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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Arvind Upadhyay and Amporn Sa-ngiamwibool

This study aims to characterize the main research areas of published works, identify the disciplines that associated with the works and propose research agendas for future…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to characterize the main research areas of published works, identify the disciplines that associated with the works and propose research agendas for future inquiries, based on a systematic literature review that encompasses 89 research papers from 2010 to 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

This review commenced with the definition of the three research questions, and subsequently three steps were followed: (1) defining criteria for research paper selection; (2) specifying the data bases and selecting the papers based on the criteria and (3) data analysis, conclusion and discussion of selected papers. The search was limited to the selection of research papers in English, focusing on “community disaster resilience” which is the subject of this review and referred to as keywords which were used for the online search for papers. All these three words must be present in the title of the selected papers.

Findings

The area “resilience management” and “disaster resilience assessment” accounted for 43% of the studies, and it indicates that research has emphasized the description of how community disaster resilience has been managed and assessed. Three disciplines relating to disaster resilience are disaster risk science, public health and environment, and it indicates that research has fostered core areas of community disaster resilience. Three key research agenda include a growing trend to describe successful efforts to avert a potentially catastrophic disaster through solution-based case studies; a paradigmatic shift and implementation of how communities could help the disaster victims recuperate from disasters.

Research limitations/implications

This review is limited to the numbers of chosen papers, as only full papers were chosen. However, in order to establish more rigorous and inclusive results of the study, the numbers of citations of published papers to be chosen for future inquiry should be taken into account.

Originality/value

This present review originally investigated how the concept of disaster resilience has been applied at the community level and in related areas. As resilience is a multidisciplinary concept that has been investigated by several different disciplines, such as sustainability, psychology, economy and sociology, this study looked into how disciplines related to community disaster resilience to provide agenda for future inquiries. This study therefore characterized the main research areas of published works, identified the disciplines that associated with the works and proposed a research agenda for future inquiries.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

M.K. Gayadini Imesha Dharmasena, Margalit Toledano and C. Kay Weaver

The paper identifies a role for public relations in disaster management by analysing disaster and communication managers' understanding of community resilience and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper identifies a role for public relations in disaster management by analysing disaster and communication managers' understanding of community resilience and their use of communication in the context of two different cultural environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study comprised 51 in-depth qualitative interviews with disaster managers in Sri Lanka and New Zealand, which were thematically analysed using the software programme NVivo 10.

Findings

The study identified cultural differences in Sri Lanka and New Zealand that impact on how managers' communicate in natural disaster situations. The findings indicated that public relations’ understanding of communities’ cultures, their communication, networking and lobbying skills could further enhance the effectiveness of efforts to build community resilience to disasters.

Research limitations/implications

Nations are complex multicultural realities; the findings cannot be generalized to make claims about how natural disasters are managed in different national contexts.

Practical implications

The paper identifies the unrealized potential of public relations’ expertise in communication, community relations, networking and lobbying to contribute to building community resilience to natural disasters.

Social implications

By supporting efforts to build community resilience to disasters, public relations practitioners can contribute to social well-being in times of catastrophic natural disasters.

Originality/value

The paper adds an innovative perspective to public relations crisis literature by identifying the potential contribution of public relations’ concepts and practices to build community resilience to natural disasters. It demonstrates how sociocultural differences may affect disaster communication strategies.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Paul Arbon, Malinda Steenkamp, Victoria Cornell, Lynette Cusack and Kristine Gebbie

This paper aims to discuss the development of two toolkits that were designed to help communities and households measure their level of disaster resilience and provide…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the development of two toolkits that were designed to help communities and households measure their level of disaster resilience and provide practical tools to help them increase and maintain these levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The toolkits were developed across two studies, with the community toolkit development being undertaken first. A literature review was conducted to develop a definition and model of community disaster resilience; and a Scorecard was designed to assess levels of existing community disaster resilience. The definition and Scorecard were reviewed and refined with the help of two communities before a final version was trialled in four communities across Australia. The household toolkit project followed a similar approach, with trialling being undertaken in conjunction with two non-government organisations that carry out outreach work in the community.

Findings

The development and trial of the Scorecards was extremely valuable. The conclusion voiced by communities and reached by the study project teams was that the user-friendly Scorecard is a workable tool for people to assess their household and community disaster resilience and to come together to plan what might further strengthen resilience. Critical to the Scorecards’ success was an understanding of the purpose of the assessment tool and the meaning of resilience.

Originality/value

The toolkits take an all-hazards approach and help community members, individuals and local policymakers to set priorities, allocate funds and develop emergency and disaster management programmes that build local community resilience.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2018

Alessandra Ricciardelli, Francesco Manfredi and Margaret Antonicelli

The aim of this paper is to understand how resilience builds to achieve a management model for sustainable resilience, as advocated by sustainable development goals…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand how resilience builds to achieve a management model for sustainable resilience, as advocated by sustainable development goals (SDGs), in distressed communities. The topic is addressed with the case of Macerata, an Italian city located at the epicentre of the devastating earthquake in 1997 and later, in a short time interval between August 2016 and January 2017. Necessary knowledge on modes and places of engagement and collaboration is delivered in the attempt to demonstrate that social and cultural factors have stronger impacts on devastated communities as they contribute to resilience for future incidents.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a quantitative econometric approach. It unfolds in two steps. The first uses the estimation method through factor analysis of an index of resilience, a latent variable, and reveals that it comes from social, cultural, political and economic latent factors. The second uses a reduced equation model that elaborates and integrates two models: the one estimating the relationship between the level of development and the impacts due to natural disasters and the other containing the index of resilience, but only its most relevant ones. A rotated component matrix, which is the elaboration of the model, will be created.

Findings

Although measuring resilience, in practice, is hampered by both conceptual and methodological challenges, including finding reliable and meaningful data, the attempt to measure resilience in this research has helped in testifying two important research hypotheses. According to H1, resilience is a fundamental variable to ensure faster economic recovery and has a negative impact on the dependent variable (deaths); hence, it is considered statistically significant. According to H2, social resilience develops and increases at the event’s recurrence and leverages on the adaptive, self-organising community capacities in recovering from traumatic circumstances and episodes of distress.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this paper is that the comparison between the two earthquakes is biased by the interviewees’ misleading responses on the provided questionnaires due to lack of memory about the 1997 shock and a more higher perception of the latest quakes that occurred recently in 2016 and 2017. There is a strong awareness of the fact that future research will improve the analysis suggested in this paper by attempting a quantification of the perception about the difference between the two occurred earthquakes by replacing the dummy variable (β6 improvement) with a cluster analysis.

Practical implications

The paper fills the gap in the empirical literature on risk management and organisational resilience. This research represents a guide to support and accelerate building resilience by people engagement and empowerment, enthusiasm and commitment in a way that conventional politics is failing to do. In particular, it aims to support public organisations and policymakers at the front by providing them with reliable information on the factors and concerns that need to be considered to increase community’s level of resilience, coherently with their endogenous characteristics, to ensure a steady, stable and sustainable recovery from the crisis.

Social implications

This research teaches that resilience depends on the existence of minimum preconditions for building resilience – political and economic opportunities, as well as cultural and social factors – as the measurement of tangible factors such as assets and financial capital may not capture everything that influences resilience. However, although it is common sense that disaster recovery processes are significantly hard to bear, it is important to acknowledge that they can offer a series of unique and valuable opportunities to improve on the status quo. Capitalizing on these opportunities means to well-equip communities to advance long-term health, resilience and sustainability and prepare them for future challenges.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the discussion over the development of sustainable cities and communities by providing a resilience measurement framework in terms of indicators and dimensions of resilience. It emphasises on the endogenous adaptation capacity of territories partially analysed in the empirical literature with regard to resilience. The originality relates to the suggested model being a tool for social and territorial analysis, useful for ensuring a summary and comprehensive assessment of socioeconomic resilience; comparing different timelines (the first earthquake occurred in 1997 and the other two, occurring in a short time interval from one another, in August 2016 and January 2017).

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Shihui Feng, Liaquat Hossain and Douglas Paton

Disaster education is considered as a newly emerging area of research and practice, which promotes community-based educational approaches for building resilience. Given…

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster education is considered as a newly emerging area of research and practice, which promotes community-based educational approaches for building resilience. Given the atypical nature of these disturbances, people and communities need to develop the knowledge required to anticipate and understand what they could have to contend with and proactively develop strategies that can minimize their risk and afford ways to cope with and adapt to adverse situations in an effective manner. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that informal education resulting from daily activities related to work, family life, or leisure can be harnessed to develop disaster resilience within community settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper provides the discussion and synthesis of literature covering community resilience, disaster risk reduction (DRR) and informal education. In doing so, this study proposes a conceptual framework and implementation strategies for harnessing informal education in building community resilience.

Findings

To harness informal disaster education for community resilience, the authors suggest a conceptual framework and four implementation strategies with the corresponding implications: cultivate social environment for conversations, discussions, reflections and learning; design social activities for promoting and encouraging informal learning; appropriate interventions by informal educators in social activities; and transparent resources and channels for information and social supports. A compilation of a number of community-based DRR practices involving civil society organizations has been incorporated in the proposed framework for exemplifying informal disaster education for community resilience.

Originality/value

Promoting informal education in community settings is aimed at building community resilience in a collective way, which is especially important in disaster-prone areas. Informal education for community resilience not only educates individuals how to deal with disasters, but also connects individuals together to be more resilient in their ability to cope or bounce back from adverse events in their life.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

K. Sankaran and Catherine Demangeot

This paper aims to demonstrate the potential of virtual communities in enabling community-based entrepreneurship and resilience. Resilience is an important attribute for a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the potential of virtual communities in enabling community-based entrepreneurship and resilience. Resilience is an important attribute for a community to overcome adverse circumstances it may face.

Design/methodology/approach

Weaving together diverse strands of scholarship, the authors show how virtual communities centered around specific interests (Obst et al., 2002) can endow geographic communities with resilience.

Findings

The paper establishes the desirability of resilience in contemporary communities, which can be enhanced through internet-mediated entrepreneurship. Five specific phenomena are identified as facilitating the emergence of community-based entrepreneurship through membership in virtual communities. Community-based entrepreneurship can augment or even replace institutional support that has until recently been considered by policy makers as the only means of addressing resilience issues, especially in disadvantaged communities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is conceptual in nature; the conceptualization provides a rich opportunity to empirically validate the argumentation advanced here.

Social implications

This research points to major policy implications, as internet-enabled, community-based entrepreneurship may be an important key to overcome many of the adverse circumstances faced by communities the world over, such as climate change, terrorism and paucity of funds for social action.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on community-based entrepreneurship by developing the notion of internet-enabled community resilience, showing how internet-enabled communities can prompt entrepreneurial behavior and result in the enhanced resilience of geographic communities.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Osamuede Odiase, Suzanne Wilkinson and Andreas Neef

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the resilience of the South African community in Auckland to a potential hazard event.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the resilience of the South African community in Auckland to a potential hazard event.

Design/methodology/approach

The research collected data from both primary and secondary sources. The research used parametric and non-parametric analytical procedures for quantitative data and a general inductive approach to qualitative data analysis and a three-step coding cycle for interviews. A content analytical process of theme formation was used to analyse secondary materials. The research discussed findings in line with related studies on community resilience.

Findings

The aggregate community resilience index was above average on the scale of 1–5. The highest and lowest contributions to the resilience of the South African community came from communication and information and physical capacities of the community. Although the highest contribution came from the communication domain, there is a need to sensitise the community on the importance of real-time information for resilience. Community ability to respond as a first responder and to access diverse sources was low because of a lack of interest in disaster risk reduction activities and membership of associations. Intervention in the economic domain and affordable housing is needed to assist low-income earners in coping with a potential disaster and enhance future resilience.

Research limitations/implications

The practical resilience of the community is limited to the time of this research. The state of resilience might change in longitudinal research due to changes in resources and ecosystem. The research did not consider institutional and natural domains because its focus was to predict resilience at the individual level.

Practical implications

At-risk societies could enhance their resilience through a periodic audit into its resources, identify indicators of low resilience and carry out interventions to address potential vulnerabilities. Besides the importance of resource in resilience, the research illuminates the need to address the question of who is resilient and resources distribution in the community. The issues are imperative in community resilience as they underpinned the personal ability to preparedness, response and recover from a disaster.

Originality/value

Although the research provides insight into the resilience of the South African community, it constitutes preliminary research towards a further understanding of the resilience of the South African community in Auckland.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Martina K. Linnenluecke and Brent McKnight

The paper aims to examine the conditions under which disaster entrepreneurship contributes to community-level resilience. The authors define disaster entrepreneurship as…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the conditions under which disaster entrepreneurship contributes to community-level resilience. The authors define disaster entrepreneurship as attempts by the private sector to create or maintain value during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster by taking advantage of business opportunities and providing goods and services required by community stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds a typology of disaster entrepreneurial responses by drawing on the dimensions of structural expansion and role change. The authors use illustrative case examples to conceptualize how these responses improve community resilience by filling critical resource voids in the aftermath of natural disasters.

Findings

The typology identifies four different disaster entrepreneurship approaches: entrepreneurial business continuity, scaling of organizational response through activating latent structures, improvising and emergence. The authors formulate proposition regarding how each of the approaches is related to community-level resilience.

Practical implications

While disaster entrepreneurship can offer for-profit opportunities for engaging in community-wide disaster response and recovery efforts, firms should carefully consider the financial, legal, reputational and organizational implications of disaster entrepreneurship.

Social implications

Communities should consider how best to harness disaster entrepreneurship in designing their disaster response strategies.

Originality/value

This research offers a novel typology to explore the role that for-profit firms play in disaster contexts and adds to prior research which has mostly focused on government agencies, non-governmental organizations and emergency personnel.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Tal Fitzpatrick and Julie Molloy

This case study aims to explore the findings and documented impacts of Volunteering Qld’s “Step Up” programme which is the largest community resilience building programme…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to explore the findings and documented impacts of Volunteering Qld’s “Step Up” programme which is the largest community resilience building programme led by a non-government organisation (NGO) in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

It will describe the programme design and systems that support this type of qualitative work using evidence-based data collected by the project coordinators over the duration of the programme and contextualising these within a broader resilience framework.

Findings

This case study will demonstrate and advocate for the need to create stronger partnerships and more significant opportunities for the sector to engage in resilience-building activities.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this project was limited by organisational capacity to conduct research into its own programme, as it was being delivered and with limited resourcing. There is a significant need for further research into the work of NGOs in the emergency management and disaster resilience and the impacts of these programmes on communities.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this case study is a recognition that there are inherent challenges for disaster management agencies trying to engage communities in dialogue around planning risk-informed response and recovery plans for disasters.

Social implications

However, NGOs are ideally placed to work in and with the communities which they service, to educate and support them at all stages of disaster management.

Originality/value

This is a unique first-hand account of the experience of a NGO delivering community resilience programme in Australia and provides an important insight for practitioners and researchers alike.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Rageshree Sinha and Akinyo Ola

The purpose of the current literature reviews to contribute to the study of organisational resilience. The study intends to understand the role of dynamic capability flow…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current literature reviews to contribute to the study of organisational resilience. The study intends to understand the role of dynamic capability flow in creating more resilient business communities. The study tries to relate to how continuous learning enables business communities to plan for, respond to and bounce back from disasters.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured literature review of 38 empirical studies indicates organisational resilience and highlights the dynamic attributes of organisational resilience and the importance of knowledge interactions and information sharing.

Findings

Continuous learning results in complex dynamic capability manifested through research and innovations, technological implementations, social learnings and community knowledge sharing. This clearly emphasises the role of dynamic capabilities in fostering disaster resilience in organisations and business communities.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations on continuous learning can be cited as to incorporate case study methods related to organisational experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic while also reviewing digital knowledge transfer strategies and influencing factors.

Practical implications

The study for fostering resilience in the business ecosystem needs to be embedded in the continuous learning process, and it also includes knowledge sharing and collaboration, both externally and internally, for the business community.

Social implications

Social implications for this study relate to the seamless flow of the knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing process. The dynamic process of organisational and the business community resilience is a key outcome of this knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer process.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework was developed from the review, emphasising how dynamic capabilities through continuous learning enhance business community resilience.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

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