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1 – 10 of over 5000
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

EunYoung Yoo‐Lee, Tae Heon Lee and LaTesha Velez

The purpose of this paper is to examine undergraduates' perception and use of two distinct library spaces – social and communal – in an academic library in order to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine undergraduates' perception and use of two distinct library spaces – social and communal – in an academic library in order to provide more customized services.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted at D.H. Hill Library at North Carolina State University, including structured questions on perceptions and use of the library, perceptions of library layout and design, and respondent demographics, as well as open questions on the advantages and disadvantages of social and communal spaces.

Findings

Undergraduates frequently use the physical library. Their usage patterns mirror common characteristics of Generation Y by going there mostly on weekday nights, with friends or in a group. Both communal and social spaces appear to be well‐used for many different activities ranging from solitary academic work to technology‐driven collaborative work and socializing. Some demographic variables, such as ethnicity and gender, are found to affect aspects of perception and use. For example, African American and Asian students tend to engage in activities that involve library technology, tools and resources, while White students simply use the spaces. Despite their excitement and appreciation of the social spaces in the library, students consider the quiet communal spaces integral to their experience of the library and stress the need of quiet space for academic work.

Originality/value

This is one of a few systematic empirical studies on end‐users' use of library space.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Vania Christy and Teck Hong Tan

The purpose of this study is to fill a knowledge gap by analyzing the motivations of tenants to co-living spaces in Klang Valley, Malaysia as the motives of co-living…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to fill a knowledge gap by analyzing the motivations of tenants to co-living spaces in Klang Valley, Malaysia as the motives of co-living spaces are related to how well that space supports their needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Tenants’ behaviors were examined using a convergent parallel mixed-method approach, which included a survey and an in-depth interview. A total of 175 respondents were interviewed using purposive sampling.

Findings

The results show that the preference for co-living attributes has changed during the pandemic. User ratings of preference for physical and leasing attributes of co-living spaces are significant in terms of co-living motivations. The findings also revealed that tenants prefer twin-sharing and master bedrooms when choosing a co-living space to stay in.

Research limitations/implications

Identifying the factors that influence such motivations is critical for housing developers and co-living service providers to pay close attention to improving tenants’ living experiences.

Originality/value

There is interest in the co-living spaces that are available for rent. However, very little research is based on an understanding of how the tenants in Klang Valley, Malaysia perceive this type of living arrangement. A better understanding and prediction of tenants’ needs and preferences may lead to a better understanding of the attributes that influence their motivations for using co-living spaces.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Zoe Chao, Steve Borrelli, Bikalpa Neupane and Joseph Fennewald

The purpose of this paper is to triangulate qualitative and quantitative data with existing data to inform on the function and user experience of a newly created the “News…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to triangulate qualitative and quantitative data with existing data to inform on the function and user experience of a newly created the “News Library,” and, further, to inform on the viability of “bring your own device spaces” (BYOD) in meeting the computing needs of Penn State University Park students through a multi-dimensional study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study leverages several methodologies for data collection, including observation, survey, flip chart prompts, interviews and focus groups.

Findings

Findings suggest that the News Library accommodates users’ social needs. However, it does not accommodate their communal needs well. The majority of students at the Penn State University Park campus, own laptops and bring them to the library when they intend to study. Personal device usage is preferable to library-provided computers per a familiarity with their personal device, access to personal files and independence of workspace.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a case study, the findings are not generalizable. This study was conducted in one library, on one campus at a 24-campus institution with over 30 libraries.

Originality/value

The mixed-methods study provides multiple views into user behaviors and expectations. The authors propose guidelines for informing the design of BYOD spaces.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Zsolt Zalka

Reports about therapeutic communities usually focus on specific therapeutic activities: the various ways of the community functioning correctively, the communal-personal…

Abstract

Purpose

Reports about therapeutic communities usually focus on specific therapeutic activities: the various ways of the community functioning correctively, the communal-personal dynamics of the community, the dramaturgically graspable problems and the operating and integrative function of the staff. There is relatively little attention paid to the features of the structure composed of the systems of norms and values of these communities. The purpose of this paper is to focus on this normative dimension of the culture of a therapeutic community.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors wish to show this focus with the developmental process of the system of values, rules and norms of the therapeutic community of Thalassa House in Budapest, thinking mainly in self-psychological and ethical paradigm.

Findings

The way of operating values, norms and rules – the systems of metanorms – creates the cognitive matrix in which members of the community are both acting and perceiving parties, simultaneously suffering and interpreting the communal occurrence of self-pathologies. It develops the cooperative potential of the community along this “ethical” dimension. In the view, the structure of rules, norms and values operated in the culture of relationships of the community, as a consciously elaborated collective agent, has a specific effect in the healing of self-pathologies.

Originality/value

In the view, the efficiency of the actuation of norms depends primarily on the emergence of metanorms, that is of the ”how” of the application of norms. The values of the metanorms can be found both in the circumstances of the birth of self-according to the attachment theory and in the world of dialogical ethics.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Yamen N. Al-Betawi, Fadia H. Al Nassar, Ahmad A. Al Husban and Safa Al Husban

This study aims to trace the transformation in the form of apartment building and the connotations it has in understanding the changes that occurred in the Jordanian…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to trace the transformation in the form of apartment building and the connotations it has in understanding the changes that occurred in the Jordanian society’s lifestyle over the past five decades.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative case study analysis has been conducted amongst 170 apartments, covering 70 design attributes related to aspects of appearance, spatial organisation, parking and access to building, outdoor space and finishing. This was followed by experts and households solicitation to help giving more confidence on the validity and reliability of findings regarding the sorts and justifications for the changes that have taken place in the form of apartments over the studied time frame.

Findings

The results reveal changes in design attributes indicating particular alterations in people’s lifestyle. New interests act in formulating recent housing design attributes. People seem to turn into a more open social life within public community but more privatised living amongst family members. People are becoming more attached to indoor modernised lifestyle, in homes and public areas where activities take place. This entails pursuing a more comfortable, facilitating and enjoyable life that presents luxury and tranquillity.

Originality/value

Understanding the relationship between transformations in the built form of apartment buildings and the associated social alterations provides useful insights towards improving housing provision to better match the ever-changing demands of people and respond to alterations in their lifestyles.

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Hani Alahmed, Wa’el Alaghbari, Rahinah Ibrahim and Azizah Salim

This paper aims to investigate the ways that could enhance residents’ social interaction in low-rise residential building neighbourhoods of Basra city in Iraq. The lack of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the ways that could enhance residents’ social interaction in low-rise residential building neighbourhoods of Basra city in Iraq. The lack of social interaction among residents of Basra city prompted the authors to frame a strategy for this case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The spatial design characteristics of low-rise residential building neighbourhoods implicated to support the residents in terms of social interactions in comparison to those exhibited by a single home and traditional neighbourhoods. The statistical data demonstrated that by using this strategy, several unique features of secured, collective, responsive and supportive spaces could enhance the residents’ social interaction.

Findings

This study found that all collective space factors have a significant influence on social interaction. “Fostering proper proximity and accessibility” factor was ranked first and the most significant factor with an influence on social interaction. Secured spaces (hierarchical spatial structure, physical security supports and construct) have a significant influence on social interaction. The most interesting finding in this study is that all factors of the supportive spaces construct have a significant influence on social interaction. Finally, this study showed that two factors of the responsive spaces construct, increasing variety and increasing legibility, have an insignificant influence on social interaction.

Originality/value

The design of low-rise residential building neighbourhoods in Basra city may be used to develop social interaction as the contributing factor for maintaining values of traditional neighbourhood communities. This study highlights certain recommendations for architects, especially urban designers, to reinforce residents’ social interaction in low-rise residential building neighbourhoods in Basra city.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Iftekhar Ahmed and Darryn McEvoy

After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built…

Abstract

Purpose

After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built from scratch on vacant land, which consisted of building new houses and provision of infrastructure and services. Some of these programmes in Sri Lanka and India were reviewed in an Australian Research Council (ARC) funded research and this paper presents and analyses some of the findings of the research. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on interviews of residents and representatives of agencies involved in planning and implementing the resettlement programmes, and on-site observations. The investigation examined critical aspects of settlement development including site planning, transport, drainage, water supply, sanitation, waste management and security.

Findings

Very little site planning guidelines were available specifically for resettlement programmes; in both the case study countries, general planning guidelines were applied. Provision and management of infrastructure and services presents great challenges in developing countries as high capital investment and good technical skills for design, implementation and maintenance are required. Some of the resettlement schemes had the advantage of being centrally located and hence had access to schools, health centres and other facilities. However, others were in isolated locations and beneficiaries faced problems in accessing basic facilities. Drainage was a problem – most schemes did not have any surface drainage plan; low areas had not been elevated, slopes not levelled, and land not compacted before construction. Electricity and water supply had been provided in all the programmes, but conditions and quality varied. In many of the schemes, sanitation presented a problem. However, in Chennai, the sewage system worked well and this was one achievement all interview respondents praised. Solid waste management and security posed additional problems.

Originality/value

In the global context of increasing frequency and intensity of disasters due to climate change, adequate planning and implementation of reconstruction and resettlement programmes has become more important than ever. In this regard, the lessons gained in this paper should be of value and can provide guidance to post-disaster resettlement programmes in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Caroline Emmer De Albuquerque Green, Anthea Tinker and Jill Manthorpe

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss evidence of good practice in respecting care home residents’ right to privacy. The right to privacy is a fundamental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss evidence of good practice in respecting care home residents’ right to privacy. The right to privacy is a fundamental human right as enshrined in international and domestic law and standards. In the context of increasing interest in using a human rights approach to social care in care homes for older people, this literature review summarises research evidence on what respecting the human right to privacy of care home residents entails in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This literature review followed a rigorous systematic approach to the scoping review, inspired by the Joanna Biggs Institute’s guidelines for conducting systematic reviews. A total of 12 articles were included in the review.

Findings

The research took a multidimensional understanding of privacy in their studies. The dimensions can be categorised as physical, inter-relational or related to personal data. The review highlights three good practice points. First, it is good privacy practice in care homes to make available single-occupancy bedrooms to residents since this offers the opportunity to personalising this physical space with furniture and web belongings, adding a sense of ownership over the space. Second, residents appreciate being able to choose when and how they spend their time in their own bedrooms. Third, it is good practice to respect residents’ private physical space and private choices, for example by knocking on doors before entering or agreeing with the resident when it is permissible to enter. The review also found that in some studies privacy considerations were relevant to communal living areas within care homes, including the use of surveillance cameras and the sharing of personal data.

Originality/value

This literature review adds to the body of academic literature on human rights and social care in practice. It also highlights areas for future research relating to the right to privacy in care homes.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Terri Peters and Anna Halleran

The COVID-19 global health crisis is undeniably a global housing crisis. Our study focuses on quality of life in urban mid- and high-rise apartment housing, the fastest…

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Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 global health crisis is undeniably a global housing crisis. Our study focuses on quality of life in urban mid- and high-rise apartment housing, the fastest growing housing types in many cities around the world. This housing typology presents unique challenges relating to connection to nature, daylight and fresh air.

Design/methodology/approach

This multi-disciplinary literature review analyzes more than 100 published papers from peer-reviewed sources from environmental psychology, building science and architecture relevant to quality of life in high-rise housing, as well as more than 40 recent newspaper and magazine articles about the possible impacts of COVID-19 on housing. We identify synergies between passive design strategies and health-promoting architecture or “restorative environmental design” principles.

Findings

Post-pandemic, health-promoting apartment housing design must prioritize (1) window placement and views that support stress recovery and restoration; (2) lighting levels based on spaces that can satisfy multiple uses and users; (3) bedrooms designed for restful sleep that contribute to circadian regulation; (4) living rooms with better indoor air quality, with a focus on natural ventilation; (5) access to nature, through the purposeful design of balconies and (6) unit sizes and layouts that enable physical distancing and prevent crowding.

Originality/value

We identify new social and environmental design priorities in the form of evidence-based design principles to inform and promote healthy and restorative living environments for residents in apartment housing.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Hui Soo Chae, Laura Costello and Gary Natriello

This chapter discusses the Learning Theater, a flexible library space that permits substantial patron involvement in designing dynamic environments to meet diverse learning goals.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter discusses the Learning Theater, a flexible library space that permits substantial patron involvement in designing dynamic environments to meet diverse learning goals.

Methodology/approach

We use a case study method to describe and discuss the Learning Theater.

Findings

We found that many challenges associated with designing and building a radically different library space to support patron learning goals can be resolved by eliciting patron input in all phases of the process.

Practical implications

We offer three lessons for other libraries intent on developing dramatically new kinds of library spaces: engage the community of users early and throughout, new spaces require robust communications to convey the possible set of uses to the community, and a flexible infrastructure and a responsive staff are key to meeting demands for unanticipated uses.

Originality/value

Our experience in developing the Learning Theater as part of the library education program suggests that libraries can share greater control of new flexible facilities and partner in the creation of intellectual properties to make best use of those facilities in more powerful ways than has typically been done in the past.

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