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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

Monique S. Johnson

Although rental housing has historically maintained a peripheral position within the community-building sphere, the current economic volatility is evidence of how…

Abstract

Although rental housing has historically maintained a peripheral position within the community-building sphere, the current economic volatility is evidence of how imbalanced housing policy can impact overall stability, particularly among low-income people within low-income communities. Economic and other macro-environmental shifts will have lasting and poignant impacts on low-income geographies; therefore, the state of rental housing within the context of urban neighborhoods will continue to be a critical policy matter. This research explores whether the low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) program encourages the development of housing with the physical and operational attributes that strengthen low-income neighborhoods. Given the program's growing dominance, this study analyzes whether specific characteristics associated with neighborhood revitalization are prevalent in LIHTC properties located within qualified census tracts. Also examined are the methodologies among nonprofit developers and for-profit developers relative to these development characteristics.

The findings indicate that properties under 50 units are more likely to be located within suburban qualified census tracts. Within the urban core, the results reveal that qualified census tract LIHTC developments are more often serving extremely low and low-income families. The research outcomes also show that nonprofit developers are more likely to serve lower incomes and utilize certified property management agents for these properties. Given the unique needs of urban and suburban low-income neighborhoods and a national environment that portents a growing dependence upon the LIHTC, the findings suggest that both enhanced coordination between state, regional, and local interests and innovation in resource allocation policy are critical to erasing the neighborhood divide that marginalizes low-income people in low-income communities.

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Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

Jonathan Rosenberg

This paper gives an account of the development and pioneering management practices of a community‐owned and managed agency, Walterton and Elgin Community Homes (WECH)…

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618

Abstract

Purpose

This paper gives an account of the development and pioneering management practices of a community‐owned and managed agency, Walterton and Elgin Community Homes (WECH), locating these in the context of continuing concerns and emerging aspirations over the role of social housing, with developing UK national policy and a proposed statutory “Right to Transfer” for tenants.

Design/methodology/approach

This report provides a narrative of the recent development of social housing policy development and the evolving practice of WECH. This is the essential historical and social policy background to a recent study into the health and well‐being benefits of empowerment through community ownership of social housing. This first paper refers to and discusses the wider implications of the data collected during the well‐being research and literature review, indicating that the population of the WECH estates experience a sense of belonging, and of being involved, which contrasts markedly with statistics for comparable populations in comparable areas of deprivation. Further analysis of the key findings of the original study will be published in Part two.

Findings

The benefits of more community‐owned services include the more efficient and holistic management of properties. Community‐based, resident‐controlled housing associations offer a secure foundation for building in additional services as part of the continued drive to devolve public services to the local level, including hosting of a substantial range of community services, for example the reintegration of the Police into the community. The principle of community ownership of council estates is also valuable in its own right for informing the direction of housing management and policy and where to target effort. The experience and practice of WECH supports the proposition that community ownership of social housing may be an exceptionally effective means for improving and sustaining wellbeing in poor neighbourhoods.

Research limitations/implications

This paper argues that Government policy should actively support mass mutualisation as a means for improving wellbeing on council/social housing estates and for empowering poorer communities to take greater responsibility for their welfare. Regardless of the extent of mutualisation, many of the practices involved are transferable to non‐mutual social landlords, and may be seen as markers of good practice for agencies intending to taken on social housing via transfer.

Originality/value

There is continued interest in the transfer of social housing stock to new provider agencies. WECH has been the only large‐scale statutory transfer until now of council housing in England and Wales to a mutual, community‐owned housing association. WECH's experience is especially relevant for evidencing the significant advantages governments could obtain through encouraging many more transfers of council estates to community housing associations.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

JoDee Keller

In this study of one housing development in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, this chapter explores concerns of families with children, including safety…

Abstract

In this study of one housing development in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, this chapter explores concerns of families with children, including safety of community, relationships with neighbors, and accessibility of services, and examines challenges faced by families in the process of relocation. Before redevelopment, this particular community consisted of a large number of immigrants and refugees in two-parent or multigenerational families, as well as older residents, dispelling stereotypes of public housing residents as living in largely single-parent, female-headed households. Additionally, the chapter explores the strengths and resiliency of this population.

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Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Simon Evans, Teresa Atkinson, Robin Darton, Ailsa Cameron, Ann Netten, Randall Smith and Jeremy Porteus

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of housing with care schemes to act as community hubs. The analysis highlights a range of benefits, barriers and facilitators.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of housing with care schemes to act as community hubs. The analysis highlights a range of benefits, barriers and facilitators.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are presented from the Adult Social Services Environments and Settings project which used a mixed methods approach including a review of the literature, surveys and in-depth case study interviews.

Findings

Most housing with care schemes have a restaurant or café, communal lounge, garden, hairdresser, activity room and laundrette, while many also have a library, gym, computer access and a shop. Many of these facilities are open not just to residents but also to the wider community, reflecting a more integrated approach to community health and adult social care, by sharing access to primary health care and social services between people living in the scheme and those living nearby. Potential benefits of this approach include the integration of older people’s housing, reduced isolation and increased cost effectiveness of local services through economies of scale and by maximising preventative approaches to health and wellbeing. Successful implementation of the model depends on a range of criteria including being located within or close to a residential area and having on-site facilities that are accessible to the public.

Originality/value

This paper is part of a very new literature on community hub models of housing with care in the UK. In the light of new requirements under the Care Act to better coordinate community services, it provides insights into how this approach can work and offers an analysis of the benefits and challenges that will be of interest to commissioners and providers as well as planners. This was a small scale research project based on four case studies. Caution should be taken when considering the findings in different settings.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Ling‐Hin Li

The purpose of this paper is to study the major pull factors on residents' attachment to their own housing community. This examination will lead to better understanding of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the major pull factors on residents' attachment to their own housing community. This examination will lead to better understanding of consumer behavior in the housing market.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire survey and examination of the data was conducted by the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), which was supplemented by multiple regression analysis.

Findings

It was found that two major factors determine community attachment and hence housing choice. Safety of community determines residents' attachment to their own housing community. Sense of belonging affects residents' willingness to stay. It implies that residents do have strong perception of what the image of their own community is like, and positive management of community can enhance such image and therefore the sense of belonging.

Research limitations/implications

The database used is relatively small.

Originality/value

Neighborhood attachment has been well‐researched, but not much has been done in Hong Kong where most housing communities are high rise‐high density. An understanding of the factors pulling residents' attachment towards certain housing community will provide more insight into housing choice decision making.

Details

Property Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Oladotun Ayoade and Vian Ahmed

– The aim of this study is to define land use policy sources of barriers to community-based housing options in practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to define land use policy sources of barriers to community-based housing options in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper accentuated the need to tackle land use sources of barrier to Community Land Trust (CLT) performance, through text analysis of semi-structured interview responses from key stakeholders.

Findings

This study found out that there is a need to ameliorate stakeholder approach to community-based housing (CBH), which is hampered by restrictive land use sources of barriers that occur in an urban and rural context. These barriers were found to include both planning inadequacies and a systemic inefficient network of knowledge transfer practices between stakeholders. Recommendations include the need for drastic policy intervention through the political willingness to address Section 106 shortcomings in the choice of affordable housing supply models, and the inaccessibility of land below market rate in an endogenous prescriptive planning system.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the subjective limitations of the CLT model in regards to grey areas between setting boundaries to what is an acceptable level of concessions to CBH and the socio-economic impact or benefits of a completely deregulated social housing system. These boundaries do vary from system to system, hence the need for UK housing institutions to address identified inherent barrier sources and their reconciliation with international best practices. Therefore, greater roles can be accorded to the CLT model in the UK affordable housing dynamics based on its confirmed strengths and merits.

Originality/value

This paper adds to literature through the practical identification and interpretation of various key stakeholder perspectives on sources of CLT barriers and an idealised strategy to tackling them accordingly. This contributes to the housing affordability debate on the viability of CBH options, and how it could be invariably hampered by direct and indirect effects of planning and restrictive land use policies in practice.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Nie-Jia Yau, Ming-Kuan Tsai and Eryani Nurma Yulita

Natural hazards occur frequently in Indonesia. When post-disaster recovery is prolonged and complicated, it is necessary to provide accommodations for homeless refugees in…

Abstract

Purpose

Natural hazards occur frequently in Indonesia. When post-disaster recovery is prolonged and complicated, it is necessary to provide accommodations for homeless refugees in disaster areas. Since a transitional housing solution includes planning, design and execution phases, the design phase implements the decisions made in the planning phase and also affects the results of the execution phase. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to assist communities to effectively deal with various processes during the design phase involving transitional housing solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on eight factors associated with “building back better” and ten principles of transitional housing, the paper identified three problems in the design phase: inappropriate selection of settlement sites, improper representation of housing facilities and ineffective scheduling of construction projects. To resolve these problems, this study integrated a geographic information system (GIS), three-dimensional (3D) building models and construction project management tools to assess settlement sites, confirm housing facilities and configure construction projects, respectively.

Findings

After this study tested conventional methods (e.g. paper-based maps, drawings, reports) and the proposed approach, the results revealed that communities can appropriately determine settlement sites based on the GIS. The 3D building models enabled the communities to understand the external and internal layouts of housing facilities. Through construction project management, the communities could consider construction activities immediately when preparing the execution phase for transitional housing solutions.

Originality/value

This study offers a useful reference for similar applications in post-disaster reconstruction and management.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Nuwan Tharanga Dias, Kaushal Keraminiyage and Kushani Kulasthri DeSilva

After tsunami 2004, it was estimated that more than 98,000 permanent houses had to be rebuilt. However, ten years on, as communities, are they satisfied in their new…

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Abstract

Purpose

After tsunami 2004, it was estimated that more than 98,000 permanent houses had to be rebuilt. However, ten years on, as communities, are they satisfied in their new homes? What are the indicators affecting the long-term satisfaction of resettled communities in relation to their new permanent houses. The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively evaluate the level of long-term satisfaction of two tsunami affected resettled communities in Sri Lanka in a bid to identify the indicators affecting the long-term satisfaction of post disaster resettled communities in relation to permanent housing.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to the thorough literature review conducted to evaluate the state of the art in the subject area, a series of interviews were conducted with experts and tsunami affected communities in Sri Lanka to gather primary data for this research. The literature review is used to establish the initial list of indicators of long-term satisfaction of resettlements. The expert interviews and the community interviews were used to verify and refine the initially identified indicators.

Findings

A sustainable resettlement programme is just not merely reconstruction of a set of houses. A resettlement programme should re-establish the socio-economic and cultural life of people. Reconstruction of a house does not solve the housing issue; it is vital to look in to the indicators which can convert a house into a home and the surrounding into a neighbourhood.

Originality/value

This paper makes a significant contribution in terms of identifying indicators affecting the long-term community satisfaction with resettlement programmes taking into account economic, social and cultural factors with a special emphasis on post tsunami resettlements in Sri Lanka.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Heidi H. Ewen and Andrew Carswell

From the consumer side, this paper aims to highlight some of the various characteristics that older renters seek out from their apartment buildings, relative to…

Abstract

Purpose

From the consumer side, this paper aims to highlight some of the various characteristics that older renters seek out from their apartment buildings, relative to conventional multifamily residential buildings and, from the operational side, to examine some of the costs involved in daily operation of such buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The Rental Housing Finance Survey provides data that enables scholars to test empirical differences in amenities and costs between senior-oriented communities and other apartment buildings.

Findings

Occupancy rates outpace the rate for all other apartment communities. Regarding amenities, senior apartment communities are more likely than other communities to have a fitness center on premises, but less likely to have a swimming pool. Market value for senior properties is usually less than properties marketed toward multi-family property tenants. This difference may be due to a higher pattern of both operating/capital expenses within senior communities. Part of these increases in operating costs is due to a higher propensity to hire professional management companies and a higher fee for managing senior apartment communities.

Originality/value

Literature on seniors living within apartment communities is somewhat sparse, particularly regarding the operational aspects of managing apartment communities. There is a dearth of information on industry success measurements known as operating and capital expenditures. This study triangulates multiple sources of data to investigate differences in cost of senior housing apartment communities, as well as amenity structures.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Peter M. Lawther

Housing is perhaps the most common component of a community’s manufactured capital wealth stocks damaged or destroyed by natural disasters. Consequently the restoration of…

Abstract

Housing is perhaps the most common component of a community’s manufactured capital wealth stocks damaged or destroyed by natural disasters. Consequently the restoration of housing in the recovery process takes on a paramount significance. This significance is magnified by the complexity of housing restoration and the varying and specialised skill sets required to deliver it. Such complexity is exemplified through both the different phases of post-disaster housing required following a disaster and the role of housing in the broader socio-ecological system of a community. Housing is inextricably linked to livelihoods, physical and mental health, security and social capital. Successful post-disaster restoration of housing must identify and embrace such linkages. This paper explores this notion through examination of the impact of the permanent housing reconstruction of the T. Vilufushi community, Maldives, following the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, which completely destroyed the island of Vilufushi. The community were temporarily relocated for 4½ years whilst Vilufushi was totally reconstructed by the Government of Maldives and the British Red Cross. Such reconstruction was undertaken to cater for not only the original population of 1800, but also a projected population of 5000, as the Government of Maldives utilised the opportunity afforded by the Tsunami to pursue its longstanding population consolidation policy. The post-occupancy impact of the permanent housing reconstruction program upon the wider socio-ecological system of the Vilufushi community is explored via a qualitative research methodology utilising the four wealth capitals of sustainable development as its analytical framework. Field data collection methods comprised focus group discussions, key informant interviews and observations. This was supplemented with ongoing document collection and review. Data was analysed using a pattern match technique / content analysis, preceding a holistic recovery network analysis. Results of the research indicate that the delivery of the permanent housing on Vilufushi has undermined the human, natural and social capital wealth stocks of the community. The implications are that permanent housing reconstruction needs to be considered as much as a social process, as an engineering process. This in turn, has implications for the skillsets of those charged to deliver such projects, and also the organisations that employ them.

Details

Open House International, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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