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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Andrew Bird, Tom Blaney and John Burton

Data communications is a relatively neglected topic, which issurprising as it offers the infrastructural platform that can help toprovide organizations with flexibility…

Abstract

Data communications is a relatively neglected topic, which is surprising as it offers the infrastructural platform that can help to provide organizations with flexibility and responsiveness. DataComms 2000 explores the business themes and issues, and technology drivers and focus that will shape the industry. Explores the perspectives of a range of different actors.

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Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

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Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2018

Jane Lockwood

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework that is of practical use to those who are coaching for enhanced communication in the contact centre industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework that is of practical use to those who are coaching for enhanced communication in the contact centre industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptualization of this framework has emerged after several years of working, as an applied linguist and consultant in this industry.

Findings

The interdisciplinary framework proposed in this paper draws on the adult learning theory, on language assessment and applied linguistic practices and studies carried out looking at how competency is developed at work. It proposes four levels of competency from novice to expert with the attendant coaching approach to best target the needs of communications coachees in this industry.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for improved coaching practices in the contact centre industry where there is heavy investment in coaching on the floor. Research limitations are that although there is strong anecdotal evidence that this framework and approach to coaching is effective, the authors need to carry out a large-scale study showing business impact.

Practical implications

The implications for coaching practitioners are that they have an informed theoretical framework upon which to base their coaching activity. This provides a more targeted approach to the needs of coachees of different levels of experience.

Social implications

As a result of effective coaching, particularly at the early stages of working in a contact centre, the level of attrition may drop thus providing employees with work in a supportive environment.

Originality/value

No previous study has looked at how theoretical studies in adult learning and applied linguistic practice can inform communications coaching in this industry. It has also involved the quality assurance specialists in collaborating and contributing to this model.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Nipa Saha

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the historic development of advertising regulation that governs food advertising to children in Australia. Through reviewing primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, this paper examines the influence of various regulatory policies that limit children’s exposure to food and beverage marketing on practices across television (TV), branded websites and Facebook pages.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews studies performed by the food industry and public health researchers and reviews of the evidence by government and non-government agencies from the early 19th century until the present day. Also included are several other research studies that evaluate the effects of self-regulation on Australian TV food advertising.

Findings

The government, public health and the food industry have attempted to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. However, self-regulation is failing to protect Australian children from exposure to unhealthy food advertising.

Practical implications

The findings could aid the food and beverage industry, and the self-regulatory system, to promote comprehensive and achievable solutions to the growing obesity rates in Australia by introducing new standards that keep pace with expanded forms of marketing communication.

Originality/value

This study adds to the research on the history of regulation of food advertising to children in Australia by offering insights into the government, public health and food industry’s attempts to respond to the rapid changes within the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes.

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Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Mikko V.J. Heikkinen, Thomas Casey and Fabio Hecht

When comparing novel centralized and distributed communications and video streaming services, the authors identified a need for a theoretic framework to position a

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1130

Abstract

Purpose

When comparing novel centralized and distributed communications and video streaming services, the authors identified a need for a theoretic framework to position a multitude of ICT services and technologies according to their value proposition. Literature does not integrate existing value analysis concepts into a holistic theoretical framework. This paper aims to address this shortcoming by proposing a value analysis framework for ICT services capable of describing the value exchanges between different actors and their role constellations based on technological componentizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper evaluates a representative selection of communications and video streaming services and an extensive literature study on existing value analysis research was conducted to develop the framework and to verify it.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the applicability of the value analysis framework in communications and video streaming case studies, which are technically very different from each other but, at the abstraction level the framework provides, display very similar characteristics in value flows and role constellations.

Research limitations/implications

The value analysis framework could be extended and verified with other case studies and complemented with quantitative modeling and system dynamics.

Originality/value

The authors combine existing literature into a proposal of a holistic value analysis framework and apply it to novel centralized and distributed communications and video streaming services. Both academics and practitioners can use the framework to evaluate the value proposition of ICT services and technologies.

Details

info, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Abstract

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Silicon Valley North
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08044-457-4

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Hsien‐Tang Ko and Hsi‐Peng Lu

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into firms' innovation competencies and to develop an instrument to examine the key innovation competencies that contribute to…

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2647

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into firms' innovation competencies and to develop an instrument to examine the key innovation competencies that contribute to integrated services.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via the initial 80‐item questionnaire given to innovation‐related key figures within the Taiwanese communications industry (sample size 500; valid response rate 75.4 percent). The initial 80 items of innovation competencies and development procedures of measurement instrument were explored, exploited, and analyzed. The instrument validity of the multi‐aspect innovation competencies measure was evaluated through assessing convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity.

Findings

Research results indicate that five‐dimension and 17‐item constructs the measurement instrument of innovation competencies for integrated services. An examination of individual dimensions' effect on “overall innovation competencies” shows that industry specific (0.45) is the most important dimension, followed by market related (0.23), technology related (0.14), product related (0.13), and organization related (0.13).

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted in only one industry (communications) and one country (Taiwan).

Practical implications

Integration capabilities of different innovation competencies of a firm is vital for the successful development of integrated services, and out of all the innovation competencies, industry‐specific innovation competencies are the most important. A firm should then identify potential markets and trends and fully utilize their human resource capabilities to develop innovative services, along with senior executives' awareness and acceptance of risk.

Originality/value

This paper may be the first to identify the measurement instrument of innovation competencies for integrated services and will expand the scope of service innovation research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

IT is accorded a central role in Malaysian Industrial Master Plan 2 (IMP2), not only as the foundation for the future development of the manufacturing sector, but also, as…

Abstract

IT is accorded a central role in Malaysian Industrial Master Plan 2 (IMP2), not only as the foundation for the future development of the manufacturing sector, but also, as the engine of development and growth of other sectors of the economy. To fulfill this central role, what should be the value of IT Products and IT Services? We have computed the necessary capital stock of IT Products at RM21.556 billion in 1978 prices, each unit of which is to produce five times its value in output in the year 2005, for a start. The targeted output of IT Services would be another RM 21.556 billion in 1978 prices, for a total of RM43.112 billion for IT industry in 2005. Bill Gates, Chairman and CEO of Microsoft Corporation, holds that Broadband Network Technology (BNT) indispensable to implement the Information Highway would not be available to most US homes for at least a decade. No matter when BNT arrives, an overriding question is: what will be the UTILIZATION of the exploding multimedia content of the Information Superskyway. How will people USE 1,000 times the current content, arriving 1,000 times as fast? The raison d'etre of the Information Superskyway is the Matrix of Learning, with Content as the rows, Context as the columns, and Learning as the Cells. The user has to identify his (her) context of use (entertain‐ment, education, enlightenment, edification). Investment in input (con‐tent) will depend on the answer to the question: By how much will the context be impaired by delay or deficiency of the content (data)? As the capacity of chips increases exponentially, the price drops dramatically — already it is down to $0.14 per megabyte! In the future, a holographic memory of the size of one's fists could hold the contents of the entire Library of Congress. With fast and furious developments in transfer and transformation of multi‐media content, how should one go about investing in IT to reap the bounty of BNT? We have no guarantee of success; we can increase the probability of success in the long‐run using seven IT investment Considerations/Criteria: (1) Choose the “Long‐run” that is realistic: Consider the odds against surviving one year, let alone 10 years; and choose wisely. (2) Choose Your Segment of the IT Industry: Are you most competent in: communications, computers, or content industries? What is your primary product: information, education, enlightenment, shopping, or e‐mail? (3) Choose Your CONCOL competitor/collaborator in the IT Industry: No matter how powerful you are in your chosen segment of the industry, it is almost mandatory that you collaborate with some other(s) in your own industry, and/or in another of the C3 industries. Bill Gates says: “companies must be able to partner on some projects and compete vigorously in others. Few companies in the computer and communications industries are purely friends or purely foes.” (4) Choose the Technology/Territory Area for CONCOL: How will the CONCOLs be formed and dissolved‐in: (1) Technology, (2) Territory? The choice of future technology would depend on the territory: How long would it take for the particular technology to develop a mass market? In IT parlance, should we back advances in: (I) transfer of data, or (2) transformation of data? (5) Choose the Technology Transformation Profile: Visualizing technology say, five generations ahead would indeed be quite hard and hazardous. But we would choose linear extensions of performance characteristics over Quantum jumps. However, PC industry experience suggests that each successive computer generation tended to provide Quantum jumps, little of the earlier models being useable with the new generation. (6) Choose the Technology Transfer Sequence: By establishing a relationship with the techtransferor over the long‐term, and scrupulously observing the mutually‐agreed conditions of techtransfer, the transferee can steadily increase its technical competence. (7) Fiercely Focus on the UTILIZATION of the Exploding Multime‐dia Content: To make IT win in the marketplace, the mere increase in the volume of content or the mere increase in the speed of its transmission is quite inadequate. What will make the difference is the learning that is made possible by the multimedia content and communication.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Monica Perry and Charles Bodkin

Discusses the results of content analysis of the Web sites of Fortune 100 companies, carried out to identify the mix of promotional activities on their Web sites…

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5053

Abstract

Discusses the results of content analysis of the Web sites of Fortune 100 companies, carried out to identify the mix of promotional activities on their Web sites. Specifically, we performed a content analysis of Web sites utilizing categories representing a range of marketing communications, including: communicating product, pricing and dealer/retail location information, related and unrelated advertisements, sales promotion, direct marketing, basic company information and public relations. We also identified differences between and among industries based on standard industrial classification (SIC) codes. We found considerable variability in how members of the Fortune 100 used their Web sites. The Web sites ranged from very simple ones that focused on basic company information, such as company history, to quite complex Web sites that incorporated a mix of promotional elements, such as press releases, advertisements, games, free gifts and pricing information.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Joanna McDonald and Isabella Crawford

This paper aims to analyse the post‐crisis communication response of the UK oil industry both from a management and employee perspective following two major helicopter…

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2325

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the post‐crisis communication response of the UK oil industry both from a management and employee perspective following two major helicopter incidents in 2009. The purpose of this paper is to develop further understanding of the merits of a cross‐industry post‐crisis communication strategy for certain crisis types.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a single case study focusing on the Helicopter Task Group (HTG). Thirteen members of the HTG were interviewed and 250 questionnaires distributed to the workforce. Results were analysed against a literature review of current post‐crisis communication theory.

Findings

The study demonstrates that where a crisis is deemed to genuinely cross company boundaries, an inter‐organisational approach to post‐crisis communications is of mutual benefit to all stakeholders, providing certain conditions for dialogue are met.

Research limitations/implications

This paper only focuses on one crisis event. Further research is required with other inter‐organisational groups formed to lead a cross‐industry response to a crisis.

Practical implications

This case study provides a model for cross‐industry pre‐crisis planning and post‐crisis renewal strategy where the aim is not to attribute blame, but to respond to a wider community of concerns and issues that are deemed to cross company and institutional boundaries.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that the process of rebuilding stakeholder relationships and renewal is possible prior to any formal attribution of blame or apology.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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