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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Yuan Liu, James G. Wen and Xiahai Wei

The purpose of this paper is to explain the puzzle of Chinese Great Leap Famine, which started with a good harvest in the end of 1958 and ended with lowest rural grain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the puzzle of Chinese Great Leap Famine, which started with a good harvest in the end of 1958 and ended with lowest rural grain consumption per capita in 1961, by focussing on the communal dining system characterized by compulsory collectivization of peasants’ total grain rations, and deprivation of private plots and household sideline production.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the panel data of 25 provinces from 1958 to 1962 to make the benchmark estimations by POLS and endogeneity-elimination estimations by 2SLS, employing the great advance in agricultural cooperative movement between 1954 and 1956 and the rural population density as the IVs for the radicalism of communal dining system during the Great Leap Forward. The β coefficients and Gfields decomposition are also presented to assess the relative importance of various factors on famine.

Findings

The empirical study finds that the communal dining system does play a critical role on the famine. The evidences of the β coefficients and Gfields decomposition basing on previous estimations also show that communal dining system is the most important cause on the famine.

Social implications

The lesson from communal dining system on famine provides reference for resolving the current “Three Agrarian Issues” in China. It is important to allow peasants to exit from the compulsive collective system.

Originality/value

The paper discovers the institutional root of the famine by the endogeneity-elimination estimations of IVs and the assessment of relative importance of various factors on famine by β coefficients and Gfields decomposition.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

JungYun (Christine) Hur and SooCheong (Shawn) Jang

Given the increasing importance of relationship management in service recovery encounters, this study aims to investigate the role of consumer–organization relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increasing importance of relationship management in service recovery encounters, this study aims to investigate the role of consumer–organization relationship norms (communal versus exchange) in connection with the service recovery process.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a thorough review of the previous literature, the model was developed. Using a scenario-based survey method, a total of 204 usable responses were obtained via self-administered questionnaires in the USA. Anderson and Gerbing’s two-step approach was used to assess the measurement and structural models.

Findings

The findings indicate that consumers’ recovery processes are influenced by relationship norms. For consumers in the communal relationship, perceived social recovery had a greater influence on satisfaction with the service recovery. Consumers in the exchange relationship reacted more sensitively to perceived economic recovery in terms of satisfaction with the service recovery.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of this study is restaurant consumers’ responses to service recovery in the context of an established relationship. Therefore, the results may not be generalizable for other consumers and segments.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for increasing the understanding of consumer behavior in established relationships and suggesting effective recovery strategies.

Originality/value

This study investigates the effect of different relationship norms that could explain varying consumer responses to service recovery within a high-quality relationship. It also provides directions for improving consumers’ satisfaction with service recovery. This differs from previous studies that mainly focused on relationship quality.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Abstract

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Designing Environments for People with Dementia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-974-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Judith Torrington

Two projects in the EQUAL programme explore aspects of the influence of building design on the quality of life of people with dementia. Design in Caring Environments…

Abstract

Two projects in the EQUAL programme explore aspects of the influence of building design on the quality of life of people with dementia. Design in Caring Environments (DICE) examined the quality of life of people in residential care homes in relation to building design features. INDEPENDENT (Investigating Enabling Environments for People with Dementia) is a current project with the aim of developing technologies to enhance quality of life by supporting enjoyable activities. One aspect of INDEPENDENT is an exploration of the interaction between spatial settings and meaningful activity, to highlight factors that support and enable activity and to identify barriers. Findings from both projects suggest that a more creative approach to the management of buildings would enhance the well‐being of residents; under‐use of facilities is common. Meaningful space that supports activity is therapeutic but spaces that give confused messages are common in buildings used by older people. Tools to evaluate buildings have a potential role in the long‐term management of facilities to help identify underused spaces, spatial confusion and barriers to activity. Quality of life was shown to be poorer in buildings that prioritise safety and health; buildings that support activity positively by providing good assistive devices, giving people control of their environment and affording good links with the community have a positive association with well‐being.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Bendegul Okumus, Ahmet Bulent Ozturk and Anil Bilgihan

The purpose of this research is to examine the dining out activities of Gen Y's in the United States. In particular, it focuses on dining frequency, restaurant selection…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the dining out activities of Gen Y's in the United States. In particular, it focuses on dining frequency, restaurant selection, restaurant segments and demographic features of Gen Yers.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data for this study were collected from 631 Gen Y's living in the United States.

Findings

The research findings reveal a nascent exploration of eating out preferences of the Gen Y population in an industrialized country in the food service context.

Research limitations/implications

Generation Y is a lucrative and growing customer group for the US foodservice industry. They dine out more frequently than the rest of the population and their dining out preferences are different from other cohorts.

Originality/value

This study offers some practical implications on Gen Y's dining out behavior for food service industry and restaurateurs.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Andrea Kenkmann and Lee Hooper

This study aims to explore the experiences of residents and staff with new restaurant‐style meal provision in four residential care homes in Norfolk, England.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the experiences of residents and staff with new restaurant‐style meal provision in four residential care homes in Norfolk, England.

Design/methodology/approach

Meal and drink provision were observed over a full day in each home and unstructured individual interviews with 16 residents and 32 staff recorded and transcribed. Content analysis was used to discover and explore main themes.

Findings

Although older care home residents enjoyed the restaurant experience, they valued stable table companions more highly than flexibility. Residents appreciated attractive surroundings, good food and their ability to make choices, but in some circumstances and for frailer residents, choice was more limited with care staff making some decisions. While the central restaurant was valued for the main meal some residents indicated they preferred smaller “family‐type” dining for other meals. Care staff sometimes found the negotiation of their waitressing and caring roles difficult. Available space and the dining‐room's location also contributed to the comparative success of the restaurant‐style provision.

Research limitations/implications

Residents valued the restaurant experience with attractive food, surroundings and the ethos of being served at lunch time, but other residents or the same residents at other meals, valued cosier stable family‐type dining more highly. Staff were also torn between service roles implied by restaurant settings and supporting residents to remain independent in the domestic model.

Practical implications

When planning new eating facilities thought needs to be given to ensuring both restaurant and family‐type food provision are available, and staff roles in these settings discussed and negotiated.

Originality/value

The research provides insights into the experiences of residents and staff of new dining facilities.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Sungjun Joe and Choongbeom Choi

This paper aims to examine the joint effect of the focal customer’s gender and fellow customer’s gender in influencing voice complaint intentions and intention to convey…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the joint effect of the focal customer’s gender and fellow customer’s gender in influencing voice complaint intentions and intention to convey negative word of mouth (NWOM).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were randomly assigned to one of the two dining conditions (same-gender fellow customer vs opposite-gender fellow customer). Their intention to voice a complaint and to spread NWOM were measured after reading a scenario describing a service failure. A 2 (focal customer gender: male vs female) × 2 (fellow customer: same gender vs opposite gender) between-subjects quasi-experimental design was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results demonstrate that female customers’ voice complaint intentions were significantly higher when a fellow customer’s gender was female rather than male. In contrast, regardless of the fellow customer’s gender, no significant differences in voice complaint intentions were found among male customers. The results further indicate that voice complaint intentions mediate the impact of a fellow customer’s gender on intention to spread NWOM among female customers. However, both female and male participants show equally high levels of voice complaint intentions in the context of fine-dining restaurant.

Practical implications

This study broadens the understanding of customer complaining behavior and also provides insights to practitioners on how to manage customers who are in same- and mixed-gender situations.

Originality/value

This research extends the literature on agency–communal theory and complaining behaviors by examining the role of a fellow customer’s gender influencing the focal customer’s intentions to voice complaints and to spread NWOM.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Julie Kellershohn, Keith Walley, Bettina West and Frank Vriesekoop

The purpose of the study was to further our understanding of in-restaurant family behaviors using an ethnographic study of families with children (at least one child from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to further our understanding of in-restaurant family behaviors using an ethnographic study of families with children (at least one child from 2 to 12 years old) dining in fast food restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes an unobtrusive, direct observational study of family fast food restaurant behaviour, including use of mobile technology, toys and indoor play area. Ordering and dining behaviours include field notes and enumeration of activity times for 300 families (450 children).

Findings

The food ordering process was rapid (<6 min), during which personal technology use was minimal, and adult/child interactions were perfunctory. Visits averaged 53 min, and only 18 min on average was spent eating. Families were observed using the fast food restaurant as a “third place” (home away from home) for many activities other than eating food. In-restaurant family behaviours included frequent use of technology (40 per cent of children/ 70 per cent of adults), use of the indoor play area (65 per cent of children/ 33 min of play) and child engagement with a toy (53 per cent of children/10 min of play).

Originality/value

Studying how time is spent in fast food restaurants expands the knowledge of current family eating behaviours and how young consumers behave in restaurants (i.e. with restaurant-provided activities, toys and indoor play spaces). Shifts in dining practices, from the intrusion of technology during the meal (technoference) to a decline in the use of restaurant-provided toys were noted. Dining visits now include many non-food activities, and the dining time in the restaurant was not a time for extensive family conversations or interactions, but rather a public home away from home.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

John O′Connor

Explores how eating‐out patterns have changed over the last 50years. From a food‐rationed wartime Britain through to the 1960s withthe advent of the Chinese restaurant…

Abstract

Explores how eating‐out patterns have changed over the last 50 years. From a food‐rationed wartime Britain through to the 1960s with the advent of the Chinese restaurant invasion, closely followed by the mushrooming Indian and Italian restaurants, highlights present‐day dining‐out habits and the demand by customers for quality and variety.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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