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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2005

Rolf Kenneth Rolfsen, Kenneth Kongsvold, Kari Hovin Kjølle and Ståle Karlsen

Utilization of information and communcation technologies is commonly accepted as important to value creation in the knowledge economy. Nevertheless, empirical findings…

Abstract

Utilization of information and communcation technologies is commonly accepted as important to value creation in the knowledge economy. Nevertheless, empirical findings from our business case studies often show that while sophisticated technological tools may be developed, the potentials are not realized. It is evident that technology is subject to adaptive and emergent strategies of use, diverging from the original intention. Within this space of opportunities, we elaborate the importandce of constructing strategic concepts as communication tools to support organisational implementation of technologies. We use the concept of organisational implementation as a way of taking the technology into use in order to support changes and value creation in the user organisation. In this paper we present our findings related to how use and experiences are conditioned by the users’ expectations. We have conducted a business case study in order to understand and explore how users employ and use a particular wireless technology infrastructure. On behalf of the infrastructure vendor, we have studied three different organisations that use this technology. The overall research goal of our joint research project was to find out what is good use and for whom. We find that users struggle to go beyond the expectations they had when they were conceptualising and telling us about their prarctice. We have good indications that a narrowed consciousness was also conditioning the users’ use of the technology. In this paper we draw the conclusion that technological implementations towards changing work practices and value creation must not be viewed by the company solely as a knowledge acquisition process, but as a process of knowledge creation. Organisational implementation is an ongoing process, a learning process at both the organisational and individual level. Flexible tools and technologies are constituted and shaped in interaction and communication in the workplace. Based on that knowledge, we build up an argument for an organisational implementation framework, including strategic discussions, learning spaces, and concept constructions.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

The purpose of this paper is to look at developments in the drive for open innovation initiatives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at developments in the drive for open innovation initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at the established companies which offer the service of “finding” external sources of innovative ideas, such as NineSigma and InnoCentive and also new entrants to the innovation market place, including USA National Innovation Marketplace.

Findings

As the drive for “innovation” continues, a rapidly expanding and ever more diverse group of companies and organizations are becoming increasingly “open”, as regards their source of ideas. As a result, the demand from companies looking to establish or broaden their open innovation initiatives has seen the established companies that offer the service of “finding” external sources of innovative ideas, such as NineSigma and InnoCentive, grow rapidly. It has also lead to new entrants to the innovation market place, including the USA National Innovation Marketplace, at the Planet Eureka site.

Originality/value

The paper provides a useful insight into developments in the drive for open innovation initiatives.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Aki Sugano, Mika Ohta, Tsuyoshi Oda, Kenji Miura, Shuji Goto, Masako Matsuura, Eiichi Maeda, Toshiko Ohshima, Yuji Matsumoto and Yutaka Takaoka

The authors develop a program, named eBraille, to translate Japanese text into braille and thereby generate braille documents easily. Public access to this program is…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors develop a program, named eBraille, to translate Japanese text into braille and thereby generate braille documents easily. Public access to this program is provided to anyone via the Internet. The paper aims to evaluate the translation accuracy of the eBraille program.

Design/methodology/approach

eBraille is a CGI program that is accessible via a web browser. The core of the program is a braille translating engine called the Kobe University Intelligent Braille Engine for ChaSen (KUIC). It is based on Japanese Braille Transcription Rules (Japanese Braille Committee, 2001). To evaluate the translation accuracy of eBraille, a corpus was utilized that was created from ordinary text and braille newspaper articles.

Findings

The paper finds that eBraille translation accuracy is equivalent to or better than that of other stand‐alone braille translation programs. This result suggests that the program achieved the goal of being applicable for practical use. In addition, the program is utilized to make Kobe University Hospital brochures in braille for outpatients and inpatients. The brochures are available in the hospital and are favorably accepted by the blind and the visually impaired. This result suggests that the translation program can facilitate accessibility to information for patients.

Originality/value

The braille translation program is based on a client‐server system and is architecture‐independent. Moreover, it is a free system for creating braille text files for anyone who has access to a web browser.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Lynn Westbrook

In a 31‐month period, 1,184 questions addressed to the Internet Public Library's (IPL) reference service remained unanswered on the grounds that they were “out of scope”…

Abstract

Purpose

In a 31‐month period, 1,184 questions addressed to the Internet Public Library's (IPL) reference service remained unanswered on the grounds that they were “out of scope”. This paper aims to analyze the questions as artifacts of users' expectations to better chart the distinction between user and librarian views of reference service.

Design/methodology/approach

Each question is examined to identify two user expectations, i.e. what kinds of information librarians could provide and what kinds of needs librarians could help meet. Emergent coding with a code‐recode rate of 97 per cent identifies 23 types of expected librarian assistance and 28 characteristics of expected applications of that assistance.

Findings

Users expect IPL librarians to provide personal advice, analysis, facts, procedures, instruction, technology guidance and evaluation. IPL librarians are expected to help users in making decisions, solving problems, completing processes and developing understanding.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of a single coder and the use of single institution's data set. Mapping these user expectations suggests a need for librarians to consider further development of reference service in terms of its judgment, form, and involvement parameters.

Practical implications

Reference service policies and training should be examined to enhance librarians' abilities to consider judgment, form, and involvement parameters primarily from the user's perspective.

Originality/value

This paper analyzes that which is rarely seen, i.e. e‐mail reference questions which are considered beyond the scope of service. Additionally, the IPL question pool provides a broader range of user mental models than would be found in any geographically bound institution.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

George A. Vouros

Organizations have already realized the significance of capturing, sharing and applying the collective experience and know‐how of their members. The aim is to increase…

Abstract

Organizations have already realized the significance of capturing, sharing and applying the collective experience and know‐how of their members. The aim is to increase operational efficiency, productivity, quality of services and get innovative products and solutions to their customers. However, it is well known that technological approaches for managing organizational knowledge need further development for their effective deployment in real settings. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of previous work done in information technology solutions to support knowledge management, to specify important features that an advanced knowledge management system must have in order to be successfully deployed in an organization, and identify emerging technological issues that must be researched and be developed in order the technological expectations of the knowledge management community to be fulfilled.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Amrik S. Sohal and Mohini Singh

Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMTs) present a majorchallenge for managers; that is, the successful adoption andimplementation of AMT and the translating of…

Abstract

Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMTs) present a major challenge for managers; that is, the successful adoption and implementation of AMT and the translating of technical benefits into business benefits in the marketplace. There are many factors that are critical to achieving this success. The authors discuss the key success factors and highlight some of the common problems experienced by firms during the planning and implementation of AMT.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Andrew Laing

The office as a workplace has reached a critical point in itsevolution. The requirement of the conventional office would appear to beholding back the near applications of…

Abstract

The office as a workplace has reached a critical point in its evolution. The requirement of the conventional office would appear to be holding back the near applications of IT and organisational creativity, which aim to promote a much freer and more dynamic relationship between space and time for the office workplace. Henry Ford′s mass production of the 1920s laid the foundations of the modern office as we know it, but “post‐Fordism” is challenging the rigid patterns then ordained, especially the traditional notions of work time and space. To this end not only must the office be redesigned but also the nature of work itself must be redefined.

Details

Facilities, vol. 9 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1993

Robert F. Rizzo

The health care crisis in the United States has roots that reachinto the nineteenth century. An examination of the cultural, social, andeconomic roots should warn against…

Abstract

The health care crisis in the United States has roots that reach into the nineteenth century. An examination of the cultural, social, and economic roots should warn against piecemeal and short‐range measures to correct a fragmented system which, despite all its achievements, is draining the economy while it fails to meet the needs of millions. Unlike the Western European experience, it began as a loosely organized and loosely co‐ordinated system, responding as it grew to the forces of change: research from Europe, technological advances, corporate interests, the need for a healthier labour force, and the economic stimuli of the marketplace. Throughout the centuries, the delivery of medical care was seen in the terms of the buying and selling of a commodity. Professional and corporate groups are interested in keeping it essentially as it is by emphasizing its accomplishments and predicting setbacks of all kinds if drastic change is made. Argues that if the reformers in and out of government do not recognize the roots of the problems and the pivotal points requiring radical surgery, they will be unsuccessful in bringing about a more comprehensive and efficient health care system. A final lesson of history is that health care is a much broader reality than medical care. The health of the people depends largely on the improvement of the social and natural environment.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 20 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Ariane Iljon

The European Commission's Libraries programme (as it is popularly known) is set in the context of the European Union's Research and Technological Development (RTD…

Abstract

The European Commission's Libraries programme (as it is popularly known) is set in the context of the European Union's Research and Technological Development (RTD) Framework Programmes. It has been one of the areas of general interest addressed within the specific programme ‘Telematics systems in areas of general interest’ which ran from 1991–1994. The Telematics Programme was in its turn part of the Third Framework Programme (FP3). At the time of writing (June 1995) this has now been followed by the Telematics Applications Programme of the Fourth Framework Programme, 1994–1998 (FP4). This paper looks back and takes stock of what has been the Commission's first initiative specifically in the libraries area.

Details

Program, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Ratna Achuta Paluri and Saloni Mehra

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors influencing the financial attitudes of Indian women and then classifying Indian women based on these attitudes. These…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors influencing the financial attitudes of Indian women and then classifying Indian women based on these attitudes. These clusters are then studied for their characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature reviewed led to the identification of variables influencing financial attitude of women. Nine of these variables (anxiety, interest in financial issues, intuitive decisions, precautionary saving, free spending, materialistic and fatalistic attitude, propensity to plan for long and short-term financial goals) were put through confirmatory factor analysis. These factors were then used as a basis for cluster analysis. The study was conducted in the city of Nashik, India, in 2014-2015, using convenience sampling. A self-reported questionnaire was used for the survey.

Findings

Results of the study showed that only a third of the respondents did not buy any financial products. The most preferred financial products of Indian women were fixed deposits and insurance policies. Four clusters of women were identified, based on their financial attitudes – judicious consumers, conservative consumers, acquisitive consumers, unsure consumers. An analysis of the dispersion of the clusters shows that interest in financial issues has the greatest influence in the formation of clusters followed by the propensity to plan and materialistic attitude. Fatalistic attitude had the least influence in the formation of clusters.

Research limitations/implications

The current study uses convenience sampling which is non-probability-based sampling and hence, lack generalizability of results. The sample for the current study is small, given the resource availability of the researcher and the unwillingness of women to participate in the survey.

Practical implications

The paper provides important insights for the marketers of financial services, in understanding the women consumers in the expanding Indian market.

Social implications

An understanding of the women consumers would help marketers develop products and financial literacy programs that suit the requirements of each specific group. By doing so the programs and communcation would be more effective.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the financial attitudes and behavior of Indian women and further clusters these women based on their financial attitudes.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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