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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Steven Edwards

This paper follows a project undertaken by the University of Zululand in conjunction with local organisations. A description of the Zululand Mental Health Community

Abstract

This paper follows a project undertaken by the University of Zululand in conjunction with local organisations. A description of the Zululand Mental Health Community Psychology Programme provides an example of progress through partnerships between the University and those groups. It also examines the mental health model in relation to the social action, organisational, ecological and phenomenological models of community psychology in the Zululand context. A holistic, community psychological mental health model is introduced, based on promotion and prevention models.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Anne M. Hewitt

Purpose – A structured comparison, based on underlying social ecological constructs, provides the framework for this preliminary investigation of the commonalities and…

Abstract

Purpose – A structured comparison, based on underlying social ecological constructs, provides the framework for this preliminary investigation of the commonalities and differences between three emerging approaches to health disparities: community-based participatory research (CBPR), community-focused health outreach (CFHO), and community health promotion programs (CHPP).

Methodology/approach – A conceptual review and preliminary analysis at the macrolevel of major community trends that focus on eliminating health disparity outcomes.

Findings – Each of the three community health approaches share similar purposes using community-focused collaborative efforts, but involve different change agents, levels of partnership, timeframes, social participation, and implementation methodologies.

Research limitations/implications – Additional in-depth literature reviews and meta-evaluations highlighting the contributions of each of the three approaches (CPBR, CFHO, and CHPP) are strongly recommended.

Practical implications – Interested community stakeholders can monitor results and impacts of each of the three approaches within their environments.

Originality/value of paper – Past reviews have concentrated on isolating individual contributing social causes of health disparities. This analysis introduces three emerging trends that currently function within community-based frameworks as potential mechanisms for helping the health disadvantaged.

Details

Social Sources of Disparities in Health and Health Care and Linkages to Policy, Population Concerns and Providers of Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-835-9

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Farah Barbir

Community‐based research requires the involvement of both the community and researchers to investigate the influence of existing political, social and structural factors…

1577

Abstract

Community‐based research requires the involvement of both the community and researchers to investigate the influence of existing political, social and structural factors on the health of individuals and communities. In the Bekaa Valley of Lebanon, a community‐based intervention is proposed, as part of an EU INCO DEV‐funded project that aims to assess reproductive health care among Bedouin in Lebanon and Jordan. This intervention intends to train Bedouin community health volunteers (CHVs) to spread reproductive and child health knowledge and awareness among the Bedouin community and link them to the existing primary health care centres. The challenges facing this intervention relate to the existing political atmosphere and the difficult process of building and maintaining a partnership between the research team and the Bedouin. Evidence from the data‐collection phase and the current implementation phase of the Bedouin project has shown that the positive outcomes that result from community‐based interventions can be outweighed by the burden of obstacles and challenges that arise. These have to be carefully anticipated and tackled to guarantee a successful intervention. This paper will explore these obstacles and highlight some recommendations for implementing a community‐based intervention on the basis of our experience with the Bedouin.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

C.A.K. Yesudian

This paper deals with the effectiveness of using the community organisation approach in a community health programme. It describes a pilot project in one of the slum…

Abstract

This paper deals with the effectiveness of using the community organisation approach in a community health programme. It describes a pilot project in one of the slum pockets in Bombay in India where the municipal health post workers were helped to adopt the community organisation approach to implement an immunisation programme. The various strategies used to demonstrate the usefulness of the community organisation approach, and the process of training the health staff towards adopting this approach, are described in the paper.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Neil Quinn and Hannah Biggs

There are significant inequalities in mental health, with mental health problems and poor mental health more common in areas of deprivation. Current policy in Scotland…

Abstract

There are significant inequalities in mental health, with mental health problems and poor mental health more common in areas of deprivation. Current policy in Scotland acknowledges the impact of social and environmental factors on community mental health and well‐being and the need for public mental health to engage with regeneration initiatives. This study, based in a low‐income community in east Glasgow, assesses what factors influence community mental health and well‐being and how to develop par tnerships to address these issues. It involved a workshop with community planning agencies and residents' groups in east Glasgow, an action research project with local residents and a validation event with local residents. The study found that social circumstances influenced mental health and well‐being, with people having concerns about their neighbourhood and environment, with antisocial behaviour emerging as a major factor contributing to residents feeling unsafe, isolated and unhappy living in the area. At the same time, residents talked a lot about how happy they felt about the community they were par t of and the impor tant role that social capital can play in low‐income areas in promoting well‐being. The study also highlights the need for par tnerships between health and other sectors and the impor tance of ensuring multi‐agency working that embeds public mental health within the agendas of housing and regeneration sectors. Finally, it demonstrates that action research between par tner agencies and communities will be more effective in identifying key issues and that within such a process, there is more likely to be ‘buy in’ from these agencies to bring about social change.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Dennise Albrecht

In an increasing trend, clients are being moved from tertiary and secondary care to primary care. This “downloading”, accompanied by the increasingly complex needs of…

1006

Abstract

In an increasing trend, clients are being moved from tertiary and secondary care to primary care. This “downloading”, accompanied by the increasingly complex needs of clients, has forced providers and policy makers to acknowledge the importance of primary care. In exploring options for the reorganization of primary care, the characteristics of community health centres are often promoted as the model with the best potential. This article outlines a descriptive overview of community health centres (CHCs) across Canada.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Sally Nathan, Elizabeth Harris, Lynn Kemp and Ben Harris‐Roxas

This paper sets out to report attitudes of staff on key health service committees towards community participation before and after appointment of community representatives.

711

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to report attitudes of staff on key health service committees towards community participation before and after appointment of community representatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows a self‐completed questionnaire administered to staff on committees as a baseline measure and 12 months after community representatives had been appointed.

Findings

The paper finds that significantly more staff at the follow‐up survey reported that they and other staff were clear about the role of community representatives and how to work with them on committees. Significantly more staff at follow‐up felt that the health service was ready for this type of initiative. There was no significant increase in the percentage of staff who felt that financial and other supports for community representatives were sufficient and no significant changes in staff views about the potential for community representatives to influence decision making, although there were strong trends in a positive direction.

Research limitations/implications

The study in this paper was conducted in one health service and did not follow changes in attitudes of particular staff over time. Larger samples would be necessary to assess generalisability of findings and future studies should examine in more depth staff beliefs about the role and influence of community members on committees.

Practical implications

The paper implies that the development of ongoing and constructive relationships between health services and communities clearly takes time and, at least in part, results from direct experience working alongside community members.

Originality/value

The paper shows that this is the first study examining how the attitudes of health service staff to community participation change over time and as a direct result of interaction with community members on committees. A better understanding of health service staff attitudes to community participation is important for health care managers to effectively address structural and attitudinal barriers to community participation.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Helen Tucker

There is a strong tradition of integration in rural community hospitals which has been largely unrecognised in the past. The national strategy for health in England now…

Abstract

There is a strong tradition of integration in rural community hospitals which has been largely unrecognised in the past. The national strategy for health in England now gives community hospitals a central role in providing integrated health and social care, in a policy referred to as ‘care closer to home’. The evidence emerging from international and national studies is demonstrating the benefit of the community hospital model of care. Public support for community hospitals over their 100‐year history has been strong, with value being placed on accessibility, quality and continuity. There is, however, a tension between the national policy and the current financial pressures to close or reduce services in one in three community hospitals in England. Innovative ways of owning and managing these services are being put forward by communities who are actively seeking to maintain and develop their local hospitals. The challenge is to demonstrate that community hospital services are valued models of person‐centred integrated care, and to demonstrate their contribution to the health and well‐being of their communities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2022

Abyshey Nhedzi, Sadiyya Haffejee, Michelle O'Reilly and Panos Vostanis

This study aims to establish the perspectives of community providers on challenges and enablers in developing child mental health capacity in disadvantaged communities in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish the perspectives of community providers on challenges and enablers in developing child mental health capacity in disadvantaged communities in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors involved 29 community providers operating in a large urban-deprived area in the Gauteng Province, east of Johannesburg. Community providers had educational, social and health care backgrounds. Their perspectives were captured through three focus groups, two participatory workshops and reflective diaries. Data were integrated and subjected to inductive thematic analysis.

Findings

Three interlinked themes were identified. Community mobilization was viewed as pre-requisite through mental health awareness and strategies to engage children, youth and parents. Service provision should take into consideration contextual factors, predominantly inequalities, lack of basic needs and gender-based issues (domestic violence, teenage pregnancy and single motherhood). Participants referred to severe mental health needs, and related to physical health conditions, disabilities and impairments, rather than to common mental health problems or wellbeing. They proposed that capacity building should tap into existing resources and integrate with support systems through collaborative working.

Practical implications

Child mental health policy and service design in Majority World Countries (MWCs), should involve all informal and structural support systems and stakeholders. Contextual factors require consideration, especially in disadvantaged communities and low-resource settings, and should be addressed through joined up working.

Originality/value

Children’s mental health needs are largely unmet in MWC-disadvantaged communities. These findings capture the experiences and perspectives of various community providers on how to enhance mental health provision by mobilizing communities and resources.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Amanda K. Damarin, Zack Marshall and Lawrence Bryant

This chapter examines how people weigh and discuss opportunities for collective action to improve community health. Drawing from research on civic and social movement…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines how people weigh and discuss opportunities for collective action to improve community health. Drawing from research on civic and social movement engagement, it focuses specifically on how cultural logics of pragmatism, activism, and cynicism are invoked in such debates.

Methodology/approach

Qualitative data come from four focus group discussions of strategies for reducing tobacco use in Atlanta’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities. Participants included 36 self-identified community members.

Findings

Pragmatic logics were used most often in evaluating the tobacco control strategies, with activist logics second and cynicism a distant third. This echoes prior research, but our participants used these logics in unexpected ways: they combined pragmatism and activism, downplaying the former’s emphasis on individual self-interest and the latter’s emphasis on contentious confrontation. In addition, use of the logics varied by focus group and strategy, but not with individual speaker’s identities.

Research limitations/implications

Though limited by a narrow demographic focus and small convenience sample, our study suggests that public support for community health initiatives will likely depend on how they are framed and on the interactional dynamics and shared identities of the groups they are presented to.

Originality/value

Logics of pragmatism, activism, and cynicism inform debate over community health initiatives, as with other forms of civic action. However, use of these logics is not uniform but varies with the groups and issues at hand. Our study participants’ mutual LGBT identification gave them a sense of shared community and a familiarity with the politicization of personal life that led them to combine pragmatist and activist logics in novel ways.

Details

Special Social Groups, Social Factors and Disparities in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-467-9

Keywords

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