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1 – 10 of over 182000
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Kuan-Yu Lin

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research model examining users’ perceived needs-technology fit of mobile communication software through motivational needs and…

1273

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research model examining users’ perceived needs-technology fit of mobile communication software through motivational needs and technological characteristics. The study investigated the effects of perceived needs-technology fit on user satisfaction and intention to continue using mobile communication software.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a research model based on task-technology fit theory and uses and gratification theory, incorporating key determinants of users’ continuance intention toward mobile communication software. An online survey instrument was developed to collect data, and 403 questionnaires were used to test the relationships in the proposed model.

Findings

The causal model was validated using AMOS 21.0, and all nine study hypotheses were supported. The results indicated that users’ perceived needs-technology fit and satisfaction were crucial antecedents of their intention to continue using mobile communication software and that they mediated the influence of users’ needs as well as technological characteristics.

Practical implications

Mobile communication software practitioners should focus on enhancing users’ perceived needs-technology fit through motivational needs (utilitarian, hedonic, and social needs) and technological characteristics (mobile convenience, service compatibility, and user control) to further boost user satisfaction and intention to continue using mobile communication software services.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a theoretical understanding of factors explaining users’ continuance intention toward mobile communication software.

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Yeunjae Lee, Weiting Tao, Jo-Yun Queenie Li and Ruoyu Sun

This study aims to examine the effects of diversity-oriented leadership and strategic internal communication on employees’ knowledge-sharing behavior during a crisis…

4185

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of diversity-oriented leadership and strategic internal communication on employees’ knowledge-sharing behavior during a crisis situation, coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in particular. Integrating knowledge sharing research with internal crisis communication literature as well as self-determination theory, the mediating roles of employees’ intrinsic needs satisfaction are also identified.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with 490 full-time employees in the USA across industry sectors during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Findings

Results suggest that diversity-oriented leadership contributes to transparent internal communication during a crisis and increases employees’ satisfaction of autonomy, competence and relatedness needs. Transparent internal communication also increases employees’ intrinsic needs satisfaction, which in turn fosters their job engagement and knowledge-sharing behavior during the crisis.

Originality/value

This study is one of the earliest studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of diversity-oriented leadership and strategic internal crisis communication in enhancing employees’ knowledge-sharing behavior, especially in the context of COVID-19.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Berhanu Kassayie

This article reports the outcomes of a study on communication support, commissioned to develop a borough‐wide strategy in 2003 by the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.The…

Abstract

This article reports the outcomes of a study on communication support, commissioned to develop a borough‐wide strategy in 2003 by the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.The research stems from a recognition of communication as a key to successful delivery of public services and enhancement of a multicultural community.The focus is on ‘communication’ (rather than ‘language’), since it captures issues beyond the exchange of information through words: interpersonal interactions and relationships, techniques and modes of organising information exchange. Language is a key component within the broad ambit of communication mechanism and skills. Hence interpretation and translation are perceived as models of communications support alongside advocacy, integrated team, multilingual professional team, family/friends and minors, supported language, symbols and signs, and Plain English.While engaging in the debate and highlighting some of the broader issues concerning communication support services, the focus is on the following main issues:• policy frameworks and guiding principles in communication support• methods and techniques for needs assessment, monitoring and evaluation of communication support• communication support provision in Tower Hamlets including quantifying need, actual state of provision and users' perceptions.Probably among the first of its kind, the strategy draws on existing knowledge and good practice to develop a common framework for public services in Tower Hamlets. It is believed that it will serve a pioneering role in co‐ordinated existing and developing coherent approaches to communication support.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2013

Megan M. Bresnahan and Andrew M. Johnson

This study aims to develop a systematic approach for assessing local training needs in order to reskill liaison librarians for new roles in scholarly communication and…

2178

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a systematic approach for assessing local training needs in order to reskill liaison librarians for new roles in scholarly communication and research data management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study followed a training needs assessment approach to develop a survey instrument that was administered electronically to liaison librarians. Survey data were analysed to create an overall prioritization score used to rank local training topics in terms of need. Additional data will inform the design, including formats, of a training agenda to meet these needs.

Findings

Survey results indicated that training for research data topics should be prioritized and addressed using hands‐on methods that would allow liaison librarians to develop tangible skills directly applicable to individual outreach activities.

Research limitations/implications

Training priorities often involve factors beyond the scope of this training needs assessment methodology. This methodology also presupposes a list of potential training topics. All training efforts resulting from this study will be assessed in order to determine the effectiveness of the initial interventions and inform the next steps in this iterative training agenda.

Practical implications

Involving potential trainees in the prioritization and development of a training agenda provides valuable information and may lead to increased receptivity to training.

Originality/value

This study provides a model for academic libraries to use to assess training needs in order to reskill current staff to adapt to a rapidly changing research and scholarly communication landscape.

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Asif Qumer Gill and Deborah Bunker

In distributed adaptive development environments (DADE), a primary concern is that of human communication and knowledge sharing among developers. Developers' task

Abstract

Purpose

In distributed adaptive development environments (DADE), a primary concern is that of human communication and knowledge sharing among developers. Developers' task performance will be enhanced when their task needs are aligned with the communication media or technology capabilities of the development environment. What are actual communication needs of developers; and how do we enable developers to self‐assess and select appropriate communication technology for their tasks in the DADE. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and present research based on the developers' needs for communication technologies in the context of DADE.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied an exploratory qualitative research method to investigate, analyze and integrate survey information sourced from 40 developers, to identify their communication technology needs and, based on this information, the authors then set up a practical tool – communication technologies assessment tool (CTAT) to assist developers in the self‐assessment and selection of appropriate communication technologies for their DADE; and also to share this assessment knowledge with other developers or teams located in various DADEs.

Findings

The results of this research suggest that an effective CTAT should be an integral part of the DADE; and a DADE should have a “single source of information” in order to avoid possible communication inconsistencies and ambiguities.

Originality/value

The study results and the resultant CTAT may help developers to make informed choices about the assessment and selection of appropriate communication tools but it may also help communication tools and technology service providers to develop and improve their communication tools based on the identified developers' communication needs.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Susan Miles, Erkka Valovirta and Lynn Frewer

The purpose of this paper is to elicit information about the specific information needs of different stakeholders and end‐users. An essential part of food allergy…

1290

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elicit information about the specific information needs of different stakeholders and end‐users. An essential part of food allergy prevention includes the development of effective communication strategies to all stakeholders and end‐users of this information, including allergic consumers, their carers, health professionals, public authorities (regulators and compliance authorities) retailers, manufacturers, caterers, and the general public.

Design/methodology/approach

A stakeholder consultation was conducted to solicit the views of different stakeholders regarding what information they required.

Findings

The results of the stakeholder analysis indicated that some information needs were common across all stakeholders and end‐users. An example is the need for information about the causes and symptomology of food allergy. Some specific information needs for different stakeholders were also identified. The industrial sector requires more information about clear guidelines for labelling practices, whereas allergic consumers and health professionals require more information about symptomology, treatment and prevention. Regulators need information from risk assessors regarding issues key to the implementation of an effective regulatory framework, at a more detailed level of technicality than that required by other stakeholders (for example, consumers).

Originality/value

Targeted information strategies may be the most resource‐efficient way to effectively communicate to different stakeholders about food allergy. However, information channels best suited to specific stakeholder needs remain to be investigated and exploited.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Jill Bradshaw

There are many definitions of profound and multiple learning disabilities. Most definitions include having a high degree of learning disability in conjunction with at…

581

Abstract

There are many definitions of profound and multiple learning disabilities. Most definitions include having a high degree of learning disability in conjunction with at least one other severe impairment, such as visual, auditory or physical impairments (Male, 1996; Ware, 1996; Lacey, 1998). Bunning (1997) adds that people with such disabilities are very reliant on others for support, including support in taking part in communicative events. Establishing reliable and consistent methods of communication may be exceptionally difficult (Florian et al, 2000). However, it is important to consider the individuality and extreme diversity of this population (Detheridge, 1997; Hogg, 1998), which includes variability in communication strengths and needs (Granlund & Olsson, 1999; McLean et al, 1996). Communication is often given little attention when services are planning ways of supporting individuals to participate, develop independence and make choices (McGill et al, 2000). While the individual's communication strengths and needs should remain central within any discussion, the significant others and the environment will also have an important influence. This article explores some of the communication issues experienced by people with profound and multiple learning disabilities and highlights the importance of the communication partnership within interventions.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Mary Power and Byron Rienstra

As monolithic corporations and public agencies seek ways of adapting to the demands of the next century many such institutions, while wishing to retain the benefits of…

2933

Abstract

As monolithic corporations and public agencies seek ways of adapting to the demands of the next century many such institutions, while wishing to retain the benefits of belonging to an identifiable corporation, are recreating themselves as conglomerates of “loosely coupled businesses”. This situation creates new challenges for corporate communications specialists and educators. Corporate communication in devolved systems must involve design of specific solutions for the knowledge management and communication needs of individual businesses based on local knowledge of the systems likely to be affected. This paper presents a case study analysis of a local government organisation undergoing change and from it derives suggestions for the implementation of a communication model involving consultation and education in devolved systems.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Hilary Johnson, Barbara Solarsh, Karen Bloomberg and Denise West

The purpose of this paper is to describe specific features of a Victorian (Australia) state-wide hub and spoke model of speech pathology provision established for adults…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe specific features of a Victorian (Australia) state-wide hub and spoke model of speech pathology provision established for adults with complex communication needs (CCN). Two case studies highlighting successful examples of services developed to enhance community inclusion will be described and the challenges discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The route to community inclusion is described through a case study illustration of one communication accessible community site and one disability service study. The disability service research involved focus groups, survey and interview data and demonstrated the efficacy and sustainability of a support worker training model.

Findings

Sustainable change in the community and in disability services can occur through partnerships, training, and long-term commitment. Support workers who can facilitate interactions for people who have cognitive and communicative disabilities are an essential component of building the capacity of communities to include people with CCN. Collaboration between community members, specialised supports and people with disabilities enhances active community participation.

Originality/value

This innovative, state-wide model has the capacity to be replicated elsewhere. On-going speech pathology services are integral to support adults with CCN providing both short-term individualised services, sustainable staff training and community engagement.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Jill Bradshaw

– The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the findings from Koski et al.'s (2014) research around training staff to communicate effectively.

181

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the findings from Koski et al.'s (2014) research around training staff to communicate effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

This commentary reflects on the needs of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). It uses the Five Good Communication Standards (Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists, 2013) as a framework for thinking about good communication.

Findings

Ongoing support is certainly important in enabling staff to develop and maintain good communication partnerships with the people they are working with. This first requires agreement from all involved regarding what good communication partnerships look like and how they can be measured.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the Five Good Communication Standards and how these might be interpreted with people with PIMD. It uses information from Goldbart and Caton's (2010) review of communication and people with the most complex needs to reflect on what is known from research and practice about each of these five standards. It concludes that more research is needed and greater implementation is needed where evidence is strong. We need to know what “good” could look like with people with PIMD so services support staff can then be facilitated to build successful communication partnerships and maintain these over time.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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