Search results

1 – 10 of over 21000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Geoffrey Injeni, Musa Mangena, David Mathuva and Robert Mudida

This paper aims to examine the factors influencing the level of disclosures of sustainability (SR) and integrated report (IR) information in a developing country context…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the factors influencing the level of disclosures of sustainability (SR) and integrated report (IR) information in a developing country context, with particular reference to Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a panel data set of 419 firm-year observations of listed companies in Kenya covering the period 2010 through 2018. Data are collected from the annual reports and analysed using a generalized estimations equation model.

Findings

The results reveal that there is momentum towards newer reporting frameworks in Kenya with substantial IR and SR disclosures in their annual reports. The results also show that level of SR and IR disclosures is influenced by both agency-related factors (board gender diversity, audit committee independence, block ownership and the presence of foreign ownership). Additionally, institutional-related factors (regulatory pressure and promotional efforts of regulatory and professional bodies [reporting excellence awards]) influence the disclosures.

Practical implications

The results highlight that initiatives such as those led by the regulatory and professional bodies in Kenya are effective in motivating companies to enhance disclosures. Thus, regulators and professional bodies might need to continue and even intensify their efforts. These results have implications for further research as they show that SR and IR disclosures are influenced by similar factors.

Social implications

The study has the potential to contribute to the ongoing initiatives and discussions on the adoption of IR by firms in Africa as spearheaded by the African Integrated Reporting Council.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, the study is, perhaps, the first to examine both SR and IR disclosures at the same study allowing comparison of the extent and drivers of the two disclosures. Moreover, examining the institutional-related factors in a single country has not been done in prior literature, and so this is an innovation.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Muhammad Azizul Islam, Shamima Haque, Sharon Henderson, Michael John Jones and Homaira Semeen

This study aims to investigate whether United Kingdom (UK)-based companies have changed their voluntary disclosures on curbing the bribery of foreign officials in response…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether United Kingdom (UK)-based companies have changed their voluntary disclosures on curbing the bribery of foreign officials in response to the UK Bribery Act 2010, and if so whether and how such disclosure changes substantively reflected allegations of bribery of foreign officials by news media.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the notions of institutional pressure and decoupling and applying content and thematic analysis, the authors examined, in particular, disclosures on curbing bribery by the largest 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange in periods before and after the Bribery Act (2007–2012). News media reports covering incidents of bribery of foreign officials and related corporate disclosures before and after the Act were thoroughly examined to problematise corporate anti-bribery disclosure practices.

Findings

The study finds a significant change in disclosure on curbing bribery before and after the enactment of the UK Bribery Act, consistent with the notion of institutional coercive pressure. However, decoupling is also found: organisations' disclosures did not substantively reflect incidents of bribing foreign public officials, mostly from underprivileged developing nations.

Research limitations/implications

This study acknowledges a limitation stemming from using media reports that focus on bribery incidents in identifying actual cases or incidents of bribery. As some of the incidents identified from news media reports appeared to be allegations, not convictions for bribery, companies could have defensible reasons for not disclosing some aspects of them.

Practical implications

Regulators should think why new or more regulations without substantive requirement are not helpful to curb corporate decoupling and injustice. The regulators should address the crisis that multinational companies (MNCs) being suppliers of bribery are much more harmful for the underprivileged communities in developing nations. Accordingly, this paper provides practical insights into how stakeholders ought to critically interpret MNCs' accounts of their involvement in bribery.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the accounting literature by problematising MNCs' operations in underprivileged countries. The findings suggest that not only public officials in developing countries as creators of bribery but also Western-based MNCs as the suppliers of bribery contribute to perpetuating unethical practices and injustices to the underprivileged communities in developing countries. This research is imperative as this is one of the first known studies that provides evidence of the actions including disclosure-related actions companies have taken in response to the UK Bribery Act.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Martin Freedman and Bikki Jaggi

This chapter evaluates whether disclosures on global warming by companies from the European Union are more extensive than disclosures by Japanese and Canadian firms. The…

Abstract

This chapter evaluates whether disclosures on global warming by companies from the European Union are more extensive than disclosures by Japanese and Canadian firms. The study is based on disclosures made on websites, annual reports, social, environmental and sustainability reports and on a questionnaire developed by the Carbon Disclosure Project by 282 of the largest firms from these countries. Content analysis is utilized to asses their disclosures. The results indicate that the EU firms make significantly less global warming disclosures than firms from Japan or Canada. We also find no relation between the changes in carbon emissions and global warming disclosures indicating that these disclosures do not truly reflect emission performance. These findings suggest that the EU requirements of reducing GHG pollution have not improved GHG disclosures. Regulatory disclosure requirements may be the answer to improve disclosures.

Details

Sustainability, Environmental Performance and Disclosures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-765-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Vanessa Magness

An environmental accident at a Placer Dome mine triggered a contagion effect across the Canadian mining industry. The decline in equity prices was moderated by prior…

Abstract

An environmental accident at a Placer Dome mine triggered a contagion effect across the Canadian mining industry. The decline in equity prices was moderated by prior disclosure of a high-level commitment to environmental management. Investors appear to interpret this information as a signal of expertise in the management of environmental risks and costs. The same companies are positioned to make the most credible financial disclosures about environmental management, and yet the evidence suggests that financial disclosures themselves have a negative impact on company value. There may be a miscommunication between investors and analysts on the one hand and mining company executives on the other, which could explain why mining company managers report their companies’ shares are undervalued.

Details

Sustainability, Environmental Performance and Disclosures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-765-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Desi Adhariani and Nick Sciulli

This study provides an analysis of the possibility of companies in Indonesia to adopt integrated reporting (IR). This is undertaken by comparing the degree of conformity…

Abstract

Purpose

This study provides an analysis of the possibility of companies in Indonesia to adopt integrated reporting (IR). This is undertaken by comparing the degree of conformity between current reporting disclosures with that of the IR framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach is employed, which entailed using both quantitative and qualitative techniques to access data. For the quantitative analysis, a total of 64 companies are chosen, which represent companies with significant market capitalization included in the LQ45 index (an index for the 45 most liquid stocks) in 2016 and the non-LQ45 by publishing a sustainability report. These companies are selected on the basis of high levels of disclosure compared with other companies and serve as an appropriate benchmark for other listed companies. The level of disclosure conformity is employed using 39 principle disclosure indices and 76 content disclosure indices based on the IR framework. For the qualitative analysis, interviews were conducted with nine interviewees that are considered as experts in the field of IR. The interviews are conducted to assist in providing explanations for the findings.

Findings

The results indicate that approximately 60% of companies (mostly in the banking, finance and mining industries) have an adequate degree of conformity, reflecting their higher probability of voluntary compliance to apply the IR framework. However, the principles of conciseness and connectivity of information provide significant challenges for Indonesian firms when they will consider implementation. Further analysis using in-depth interviews with experts showed that several factors from various perspectives should be considered in shifting to IR.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence on the current reporting landscape of Indonesian firms. Scant research is available on the possible adoption of IR in emerging markets such as Indonesia. Hence, this project raises further possible explanations for the challenges and pressures faced by Indonesian firms in an era of changing stakeholder expectations.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Mohamed A.K. Basuony, Ehab K.A. Mohamed, Ahmed Elragal and Khaled Hussainey

This study aims to investigate the extent and characteristics of corporate internet disclosure via companies’ websites as well via social media and networks sites in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the extent and characteristics of corporate internet disclosure via companies’ websites as well via social media and networks sites in the four leading English-speaking stock markets, namely, Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A disclosure index comprising a set of items that encompasses two facets of online disclosure, namely, company websites and social media sites, is used. This paper adopts a data science approach to investigate corporate internet disclosure practices among top listed firms in Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA.

Findings

The results reveal the underlying relations between the determining factors of corporate disclosure, i.e. profitability, leverage, liquidity and firm size. Profitability in its own has no great effect on the degree of corporate internet disclosure whether via company websites or social media sites. Liquidity has an impact on the degree of disclosure. Firm size and leverage appear to be the most important factors driving better disclosure via social media. American companies tend to be on the cutting edge of technology when it comes to corporate disclosure.

Practical implications

This paper provides new insights into corporate internet disclosure that will benefit all stakeholders with an interest in corporate reporting. Social media is an influential means of communication that can enable corporate office to get instant feedback enhancing their decision-making process.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is amongst few studies of corporate disclosure via social media platforms. This study has adopted disclosure index incorporating social media as well as applying data science approach in disclosure in an attempt to unfold how accounting could benefit from data science techniques.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Per Nikolaj Bukh, Christian Nielsen, Peter Gormsen and Jan Mouritsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether information on intellectual capital (non‐financial information on knowledge based resources) is disclosed in Danish IPO…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether information on intellectual capital (non‐financial information on knowledge based resources) is disclosed in Danish IPO prospectuses. Further, to analyse whether this voluntary disclosure has changed in the period from 1999 to 2001 and to analyse what factors can explain the amount of disclosure in the prospectuses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses content analysis to compile a measure of disclosure on each prospectus and statistical analysis to test whether there is an association between disclosure and company type, the existence of managerial ownership before the IPO, the size of the company or the age of the firm.

Findings

Based on statistical analysis, it is concluded that the extent of managerial ownership prior to the IPO and industry type affects the amount of voluntary intellectual capital disclosure, while company size and age do not affect disclosure. The results are interpreted in the light of the increasing importance of disclosing information on value drivers, strategy and intellectual capital to the capital market and constitute a contribution to the ongoing debate on corporate reporting practices.

Practical implications

Since information on intellectual capital is already disclosed in IPO prospectuses this reporting form can be used as inspiration when an intellectual capital report is developed. The results also indicate that companies and their advisers believe that this type of information is important in the capital market's assessment of the company's value. Further, it is suggested that intellectual capital reports should be read in the context of the firm's strategy in the same manner as an prospectus is read.

Originality/value

Very few papers have analysed disclosure in prospectuses and it has been from a different perspective from this paper. Further, this paper analyses a time series of data and demonstrates how the amount of disclosure has developed over the years. Finally, the paper contributes to the body of literature on what factors explain disclosure in general.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Mahmood Ahmed Momin, Deryl Northcott and Mohammed Hossain

This paper aims to investigate the greenhouse gas (GHG)-related disclosure trends, content and strategies of the eight most high GHG-emitting Chinese power companies, over…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the greenhouse gas (GHG)-related disclosure trends, content and strategies of the eight most high GHG-emitting Chinese power companies, over a period when government pressure to manage GHG emissions increased.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the 2000-2009 annual reports, corporate social and environmental responsibility reports and websites of eight Chinese power companies. Content analysis results were supplemented with excerpts from documents written in English or Chinese. Legitimacy theory informed the interpretation of the findings.

Findings

GHG-related disclosures increased from 2002 when the Chinese Government ratified the Kyoto Protocol and promulgated stringent environmental regulations. However, some expected types of GHG-related disclosure were absent or rare. Disclosure practices were found to be underpinned by reputation management objectives and reflected a symbolic rather than substantive legitimation strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the literature on GHG-related disclosures by carbon-intensive firms and points to the need for future research to examine such disclosures in different countries to appreciate the variety in practice.

Practical implications

While the Chinese Government appears to have driven the emergence of GHG-related disclosure practices, companies can effect improvement by expanding the scope and content of what they disclose. Also, the growing emphasis on website disclosures may present challenges in ensuring the reliability and assurance of GHG disclosures.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine GHG-related disclosure practices by Chinese power-generating companies, a sector crucial to managing the GHG effects of China’s significant economic growth.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Kamal Naser, Khalid Al‐Khatib and Yusuf Karbhari

Over the last decade, Jordanian Authorities and Government adopted several far‐reaching measures aimed at improving its investment environment. These measures included the…

Abstract

Over the last decade, Jordanian Authorities and Government adopted several far‐reaching measures aimed at improving its investment environment. These measures included the introduction of International Accounting Standards (IASs) in 1990, amendment of the Companies Act in 1997 and amendments to Investment Promotion Law in 1998. This study specifically provides empirical evidence on changes in the depth of corporate disclosure after introducing IASs. In addition, the relationship between the depth of corporate disclosure and company's attributes is investigated. The outcome of the analysis reveals a slight improvement in the depth of disclosure after the introduction the IASs. The depth of disclosure seems to be associated with corporate size, audit firm status, liquidity, gearing, and profitability.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Yolanda Fuertes-Callén, Beatriz Cuellar-Fernández and Marcela Pelayo-Velázquez

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of online corporate reporting in three Latin American emerging markets, Argentina, Mexico and Chile, providing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of online corporate reporting in three Latin American emerging markets, Argentina, Mexico and Chile, providing further evidence to test the mediation role of web presence development in the relationship between these determinants and e-disclosure. Web presence development measures the firm's efforts to archive web visibility, web usability and convenience.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a content analysis of corporate web sites, the extent of the information is measured by three internet disclosure indexes. Four constructs which are considered key drivers of a firm's disclosure strategy are identified. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to assess the research model. The sample contains publicly available data on listed companies’ web sites.

Findings

The results reveal that the development of a firm's presence on the internet is as important as its characteristics in determining corporate transparency and in mediating the relationship between firm size and cross-listing and e-disclosure.

Practical implications

Companies should be aware that investors are attaching increasing importance to corporate transparency. Consequently, managers should put more effort into improving web sites, which would increase corporate visibility and open up a direct communication channel with their stakeholders. They should also take advantage of web sites to provide information, above and beyond that required by local law. Not only do current and potential investors find this useful, it also increases their confidence in the company.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an integrative model of the determinants of the level of online corporate reporting using constructs that reflect their multidimensional nature. A non-financial latent variable for web presence on the internet is proposed as a mediator in the relationship between e-disclosure and traditional determinants. The SEM approach simultaneously examines the direct and indirect relationships between the proposed latent variables and how these relationships influence the level of e-disclosure.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 21000