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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Young‐joo Lee and Jeffrey L. Brudney

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the perceived benefits and costs of volunteering affect participation. Based on this rational choice approach, the research…

4253

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the perceived benefits and costs of volunteering affect participation. Based on this rational choice approach, the research tests a multivariate model of the determinants of volunteering.

Design/methodology/approach

The database for the empirical analysis is the 2005 Americans' Time Use Survey. To estimate the model of participation in volunteer activity, this research uses the complementary log‐log technique.

Findings

The findings support the central hypothesis that participation in volunteering decreases as the opportunity cost of volunteer activity increases. In addition, participation in volunteering increases as people perceive themselves as more embedded in their communities, thus suggesting that rational individuals make strategic assessments in their decisions to volunteer based on the level of trust in the exchange relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that policies that promote a sense of embeddedness in the community, as well as those that link the workplace and volunteer opportunities, would help motivate rational individuals to volunteer. In‐depth interviews to ascertain people's motivations to volunteer would be useful to supplement the findings.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that policies that promote a sense of embeddedness in the community, as well as those that link the workplace and volunteer opportunities, would help motivate rational individuals to volunteer.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of volunteer behavior as a rational choice in an exchange relationship. Based on these findings, this research argues that policies that promote a sense of community embeddedness as well as those that link the workplace and volunteer opportunities, help motivate rational individuals to volunteer.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 29 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jane Macnaughton, Mike White and Rosie Stacy

This review article seeks to draw on experience in the UK to describe the different forms that arts in health activity can take and to examine the challenges for research…

4878

Abstract

Purpose

This review article seeks to draw on experience in the UK to describe the different forms that arts in health activity can take and to examine the challenges for research in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is used to describe the kind of arts in health project that intends to enhance the social capital of its community and to show how difficult it is to measure the effects of this work using conventional measures of health improvement. However, those who are responsible for providing funding for arts in health are increasingly demanding results that indicate a measurable health gain from the projects.

Findings

A literature review of the evaluation of arts in health projects in the UK has shown that few aim at direct health improvement but rather at intermediate indicators of health gain, such as raising awareness of health issues and social activity and participation. This suggests that artists instinctively locate their work as having value within a social model of health where improvements in social inclusion and social cohesion are the important indicators which may go on to lead to long‐term improvements to the health of the community in which they are working.

Originality/value

Understanding the nature of this work has implications for the kind of research appropriate to measure its effect and the timescale required for such research.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Mark Dooris

This paper aims to describe the context, process and findings of a qualitative review of Walsall Arts into Health Partnership, which is widely acknowledged to be one of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the context, process and findings of a qualitative review of Walsall Arts into Health Partnership, which is widely acknowledged to be one of the most progressive community‐based arts and health programmes in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a multi‐method qualitative approach to gathering data, using a combination of documentary analysis and semi‐structured interviews and focus groups with a range of stakeholders.

Findings

The findings highlight a number of emerging themes categorised under four broad headings: impact of the Arts into Health work on health and wellbeing of the people of Walsall; effectiveness; key characteristics; and future development of the Arts into Health Partnership.

Research implications

The research findings point to the value of community arts and health work and to the importance of a partnership approach. However, current debates regarding evaluation approaches within the field point to the need for clarification regarding values, the use of multiple methodologies and engagement with a diversity of stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of the local and national arts and health policy contexts within which the review took place – shortly before a major restructuring of the health service; outlines the research methodology; presents and discusses the key findings, outlines recommendations; and discusses subsequent action and the impact of the research.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Martin Kemp

This paper aims to explore the role of drama and theatre in promoting the emotional and social wellbeing of a group of young Black men living in south London.

1118

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of drama and theatre in promoting the emotional and social wellbeing of a group of young Black men living in south London.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was used in a process and outcome evaluation of a drama‐based initiative that aimed to promote young Black men's sexual and emotional health.

Findings

The research found that this community‐based initiative was able to promote young people's self‐esteem and a positive sense of agency. This was achieved by creating opportunities for self‐expression, reflection and self‐understanding, and through the development of relationships between participants characterised by trust and reciprocity.

Originality/value

The evaluation points to the strengths of youth and community work and arts‐based approaches in engaging young people around health issues and in promoting emotional wellbeing and a positive sense of identity among young people. The evaluation also highlights the usefulness of process‐oriented qualitative evaluation as an appropriate way of evaluating and contributing to the ongoing development of initiatives that aim to use the arts in healthcare settings.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Elaine Argyle and Gillie Bolton

Drawing on literature and the evaluation of a UK community Arts in Health project, this article aims first to demonstrate that, in spite of the common association in…

4230

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on literature and the evaluation of a UK community Arts in Health project, this article aims first to demonstrate that, in spite of the common association in mental health practice between art and the use of psychotherapeutic techniques, involvement in art creation can, in itself, have a sustained and positive impact on the mental and social wellbeing of participants and, second, to give an analysis of the different forms of arts involvement in health.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative evaluation of a successful process‐based arts in health‐care provision to existing vulnerable mental health community groups is discussed.

Findings

While the implementation of traditional forms of art therapy tends to be the preserve of those with specialist training, process‐orientated art for health projects have been found to be more versatile and are developments in which many practitioners potentially play an important part. Arts in Health provision in a community setting can offer positive health benefits, and aid health promotion.

Practical implications

More widespread, sustained funding and further evaluation and research for this accessible, cost‐effective means of health promotion in a community setting are needed.

Originality/value

Arts in Health, in institutions (such as prison and hospital) as well as community, is a rapidly expanding, successful and attractive, yet severely under‐funded provision. Descriptive in‐depth evaluations and critical analyses of the field, such as that presented here, need to be made available in order to develop the field practically and theoretically.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Rabindra Osti

Water‐induced hazards and disasters are usually compounded by the mismanagement of local water resources. Since the community bears the burden of disaster and is the first…

2222

Abstract

Water‐induced hazards and disasters are usually compounded by the mismanagement of local water resources. Since the community bears the burden of disaster and is the first responder to the event, it is imperative to build the capacity of the community to enhance their coping mechanism and resilience to prepare for and face the disaster. The best strategy for the immediate as well as the long term cost‐benefit and pro‐environmental implications that will ensure prevention, mitigation and rehabilitation of water‐induced disaster is to ensure strong community participation. This paper elucidates the different forms of community participation and their comparative advantages in a socio‐economic dimension, thereby poverty alleviation. Agencies’ roles are analyzed in response to community participation. It is hoped that these theoretical and practical tips will benefit both community and agencies to work out better performances in advance.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Andrew Reese

Focuses on how WSP Environmental is using real‐world community projects to combat the challenges of knowledge sharing, and to develop improved virtual teamwork

743

Abstract

Purpose

Focuses on how WSP Environmental is using real‐world community projects to combat the challenges of knowledge sharing, and to develop improved virtual teamwork, cross‐cultural communication and ambassadorial leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes how a team of ten nationalities from eight offices was charged with providing a shelter to facilitate the work of a local non‐governmental organization in caring for HIV orphans in a rural community in Limpopo province, South Africa, where 50 percent of people are unemployed and around 30 percent live below poverty level, and where everyone is either affected or infected by HIV.

Findings

Demonstrates that team members were successfully united by this common and worthwhile achievement. One key aspect for their continued success was agreeing a charter for ways of working virtually, and ensuring that this charter was maintained.

Practical implications

Shows how WSP used the project to benefit a community and to address key business challenges.

Originality/value

Records that staff turnover has remained at zero up to 18 months after the completion of the community project.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Barbara F.H. Allen

Service learning has become an important teaching methodology in many American schools, colleges, and universities. Libraries will thus want to add resources to their…

1355

Abstract

Purpose

Service learning has become an important teaching methodology in many American schools, colleges, and universities. Libraries will thus want to add resources to their collections in this subject area to support faculty and student research. This article aims to briefly define the concept of service learning and to describe selected resources in the area.

Design/methodology/approach

The annotated bibliography is divided into three sections: organizations and their web sites, Periodicals, and Books.

Findings

Service learning, once an experimental teaching and learning approach, has become well established as a pedagogy. In designing a successful service learning experience, teachers and faculty must identify real community needs, must structure the experience in such a way that students can grow and learn from it and, on completion of the experience, must assess its outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper synthesizes the literature on service learning and provides a guide for librarians who want to add materials in this area to their collection.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Kieran James, Chris Tolliday and Rex Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to review the cancellation of Australia's National Soccer League (NSL) competition and its replacement in 2004 with the corporatist A‐League…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the cancellation of Australia's National Soccer League (NSL) competition and its replacement in 2004 with the corporatist A‐League which is based on the North American model of “one team one city”, no promotion and relegation, and private‐equity clubs. The authors believe that one of the aims of the A‐League and its “ground‐zero” ideology was to institute exclusion of the ethnic clubs that had formed the backbone of the NSL for 30 years.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive literature search, participant‐observation, one personal interview and two group interviews were employed. People interviewed were the President of the Croatian community's Melbourne Knights Football Club, the Club Secretary of Melbourne Knights, and three leaders of Melbourne Knights’ MCF hooligan firm.

Findings

The authors observe the Football Federation Australia hiding behind the perceived scientific nature and technical veracity of budgeted accounting numbers to set the financial bar too high for the ethnic clubs to find a place in the brave new world that has been called “Modern Football”. However, capitalism creates its own discontents. Online forums and homemade fence banners are the new vehicles for dissent for the supporters of “Old Soccer”.

Originality/value

There is still only a small academic literature on Australian football and most of this has been written by humanities lecturers. The paper offers a business school perspective.

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Natasha Newbery, Jim McCambridge and John Strang

The feasibility of a community‐level drug prevention intervention based upon the principles of motivational interviewing within a further education college was…

1107

Abstract

Purpose

The feasibility of a community‐level drug prevention intervention based upon the principles of motivational interviewing within a further education college was investigated in a pilot study.

Design/methodology/approach

The implementation over the course of a single term of “Let's Talk about Drugs” was studied with both action research methods and a quasi‐experimental design.

Findings

Modest qualitative evidence of attitudinal and environmental benefit provides some optimism that intervention of greater duration may have the capacity to produce more substantial impact.

Research limitations/implications

The sustainability of the achieved institutional changes following the delivery of this intervention, most notably centring upon a revised drug policy, is questionable. No quantitative data on reduced drug use behaviour or associated problems directly attributable to intervention was obtained.

Originality/value

Further education colleges offer relatively unexplored opportunities for drug prevention and harm reduction, at both individual and community levels. Three major lessons were learned: for the motivational interviewing approach to be applied with meaningful potential to effectively shaping behaviour at the college level, greater input is required; quasi‐experimental methods for evaluation are feasible and appropriate; and intervention must be coherent with, and shaped by, the specific college context.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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