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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

My-Trinh Bui and Don Jyh-Fu Jeng

The purpose of this study is to investigate coproduction behavior in networking alumni communities via the progress from platform belongingness, knowledge sharing and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate coproduction behavior in networking alumni communities via the progress from platform belongingness, knowledge sharing and citizenship behavior. Alumni networking communities have emerged as valuable assets for conserving institutional resources, supporting members and contributing new resources for alumni-institutional professional development. However, the previous literature has not yet captured the explicit processes by which these contributions are made.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 711 respondents selected from an alumni collaboration network were subjected to structural equation modeling analysis.

Findings

The study explored resource conservation (belongingness) as the primary relational mechanism for alumni to share their instrumental resources (knowledge sharing), supporting resources (citizenship behavior) and competent resources (coproduction behavior). Knowledge sharing and citizenship behavior act as intermediate agents to trigger coproduction behavior. The authors show how subjective norm, group norm and trust is regarded as a tool to reduce bonding intrusiveness (i.e. the intrusive side-effects of a bond) and moderate the indirect effect of belongingness on coproduction and the direct effect of citizenship on coproduction.

Research limitations/implications

By applying attachment theory, conservation of resources theory and digital platform networking perspectives, this study describes major implications for designing inspiring and compatible community platforms.

Practical implications

Guidance is provided for improving sustainable alumni communities through citizenship-sharing and coproduction behavior.

Social implications

Online alumni communities are regarded as resource conservators, which can result in valuable coproduction, via the sharing of knowledge, expertise and skillsets to create profit for a range of institutions and industries.

Originality/value

Alumni networking platforms encourage alumni cohesiveness, stimulate knowledge exchange and improve professionalism.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Denise Bedford and Thomas W. Sanchez

This chapter focuses on community and social group networks. All six facets of knowledge networks are described. The importance of three of the six facets is called out…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

This chapter focuses on community and social group networks. All six facets of knowledge networks are described. The importance of three of the six facets is called out, including geography, domain, and the messages exchanged across the network. The authors provide profiles of five networks, including family networks, neighborhood networks, issue and support networks, community organization networks, gangs and criminal networks, and sports and gaming networks.

Details

Knowledge Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-949-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Telin Chung, Kyuree Kim and Eonyou Shin

The present study aimed to examine the value creation process in an online forum community of a crowdsourcing company by analyzing members' interactions and network structures.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aimed to examine the value creation process in an online forum community of a crowdsourcing company by analyzing members' interactions and network structures.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach was adopted. First, a participation-observation netnographic approach was employed to identify the interactions that lead to the collective creation of three types of value: social, intellectual, and cultural. Second, using social network analysis, the collective value creation process was examined through the network structures, and the key actors and their roles in value creation were identified.

Findings

findings presented that members collectively create value in a unique manner for enhancing product designs in a crowdsourcing community. Three types of value coexisted and were often created inter-dependently. The interactions among the members were not dense yet were fairly knitted without any significant core-periphery structures, indicating a less restrained flow of value. The findings of the study identified that most of the bridging members in the network were likely to have diverse social and intellectual resources.

Originality/value

The present study was one of the first to examine the collective value creation process through a network perspective. In particular, this study offered a richer understanding of the unique collective value creation process in a crowdsourcing community and the role of bridging actors in the network. Implications for crowdsourcing companies are provided to sustain a continuous flow of quality contributions from the forum community members.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Alan Kirschenbaum

This paper utilizes the generic source of “community” to define a disaster community emphasizing disaster areas’ perceived boundaries and the social networks that fall…

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Abstract

This paper utilizes the generic source of “community” to define a disaster community emphasizing disaster areas’ perceived boundaries and the social networks that fall within these boundaries. Three such “disaster communities” are proposed based on family‐kin, micro‐neighborhood, and macro‐neighborhood social networks. Utilizing an Israel national representative sample of (814) urban households residing in 150 municipalities, a set of hypotheses were tested regarding the impact of disaster communities on individual disaster preparedness behaviors. In general, more socially robust communities brought about greater levels of individual preparedness but with significant exceptions by type of preparedness. In addition, the predictive ability of such disaster communities on each preparedness component varied. Ethnic and educational composition of the networks had a negligible impact on disaster preparedness behaviors. Overall, the use of social network based disaster communities provides a sound theoretical and empirical foundation to study disaster behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Dara O’Neil

Community informatics can be defined as a strategy or discipline that focuses on the use of information and communication technologies by territorial communities. This…

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3607

Abstract

Community informatics can be defined as a strategy or discipline that focuses on the use of information and communication technologies by territorial communities. This paper analyzes the emerging community informatics evaluation literature to develop an understanding of the indicators used to gauge project impacts in community networks and community technology centers. This study finds that community networks and community technology center assessments fall into five key areas: strong democracy; social capital; individual empowerment; sense of community; and economic development opportunities. The paper concludes by making recommendations for future community informatics evaluations.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

C.M. Chewar, D. Scott McCrickard and John M. Carroll

This work aims to probe how interface designers concerned with human‐computer interaction of community networks might use the theoretical constructs of social capital and…

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3606

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to probe how interface designers concerned with human‐computer interaction of community networks might use the theoretical constructs of social capital and activity awareness.

Design/methodology/approach

A design model for community network interfaces is introduced that reconciles various computer‐mediated communication research contributions with support for typical community network scenarios of use. Using this model, an inspection is performed on existing community network implementations (available December 2002) and then the adequacy of the model for informing the design process is examined.

Findings

Based on the insight gained through this analysis, a generic prototype and new user evaluation method are introduced that allow survey of user reaction to community network design elements under differing conditions. It is shown how results obtained through this method frame a value‐chain understanding of conceptual tradeoffs.

Research limitations/implications

To demonstrate the new user evaluation method in an analysis of critical design tradeoffs, the issues of persistent virtual identity implementation and usage motivation are probed. However, the evaluation method must be validated with other issues and tested by researchers that were not part of its creation process.

Practical implications

Contributions from this paper include tools (a design model, a generic prototype, and an evaluation method) linking theory with community design artifacts, building on previous work. Evaluators now have indicators for assessing community informatics.

Originality/value

Interface designers of community networks and those interested in social capital theory will appreciate the link between practice and theory provided by this approach.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Leslie John Gadman

The study had three main aims. To better understand and explain commitment dynamics using a commitment based analytical model. To show that commitment is an essential…

Abstract

Purpose

The study had three main aims. To better understand and explain commitment dynamics using a commitment based analytical model. To show that commitment is an essential foundation of synergistic interactions which drive the speed of response to environmental change. To explain why and under what circumstances people in social networks become committed to a common cause. How this leads to authentic identity creation and how both lead successful outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The fieldwork for the study was qualitative and interpretive in nature and used semi-structured interviews to collect the data. As a consequence, the approach was mindful of issues of reflexivity wherein it is acknowledged that the researcher-respondent are conjoined in a sense-making process which is unavoidable and inevitable. It proceeded in three phases: sampling of the case, data gathering, and data analysis. One case was selected in order to increase the depth of the analysis, acquire and report experience with the gathering of new and unfamiliar data.

Findings

The findings suggest that commitment based community networks are primarily driven by concerns. The study shows that in order to shift the concerns of a culture, community network leaders must clearly articulate and gain “buy in” to the concerns to be addressed. They must create and maintain a clear focus and develop a shared sense of commitment among participants. The research reveals a complex interaction between the commitment drivers and the successful outcomes of the project especially the unfolding and alteration of commitments in time and through time at the strategic, transforming and operating levels as circumstances change.

Research limitations/implications

Being qualitative and interpretive in nature, the approach is limited by issues of reflexivity wherein it is acknowledged that the researcher-respondent are conjoined in a sense-making process. While this is unavoidable and inevitable, the findings from this study have implications for research into the impact of community based networking strategies on strategic management because so much strategic planning in business is preoccupied by public reputation.

Practical implications

In taking the position that personal and corporate identity is neither wholly the result of total commitment nor wholly the result of recognition-based identity, the practical implications require a deeper consideration of the challenges surrounding collaborative community models. Because language is used loosely, requests can be made ambiguously and commitments frivolously. The inevitable result is a total breakdown in trust.

Originality/value

This work is highly original because it points to the obvious which few leaders and managers appear to take into account. In those cases where the power of language and commitment are considered, the results are highly positive.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Karri Huhtanen, Heikki Vatiainen, Sami Keski‐Kasari and Jarmo Harju

eduroam™ has already been proved to be a scalable, secure and feasible way for universities and research institutions to connect their wireless networks into a WLAN…

Abstract

Purpose

eduroam™ has already been proved to be a scalable, secure and feasible way for universities and research institutions to connect their wireless networks into a WLAN roaming community, but the advantages of eduroam™ have not yet been fully discovered in the wireless community networks aimed at regular consumers. This aim of this paper is to describe how eduroam™ architecture and technologies can be utilised in building these kinds of wireless community networks and to present the experiences gathered in building the Wireless Tampere community network.

Design/methodology/approach

The eduroam™ architecture and technologies were chosen as the basis of Wireless Tampere community network architecture because of their scalability and security. Deploying eduroam™ technologies and architecture to a wider user base both confirmed old and revealed new issues and solutions in improving the usability and the deployment effort of eduroam™ and similar technologies.

Findings

The eduroam™ technology and architecture can be utilised to build wireless community networks, but additional effort must be allocated in improving the usability and the ease of deployment when consumers, company and other regular users are involved. The improvements achieved would not have been developed if the concept and architecture had not been exposed to consumer and company users. The development of both the eduroam™ and Wireless Tampere concept requires deploying them to a wider audience and improving them iteratively utilising the existing solutions as the basis for new improvements.

Originality/value

The paper presents the issues and problems, which were confronted when applying eduroam™ technologies in building the Wireless Tampere community network. The solutions found and deployment experiences presented can be utilised in improving eduroam™ as well as a basis for developing new, open and inter‐connected wireless community networks.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2016

Claudia Magallanes-Blanco and Leandro Rodriguez-Medina

The main goal of the paper is to explore the origins and developments of the first community cellular network in Mexico.

Abstract

Purpose

The main goal of the paper is to explore the origins and developments of the first community cellular network in Mexico.

Methodology/approach

Data were gathered in 2015 and 2016 through in-depth interviews, participant observation, workshops, photos, official documents, and informal interviews in the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico. Data was also drawn from the work of two activists, P. Bloom and E. Huerta, working with the community assemblies of a number of Indígena communities: Villa Talea de Castro, Santa María Yaviche, San Juan Yaee, San Ildefonso Villa Alta, San Bernardo Mixetepec, Santa Ana Tlahuitoltepec, San Jerónimo Progreso, Santiago Ayuquililla, San Miguel Huautla, Santa Inés de Zaragoza, Santo Domingo Xagacia, San Pablo Yaganiza, San Pedro Cajonos, San Francisco Cajonos, San Miguel Cajonos, San Mateo Cajonos, Santa María Alotepec, and San Juan Tabaá. To analyze the data, using codes created in Atlas.TI and relying on an inductive approach, we analyzed the history of this network within a theoretical framework informed by Actor-Network Theory.

Findings

Participants in the enactment of this cellular network followed two programs of actions, one technical and one legal. Together, the community assemblies and activists took advantage of available devices, free software and ordinary computers, on the one hand, and communal rules, national laws, constitutional reforms and tacit knowledge, on the other hand. They brought about a new, non-profit, communitarian, and self-organized network that allows for inexpensive communication between members of small, marginalized Indígena communities in the state of Oaxaca in Mexico.

Social implications

The arrangement of actants that the case illustrates is replicable in other parts of the country and outside of Mexico. The new community cellular network reduces the economic costs of communication, facilitates some jobs and family bonds, expands the range of community-owned projects, encourages self-organization and ways of situated conflict resolution, and empowers communities in relation to external powerful telecommunication corporations.

Originality/value

This is a novel account of a highly unusual set of community-led institutional innovations based on firsthand information drawn from the main actants of the new network.

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-481-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Samrat Gupta and Swanand Deodhar

Communities representing groups of agents with similar interests or functions are one of the essential features of complex networks. Finding communities in real-world…

Abstract

Purpose

Communities representing groups of agents with similar interests or functions are one of the essential features of complex networks. Finding communities in real-world networks is critical for analyzing complex systems in various areas ranging from collaborative information to political systems. Given the different characteristics of networks and the capability of community detection in handling a plethora of societal problems, community detection methods represent an emerging area of research. Contributing to this field, the authors propose a new community detection algorithm based on the hybridization of node and link granulation.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed algorithm utilizes a rough set-theoretic concept called closure on networks. Initial sets are constructed by using neighborhood topology around the nodes as well as links and represented as two different categories of granules. Subsequently, the authors iteratively obtain the constrained closure of these sets. The authors use node mutuality and link mutuality as merging criteria for node and link granules, respectively, during the iterations. Finally, the constrained closure subsets of nodes and links are combined and refined using the Jaccard similarity coefficient and a local density function to obtain communities in a binary network.

Findings

Extensive experiments conducted on twelve real-world networks followed by a comparison with state-of-the-art methods demonstrate the viability and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

Research limitations/implications

The study also contributes to the ongoing effort related to the application of soft computing techniques to model complex systems. The extant literature has integrated a rough set-theoretic approach with a fuzzy granular model (Kundu and Pal, 2015) and spectral clustering (Huang and Xiao, 2012) for node-centric community detection in complex networks. In contributing to this stream of work, the proposed algorithm leverages the unexplored synergy between rough set theory, node granulation and link granulation in the context of complex networks. Combined with experiments of network datasets from various domains, the results indicate that the proposed algorithm can effectively reveal co-occurring disjoint, overlapping and nested communities without necessarily assigning each node to a community.

Practical implications

This study carries important practical implications for complex adaptive systems in business and management sciences, in which entities are increasingly getting organized into communities (Jacucci et al., 2006). The proposed community detection method can be used for network-based fraud detection by enabling experts to understand the formation and development of fraudulent setups with an active exchange of information and resources between the firms (Van Vlasselaer et al., 2017). Products and services are getting connected and mapped in every walk of life due to the emergence of a variety of interconnected devices, social networks and software applications.

Social implications

The proposed algorithm could be extended for community detection on customer trajectory patterns and design recommendation systems for online products and services (Ghose et al., 2019; Liu and Wang, 2017). In line with prior research, the proposed algorithm can aid companies in investigating the characteristics of implicit communities of bloggers or social media users for their services and products so as to identify peer influencers and conduct targeted marketing (Chau and Xu, 2012; De Matos et al., 2014; Zhang et al., 2016). The proposed algorithm can be used to understand the behavior of each group and the appropriate communication strategy for that group. For instance, a group using a specific language or following a specific account might benefit more from a particular piece of content than another group. The proposed algorithm can thus help in exploring the factors defining communities and confronting many real-life challenges.

Originality/value

This work is based on a theoretical argument that communities in networks are not only based on compatibility among nodes but also on the compatibility among links. Building up on the aforementioned argument, the authors propose a community detection method that considers the relationship among both the entities in a network (nodes and links) as opposed to traditional methods, which are predominantly based on relationships among nodes only.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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