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Article

Lori S. Mestre

This paper aims to provide details of a collaborative campus effort that created a Media Commons at an undergraduate library at a major research university to provide…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide details of a collaborative campus effort that created a Media Commons at an undergraduate library at a major research university to provide students and faculty opportunities to experiment with emerging technologies, with expanded opportunities to learn of best practices in educational technology.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study that used a web survey, focus groups, usage statistics, and interviews to determine the needs and best practices for creating and maintaining the Media Commons.

Findings

Preliminary results indicate that this program provides value to students and faculty seeking to learn about and use multimedia for coursework and projects. It confirms the gap on campus for places students can go for loanable technology and consultation services in the production and editing of multimedia.

Research limitations/implications

Because the Media Commons just launched there has not had a programmatic evaluation yet to assess the impact of this program. However, based on initial feedback, suggestions for improvements in the program are included.

Practical implications

The rationale, process and efforts described in this paper can be replicated by other institutions that are interested in creating a Media Commons.

Originality/value

Although there are many articles written about Learning Commons and Information Commons, there is not much available that documents the efforts of creating a Media Commons at a library and the rationale for centralizing and freely making available campus multimedia expertise and equipment.

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Article

Cindy Pierard and Sever Bordeianu

This paper aims to explore the changing role of the reference collection in learning commons at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the changing role of the reference collection in learning commons at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A 15-question survey was sent to managers at academic research libraries with membership in the ARL. Respondents were asked about their learning commons and reference collections. To increase the sample size, the researchers conducted phone interviews with a random sample of individuals from the same target population, utilizing the same questions and generated additional results.

Findings

Most respondents had or were planning learning commons for their libraries. The role of reference collections varied. Of those who had retained a print reference collection, the majority believed them to be little-used. The researchers believe this may signal an end to a formerly cherished idea: the primacy of the reference collection within a library learning space.

Research limitations/implications

This study involved a random sample of public service managers at North American ARL academic libraries. While the sample is believed to be representative of the broader population, findings may not be generalizable to all ARL libraries or to other academic libraries.

Originality/value

Many papers have been written about information or learning commons spaces and their distinctive elements. Others have discussed the changing role of reference collections. This paper is unique in examining the changing role of the reference collection within learning commons spaces.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article

Michael J. Whitchurch, C. Jeffrey Belliston and William Baer

The purpose of this paper is to show that the idea and implementation of information commons' is becoming more prevalent in the academic library community. Many of these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that the idea and implementation of information commons' is becoming more prevalent in the academic library community. Many of these have been implemented in what were once General Reference areas of libraries. This paper discusses the process and experience of the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University, including concept development, acceptance and implementation. In addition, the first 18 months of operation and our visions for the future of our implementation are contained herein. One of the major themes of the paper is that change in an information commons is inevitable.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a case study of the information commons implementation done at Brigham Young University.

Findings

The paper shows the implementation of the information commons at Brigham Young University has been very successful and it will continue to adapt as higher education practice at the University continues to change.

Practical implications

This paper shows that the jury is still out as concerns “best practices” in information commons' design, Brigham Young University's experience constitutes a case study, which may very well emerge as an example of “best practice.”

Originality/value

Shows that the experience at Brigham Young University will help other academic institutions as they contemplate implementing an information commons or changing a current implementation.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part

Michael D. Hausfeld, Gordon C. Rausser, Gareth J. Macartney, Michael P. Lehmann and Sathya S. Gosselin

In class action antitrust litigation, the standards for acceptable economic analysis at class certification have continued to evolve. The most recent event in this…

Abstract

In class action antitrust litigation, the standards for acceptable economic analysis at class certification have continued to evolve. The most recent event in this evolution is the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Comcast Corp. v. Behrend, 133 S. Ct. 1435 (2013). The evolution of pre-Comcast law on this topic is presented, the Comcast decision is thoroughly assessed, as are the standards for developing reliable economic analysis. This article explains how economic evidence of both antitrust liability and damages ought to be developed in light of the teachings of Comcast, and how liability evidence can be used by economists to support a finding of common impact for certification purposes. In addition, the article addresses how statistical techniques such as averaging, price-dispersion analysis, and multiple regressions have and should be employed to establish common proof of damages.

Details

The Law and Economics of Class Actions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-951-5

Keywords

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Article

Regina Lee Roberts

Libraries are exploring the meaning of the “information commons” and have responded to the technological needs of the diversity of digital access trends. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Libraries are exploring the meaning of the “information commons” and have responded to the technological needs of the diversity of digital access trends. The purpose of this conceptual article is to explore the possibilities of the next step of developing dynamic “learning commons” using examples of projects and ideas presented by librarians in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

The “learning commons” model has the potential to be a laboratory for students, librarians and faculty. It is a collaboration space and requires partnerships and cooperation across disciplines. Ideas about user behavior and types of projects to be explored are included.

Findings

Funding for learning commons is linked to measured outcomes. The role of the librarian changes to include advocacy and project planning.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates that the change in library service via the learning commons concept requires planning, interdisciplinary collaboration and a certain amount of risk taking.

Originality/value

This paper is useful for librarians who are designing and/or implementing “learning commons” spaces and concepts into their libraries and library services.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article

András Bozány

Although heritage sites are numerous, facility management (FM) is maybe the most important process in heritage site management systems. The similarities and differences of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although heritage sites are numerous, facility management (FM) is maybe the most important process in heritage site management systems. The similarities and differences of the sites should be considered before implementing common FM information systems that support more heritage sites with various area types. The presented classifications are collected and made primarily to support this process. Specialties of heritage sites were also observed from FM point of view. The paper attempts to identify a few groups that can be used well for FM system installations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper observes the sites from several points of view. The sites are classified by heritage types, by facility planning point of view, by fragmentation and the rate of built‐in area, by human influence, by application. It offers three methods for area classification, later the computerized supporting systems are observed.

Findings

On most heritage sites FM is probably the most important management process. These cultural and natural sites are handled usually by governmental authorities and/or such organizations that can serve more sites permanently.

Research limitations/implications

Since, the heritage sites are various, there might be several exceptional cases that are not collected in this paper.

Practical implications

The paper offers guidelines and ideas to enhance the FM system implementation on different types of heritage sites. Using these groupings, several problems can be identified early in the planning phase of such information systems.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to present the diversity of the objects on the heritage sites, trying to categorize them for FM purposes from more viewpoints. Most of these sites are currently not applied with efficient FM support.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Platform Economics: Rhetoric and Reality in the ‘Sharing Economy’
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-809-5

Abstract

Details

Proleptic Leadership on the Commons: Ushering in a New Global Order
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-799-2

Content available
Article

Erin Lynn Wilkus, Gian Nicola Francesconi and Matthias Jäger

This impact assessment provides empirical evidence from household producer surveys to test the assumptions surrounding the contribution of participatory varietal selection…

Abstract

Purpose

This impact assessment provides empirical evidence from household producer surveys to test the assumptions surrounding the contribution of participatory varietal selection (PVS) activities on seed sector development. The purpose of this paper is to focus on household access and adoption of common bean varieties from seed provision services and local markets to determine if, and under what social conditions, PVS activities stimulated seed uptake and market participation.

Design/methodology/approach

The propensity score matching technique and simple regression analysis were used to estimate the impact and compare household performance across three farmer groups located in Hoima, Uganda.

Findings

PVS increased access to and adoption of improved varieties and supported additional intermediate development outcomes when farmer group characteristics were aligned with PVS efforts. Specifically, PVS was more likely to stimulate market purchases of newly introduced varieties in the farmer group located closest to markets. The project did not however, improve all the development objectives that were evaluated. PVS most critically, did not increase the probability that households received the specific varieties they desired.

Research limitations/implications

This study found that PVS can support the key pillars of seed sector development. In addition to increasing household access to new varieties, free seed dissemination promoted market participation and stimulated local seed market development.

Originality/value

This study addressed the need to consider intermediate development outcomes in impact assessments of development interventions. The findings clarified the contribution of PVS in the context of broader development goals and identified farmer group dynamics associated with enhanced impacts among rural producers in Uganda.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article

Maryna Tverdostup and Tiiu Paas

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the possible reasons behind gender pay disparities, focussing on the unique features of male and female human capital and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the possible reasons behind gender pay disparities, focussing on the unique features of male and female human capital and their wage returns. Despite increasing convergence of male and female human capital attainments, substantial differences remain. Extraction of human capital components non-overlapping across genders provides more profound explanation of the unexplained wage gap of men and women.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting with the non-parametric matching-based decomposition technique, the authors extend the pay gap estimation framework and focus on males and females having no counterpart in a set of characteristics within the opposite gender. The authors identify gender-unique human capital in terms of differences in distribution of individual characteristics across men and women and gender-specific combination of human capital characteristics. Wage returns to gender-specific profiles are evaluated applying wage regression on both full distribution of earnings and wage quantiles. The research relies on the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) database for Estonia, which incorporates both formal education and cognitive skill records.

Findings

The study identifies sets of characteristics and competencies exclusive for both genders, proving that male and female profiles cannot be directly compared. The results suggest that men possess high individual and combined abilities in numeracy and problem solving in technology-rich environment, not always reached by females. This potentiates men’s higher earnings in spite of their generally lower formal educational attainments. Wage gap analysis over the full distribution of earnings shows even larger “glass ceiling” effect for females, possessing woman-specific human capital.

Originality/value

The authors raise a research from a novel perspective towards a role of human capital in gender wage inequality. Instead of usual reference to observable gaps in male and female characteristics, the authors identify the gender-specific human capital profiles, to a large extent non-reached by the opposite gender. Analysed associations between gender-specific characteristics and earnings provide an insight to possible effects of gender-unique human capital on a male-female wage disparity.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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