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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Pimporn Phukrongpet, Hanvedes Daovisan and Panarat Satsanasupint

The purpose of this study is to explore the drivers of innovative behaviour of sustainable community-based enterprises (SCBEs) in the Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the drivers of innovative behaviour of sustainable community-based enterprises (SCBEs) in the Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on insights from a qualitative case study method, this paper uses a purposive sampling technique with 30 SCBEs from December 2019 to December 2020. This study uses in-depth interviews and applied content analysis (e.g. theme, categorisation, quotation and coding), using the ATLAS.ti software.

Findings

This case study shows that transforming the community into an enterprise is related to creation, venture and innovative management, sustained in community-based enterprises. The findings reveal that innovative behaviour is associated with intention, thinking, orientation, product development, service, collaboration, competition and technology, which drives SCBEs.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of community-based group and cooperative community-based enterprise with innovative behaviour, which can drive SCBEs growth.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2012

Carol J. De Vita and Erwin de Leon

Purpose – To examine the role of Latino community-based nonprofits in integrating first- and second-generation Latino immigrants into mainstream society.

Abstract

Purpose – To examine the role of Latino community-based nonprofits in integrating first- and second-generation Latino immigrants into mainstream society.

Methodology/approach – This place-based study uses a mixed methods approach to analyze financial and administrative data from the National Center for Charitable Statistics and semi-structured interviews with organizational leaders.

Findings – Latino community-based nonprofits provide a wide range of programs and services to their constituents that promote the social and political mobility of Latino immigrants and their families. Findings also suggest a potential spatial mismatch between Latino-serving nonprofits and the people they serve. The organizations are concentrated in the Washington, DC metropolitan area while the Latino community is branching out into the outer suburbs of Maryland and Virginia. Moreover, different political and administrative structures and policies affect the ability of these nonprofits to serve their constituents.

Research limitations/implications – The study's geographic boundaries may limit the generalizability of spatial mismatch between Latino-serving nonprofits and their constituents. However, the findings about programs and services and the impact of political and administrative structures and policies can be applied to other immigrant-serving organizations.

Practical implications – Policy makers, elected officials, and other stakeholders can learn the importance of Latino and immigrant community-based nonprofits. These organizations act as bridges to the Latino and other immigrant communities.

Social implications – Latino and other immigrant community-based nonprofits are integral to the integration of immigrant communities as active and contributing members of wider society.

Originality/value of paper – This study looks at immigrant integration through the lens of community-based nonprofits.

Details

Hispanic Migration and Urban Development: Studies from Washington DC
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-345-3

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Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2012

Yuki Matsuoka, Jonas Joerin, Rajib Shaw and Yukiko Takeuchi

The importance of community-based organizations to support relief works in the aftermath of disasters is widely recognized as indispensable in providing quickly the needed…

Abstract

The importance of community-based organizations to support relief works in the aftermath of disasters is widely recognized as indispensable in providing quickly the needed help for affected populations (Bajek, Matsuda, & Okada, 2008; Nagasaka, 2008; Norris, Stevens, Pfefferbaum, Wyche, & Pfefferbaum, 2008; Shaw & Goda, 2004; Suzuki, 2006). Although communities’ involvement in rescue operations is essential, their role in rehabilitation and future disaster preparedness activities is equally important in the process of forming a disaster-resilient society (Nagasaka, 2008). Furthermore, the level of interaction between local authorities and communities within different phases (preparedness, relief, and rehabilitation) of the disaster management cycle requires attention to effectively implement community-based disaster risk reduction (CBDRR).

Details

Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-868-8

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Nuttamon Teerakul, Renato A. Villano, Fiona Q. Wood and Stuart W. Mounter

The purpose of this paper is to describe a framework developed for assessing Community‐based Enterprises' (CBEs') impacts on poverty reduction at the household level in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a framework developed for assessing Community‐based Enterprises' (CBEs') impacts on poverty reduction at the household level in northern Thailand, in the context of the UN Millennium Development Goals. The focus is on the use of principal component analysis to develop a context‐specific definition of poverty.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains how business performance measurement, impact assessment of development projects and poverty measurement have been integrated into a single poverty impact assessment framework in relation to CBEs. This framework has two key steps: identification of poverty groups and poverty components; and impact assessment of CBEs and other factors on household poverty.

Findings

The framework captures a number of qualitative and quantitative aspects of poverty necessary for an accurate relative measure for differing geographical, economic and cultural contexts.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper's approach lies in the design of the framework used to assess poverty impacts of CBEs at the household level. The framework combines three well‐known, but traditionally separately used, methodologies in order to better explore the economic dynamic of CBEs on households. The paper is expected to be of high relevance, both theoretically and methodologically, to researchers undertaking similar poverty, micro‐enterprise and social entrepreneurship studies in other developing countries.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2010

Murugesh Arunachalam and Stewart Lawrence

The paper aims to draw on recommendations of Agenda 21 and communitarian theory to examine collaboration between local district community and local authorities to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to draw on recommendations of Agenda 21 and communitarian theory to examine collaboration between local district community and local authorities to formulate strategies for the sustainable development of the Taupo district.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts an interpretative methodology based on philosophical hermeneutic to understand collaboration between local community and local authorities in the Taupo district. Empirical data for this interpretive study comprise public documents, interview transcripts and minutes of meetings attended by the researchers. The paper begins interpretation of empirical data with pre‐understanding of communitarian theory and Agenda 21.

Findings

The findings indicate that historical and political factors and diversity of interests in the community affect processes and outcomes of collaboration. Local authorities play a crucial role in bringing together various groups in the Taupo community which are segregated by diversity of interests, especially between Maori and non‐Maori community groups. Without local authority facilitation, the Taupo community may remain segregated; inhibited by lack of information; and not having the opportunity to participate in sustainable development. Community participation in the Taupo district is at an infancy stage and collaboration intended to empower communities may result in local authorities recentralising their positions.

Originality/value

The paper integrates theory and practice and provides valuable insights for statutory agencies seeking to implement the recommendations of Agenda 21 regarding community participation in sustainable development.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

John Rose, David Rose, Cliff Hawkins and Caitlin Anderson

This paper aims to provide a rationale for the development of a community‐based group for men with intellectual disability who have been involved in sexually inappropriate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a rationale for the development of a community‐based group for men with intellectual disability who have been involved in sexually inappropriate behaviour but may not have been charged.

Design/methodology/approach

The group was based on a cognitive behavioural model: group process and adaptations are briefly described. The group has been run on two occasions and preliminary data on outcome are provided.

Findings

Participants show a reduction in attitudes consistent with offending, an increase in sexual knowledge, and a more external locus of control on completion of the group. One of the 12 men who attended was recorded as offending again within 18 months of group completion; however, three moved to less well supervised placements.

Originality/value

It is concluded that this style of treatment has some advantages over other models and may be more effective, yet further research is required.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Charlotte Ryan and Gregory Squires

We argue that by conducting systematic research with communities rather than on communities, community-based research (CBR) methods can both advance the study of human…

Abstract

We argue that by conducting systematic research with communities rather than on communities, community-based research (CBR) methods can both advance the study of human interaction and strengthen public understanding and appreciation of social sciences. CBR, among other methods, can also address social scientists’ ethical and social commitments. We recap the history of calls by leading sociologists for rigorous, empirical, community-engaged research. We introduce CBR methods as empirically grounded methods for conducting social research with social actors. We define terms and describe the range of methods that we include in the umbrella term, “community-based research.” After providing exemplars of community-based research, we review CBR’s advantages and challenges. We, next, summarize an intervention that we undertook as members of the Publication Committee of the URBAN Research Network’s Sociology section in which the committee developed and disseminated guidelines for peer review of community-based research. We also share initial responses from journal editors. In the conclusion, we revisit the potential of community-based research and note the consequences of neglecting community-based research traditions.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2018

Jaelan Sumo Sulat, Yayi Suryo Prabandari, Rossi Sanusi, Elsi Dwi Hapsari and Budiono Santoso

Community-based HIV testing and counselling (HTC) has been recommended for improving access to prevention, care, and treatment services in at-risk populations. Earlier…

Abstract

Purpose

Community-based HIV testing and counselling (HTC) has been recommended for improving access to prevention, care, and treatment services in at-risk populations. Earlier systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been undertaken, but due to some methodological limitations, their findings do not yet provide a practical significance. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the recent evidence of the efficacy of community-based HTC approaches on the uptake of HTC in at-risk populations.

Design/methodology/approach

The database of PubMed online, Science Direct, the Lancet Global Health, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar were systematically searched using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to obtain empirical papers published between March 2013 and December 2015.

Findings

Of 600 collected papers, there were 6 cluster randomized trials papers which met the inclusion criteria. Compared to the health facilities-based HTC, community-based HTC approaches have been shown to improve the uptake of HIV testing from 5.8 to 37 per cent, and improve HIV testing in men and their partners together from 6.8 to 34 per cent. The community approaches also detected lower HIV-positive cases (0.29 per cent as compared to 4 per cent), improved access to treatment services from 0.3 to 25 per cent, demonstrated higher cluster differentiation 4 count in newly diagnosed patients (median of 400-438 cells/µl), and increased the rate of first-time HIV testing from 9 to 11.8 per cent. With respect to social and behavioural outcomes, community-based HTC increased social norms for HIV testing by 6 per cent (95 per cent CI 3-9), decreased multiple sex partners by 55 per cent (95 per cent CI 42-73), lowered casual sex by 45 per cent (95 per cent CI 33-62), increased knowledge about HIV (83.2 vs 28.9 per cent), improved positive attitudes towards HIV patients (73.0 vs 34.3 per cent), and increased the use of condoms (28.0 vs 12.3 per cent).

Originality/value

Community-based HTC combined with behavioural interventions have been found to be more effective in increasing the uptake of HIV testing as well as other outcomes as compared to the conventional health facilities-based testing and counselling approaches.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Jenny Barber, Sarah E Hillier, Geoff Middleton, Richard Keegan, Hannah Henderson and Jacquie Lavin

– The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility and benefits of providing weight management support via the workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility and benefits of providing weight management support via the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Quasi-experimental design using non-random assignment to a 12-week Slimming World (SW) weight management programme, either within the workplace or at a regular community group. Weight was recorded weekly and a 39-item questionnaire focused on mental and emotional health, self-esteem, dietary habits and physical activity habits administered at baseline, 12 weeks, six and 12 months.

Findings

In total, 243 participants enroled (workplace n=129, community n=114) with 138 completers (defined as those weighing-in at baseline and attending at least once within the last four weeks; workplace n=76, community n=62). Completers reported a mean weight change of −4.9 kg±3.4 or −5.7 per cent±3.8. Mental and emotional health scores increased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks. Self-worth scores increased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks, six and 12 months. Healthy dietary habit scores increased and unhealthy dietary habit scores decreased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks, six and 12 months. Healthy physical activity habit scores improved (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks and six months. There were no significant differences between groups.

Research limitations/implications

Participant demographic was predominantly female (94 per cent) aged 42.3 years, with only 13 men participating.

Practical implications

The results support the use of a 12-week SW weight management programme as a credible option for employers wanting to support staff to achieve weight loss and improve psycho-social health outcomes which could lead to improvements in quality of life and work performance.

Originality/value

Provides evidence for the delivery of weight management support via the workplace.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

I. Oluranti Ogunrinola

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role that social capital plays in the determination and distribution of business earnings of female entrepreneurs in selected…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role that social capital plays in the determination and distribution of business earnings of female entrepreneurs in selected rural communities of Ogun State, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical foundation of social capital and its relationship to informal finance was used in a modified Mincer's model to examine the distribution of earnings among a sample of members of informal self‐help groups. The study relied on a set of secondary data collected from a survey of 275 female micro‐entrepreneurs in five rural communities in Ogun State, Nigeria. The analysis of data was done with the use of SPSS computer software while the ordinary least squares regression technique was used in the models' estimation.

Findings

The findings show that though human capital variables contribute to earnings in the usual Mincer's parlance, social capital as well as neighbourhood effect variables appear much more important determinants.

Originality/value

The study quantified and applied five social capital variables in the estimated earnings function and three of these variables were found to be statistically significant in their effects on earnings distribution among the study sample. The study concluded by advocating a multi‐disciplinary approach to the study of enterprise development as well as a coordinated approach by the government to promote self‐help organisations among women in the rural areas.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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