been discussed this paper purposefully considers intrinsic motivation and factors that build deeper engagement in students. This paper compares and contrasts the literature, and its link with the features of the Ontario College Graduate Certificate in Canada. More specifically, it examines the background and development of the credential in the context of the movement towards competency-based education.

Findings

This paper postulates that colleges can uniquely provide applied and intrinsically engaging programming through credentials like the Graduate Certificate. The Graduate Certificate helps heighten graduate skills engagement, a culture of progression and scholarship, and ultimately competitiveness in today’s workplace.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper have implications for colleges to distinguish themselves amongst post-secondary institutions as providers of specialized skills development in higher education, especially as competency-based education grows in importance. It also puts in to question how this type of engaging design can be further built in to post-secondary graduate curriculum.

Originality/value

This paper illuminates innovative practice at the post-graduate level, as an example of a skills-based scholarly activity. It helps position colleges as providers of effective, competency and outcomes-based higher education. This paper can add value to practitioners looking to build similar programming, by combining this Graduate Certificate design with evidence-based factors that build student engagement, particularly intrinsic motivation.

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Tom P. Abeles

This paper aims to look at the potential impact of personalized or competency-based learning on educational institutions at the structural level and in the knowledge…

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290

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at the potential impact of personalized or competency-based learning on educational institutions at the structural level and in the knowledge acquisition domain.

Design/methodology/approach

This article takes the structure of an editorial piece.

Findings

The essay suggests that the shift in pedagogy can impact on the operational and economic structure of the institution separate from the educational impact.

Originality/value

The potential impact of pedagogy shift could affect the economics of institutions as well as the entire operational structure and employment of the institution at the administrational level.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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