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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Collins Ameyaw, Blondel Akun Abaitey, Sarfo Mensah and Emmanuel Manu

The purpose of this study was to determine the transaction cost (TC) contractors incur when tendering for a project as well as establish a correlation between the TC of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the transaction cost (TC) contractors incur when tendering for a project as well as establish a correlation between the TC of tender and tender amount of projects procured through the national competitive bidding procurement method.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws extensively documentary analysis, observation and interviews to collect cost data on 14 different tenders submitted by a D1/K1 contractor. Using TC theory, the data are analyzed and the actual cost is determined. Further, Spearman rank correlation is employed to establish a relationship between tender price (TP) and the cost of tender by the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences.

Findings

The research developed a tender preparation conceptual framework highlighting the components of TC in competitive tendering in Ghana and also revealed that, apart from the emotional and psychological costs, contractors in Ghana incur approximately Gh₵ 4,625 (US$ 925)–Gh₵ 2,520 (US$ 504) to prepare and submit a competitive tender. In relation to the tender figure, the TC of tender in Ghana ranges from 0.05% to 0.65% and an average of 0.33%. Also, there is an inverse correlation between TP and the percentage cost of tender.

Research limitations/implications

The research relied on 14 competitive tenders and also limited to public sector works. Findings from the study should therefore be applied with caution.

Originality/value

This study is the only known research that has focused on assessing the TC of public sector competitive tendering from a contractor's perspective and within a developing sub-Saharan African context.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Sarfo Mensah, Collins Ameyaw, Blondel Akun Abaitey and Hayford Obeng Yeboah

Over dependence on river/sea sand as building material has impacted the environment negatively. However, laterite, which is an environment-friendly indigenous building…

Abstract

Purpose

Over dependence on river/sea sand as building material has impacted the environment negatively. However, laterite, which is an environment-friendly indigenous building material in sub-Saharan Africa, has been less exploited as a suitable alternative. This paper aims to ascertain the optimum cement–laterite mix proportion at which laterite can be stabilized for production of walling units.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental method, laterite was collected from three borrow pit sites. Sieve analysis was performed to determine the particle size distribution. Also, the degree of workability of the cement–laterite mix was ascertained using slump test. Compressive strengths were determined at cement stabilization percentages of 3%, 7% and 10% on 12 cubes of100 mm cast and cured for 14 and 28 days, respectively.

Findings

The results showed that the lateritic soil investigated, achieves its optimum strength in 28 days of curing, at a stabilization level of 10%. An average compressive strength of 2.41 N/mm2, which is 20.5% greater than the target strength, was achieved.

Practical implications

To meet the desired compressive strength of alternative walling units while achieving environmental sustainability and efficiency in production, cement stabilization of lateritic soils should become a recommended practice by built environment professionals in sub-Saharan Africa.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first research works that attempts to determine the optimum level at which the abundant sub-Saharan laterite can be chemically stabilized for the production of non-load bearing walling units. This research promotes an environment-friendly alternative building material to sea sand, river sand and off-shore sand.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Collins Ameyaw and Hans Wilhelm Alfen

The purpose of this paper is to identify the risks associated with private sector participation (PSP) in power generation (PG) projects, how they were allocated and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the risks associated with private sector participation (PSP) in power generation (PG) projects, how they were allocated and the strategies used to mitigate their likely adverse effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts case study research method and cross-case analyses to unearth the key risks and the contractual instruments used to manage them.

Findings

The paper identified 30 risk factors associated with four major private sector PG projects in Ghana. The allocation and mitigation strategies of these risks are also reported.

Originality/value

This is the first study to create a risk register of PSP PG projects. Private investors and government have been provided with a comprehensive list of risks associated with PG infrastructure. Would-be investors have also been armed with some potential risk management strategies for proper project structuring.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2020

Richard Ohene Asiedu and Collins Ameyaw

This study aimed at developing and empirically testing a system dynamics causal loop (SDCL) model for investigating factors related to the risk of cost overruns…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed at developing and empirically testing a system dynamics causal loop (SDCL) model for investigating factors related to the risk of cost overruns, associated with the performance of construction projects in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data derived from the Ghanaian construction industry (GCI), a conceptual system dynamics model was hypothesised and empirically tested.

Findings

Supported by empirical evidence, the study established that the low technical capacity of consultants is the underlying cause of cost overruns in government projects. There is a strong proof of the relationship between the results of the SDCL model and poor contract planning and supervision, change orders, competence of the project team and the lack of effective coordination amongst the contractual parties.

Practical implications

The final SDCL model has revealed key risk components that would require standard mitigation measures in order to achieve “acceptable success” in construction projects.

Originality/value

The study presents an interactive approach for construction practitioners in developing countries to prioritise the causes of cost overruns in order to initiate quick responses.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Collins Ameyaw, Theophilus Adjei-Kumi and De-Graft Owusu-Manu

The purpose of this paper is to explore the various approaches prescribed in literature in the assessment of value for money (VfM) of public–private partnership (PPP…

1278

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the various approaches prescribed in literature in the assessment of value for money (VfM) of public–private partnership (PPP) projects with the aim to develop a theoretical framework for measuring VfM in Ghana.Public–private partnership (PPP) has long been recognized as an effective way of procuring public infrastructure to deliver value for money, but the subject has received little research attention in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology comprises a multi-stage critical review of relevant literature; review of Ghana’s National Policy on PPP and review of the Public Procurement Act, 2003 (Act 663). This paper was underpinned by an interpretivist philosophy and is inductive in nature.

Findings

The approach for VfM assessment largely depends on the jurisdiction of the project. Multiple methods (qualitative and quantitative) are used along the project cycle in the bid to achieve VfM. The most common assessment approaches include public sector comparator shadow bid, lease-purchase analysis, cost benefits analysis, public interest test central guidelines and competitive bidding. The study developed a theoretical framework for assessing VfM in Ghana.

Research limitations/implications

The research was purely exploratory and non-empirical; and hence cannot be generalized in a broader context.

Practical implications

Implementation of the National PPP policy and for PPP to thrive in Ghana, a framework to guide the assessment and achievement of VfM is crucial. The steps outlined if followed would help ensure the public receives the best of all PPP deals in Ghana.

Originality/value

This paper is unique providing insights into a conceptual basis for assessing VfM and provides a basis for future empirical study.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Jeffrey Boon Hui Yap, Kai Yee Lee and Martin Skitmore

Corruption continues to be a pervasive stain on the construction industry in developing countries worldwide, jeopardising project performance and with wide-ranging…

1303

Abstract

Purpose

Corruption continues to be a pervasive stain on the construction industry in developing countries worldwide, jeopardising project performance and with wide-ranging negative implications for all facets of society. As such, this study aims to identify and analyse the causes of corruption in the construction sector of an emerging economy such as Malaysia, as it is crucial to uncover the specific facilitating factors involved to devise effective counter strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a detailed literature review, 18 causes of corruption are identified. The results of an opinion survey within the Malaysian construction industry are further reported to rank and analyse the causes. The factor analysis technique is then applied to uncover the principal factors involved.

Findings

The results indicate that all the considered causes are perceived to be significant, with the most critical causes being avarice, relationships between parties, lack of ethical standards, an intense competitive nature and the involvement of a large amount of money. A factor analysis reveals four major causal dimensions of these causes, comprising the unique nature of the construction industry and the extensive competition involved; unscrupulous leadership, culture and corruption perception; a flawed legal system and lack of accountability; and ineffective enforcement and an inefficient official bureaucracy.

Research limitations/implications

The study presents the Malaysian construction industry’s view of the causes of corruption. Therefore, the arguments made in the study are influenced by the social, economic and cultural settings of Malaysia, which may limit generalisation of the findings.

Practical implications

This paper helps stakeholders understand the root causes and underlying dimensions of corruption in the construction industry, especially in Malaysia. Recommendations for changing cultures that may be conducive to corrupt practices, and anti-corruption measures, are suggested based on the findings of the research.

Originality/value

These findings can guide practitioners and researchers in addressing the impediments that give rise to the vulnerability of the construction industry to corrupt practices and understanding the “red flags” in project delivery.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Mark Kiiza and Benon C. Basheka

Over decades, indigenous management practices and their values in Africa have changed from time to time. However, it continued to remain relevant in most business…

Abstract

Over decades, indigenous management practices and their values in Africa have changed from time to time. However, it continued to remain relevant in most business organisations in developing countries. Today in Africa and across the globe, there is a paradigm shift and stiff competition in human resource management practices as a basic element for effective and efficient business organisations’ performance. Effective human resource management practices and performance of organisations rely on the integration of indigenous management practices and sound strategies aligned to cultural values and cores business objectives. The study covers four regions of Africa as a continent. Empirical teachings of the study form a basis for active reforms and innovations, so as to revamp the use of indigenous knowledge, which was deliberately destroyed by colonial masters. Over the years, human resource management practice has evolved in favour of Western strategies and ideologies. Advocates for curriculum reforms in all African countries so as to incorporate indigenous knowledge content, since it is believed to be the future of Africa. An appropriate employees management practice in Africa is a necessary move in today’s business community as it enhances service delivery and performance. The application of indigenous management practices is believed to play a vital role and invokes effective decision-making practices in the business organisation. Therefore, the chapter traces the origin of indigenous wisdom and its fundamental structure in management practices. This chapter attempts to throw light on indigenous management practices and their values in business organisations in Africa.

Details

Indigenous Management Practices in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-849-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2013

Abstract

Details

The Development of Higher Education in Africa: Prospects and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-699-6

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Mian M. Ajmal, Mehmood Khan, Angappa Gunasekaran and Petri T. Helo

Project scope creep is a nightmare and nearly intolerable task. Most project managers struggle to curtail the expanse and degree of scope creep. This study examines…

1977

Abstract

Purpose

Project scope creep is a nightmare and nearly intolerable task. Most project managers struggle to curtail the expanse and degree of scope creep. This study examines different likely project scope creep factors associated with the construction industry projects.

Design/methodology/approach

After many brainstorming sessions with construction stakeholders, several project scope creep factors were identified. Then, a detailed survey was executed in big construction projects of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).

Findings

The results derived and validated five conspicuous factors leading to project scope creep. Respectively, the highest and the lowest impact on project scope appears to be imposed by tasks/specifications and complexity/uncertainty.

Practical implications

It offers crucial support to the project stakeholders in scrutinizing different factors that stand as hurdles to project success and allows them to seek remedies to resolve them.

Originality/value

It is among the first study in the region that identifies and validates the factors that hinder construction project success.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2022

Charles Baah, Ebenezer Afum, Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Essel Dacosta, Douglas Opoku-Agyeman and Collins Nyame

Using the institutional and natural resource-based view theories, the purpose of this study is to examine the influence of religious, cultural and mimetic orientations on…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the institutional and natural resource-based view theories, the purpose of this study is to examine the influence of religious, cultural and mimetic orientations on proactive environmental strategy, corporate environmental responsibility and traditional environmental strategy. Relying on data collected from managers of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), the study further examines how proactive environmental strategy, corporate environmental responsibility and traditional environmental strategy drive relational capital and firm performance of SMEs operating in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a survey research design, a quantitative approach and a partial least square structural equation modelling technique in making data analysis and interpretations due to its appropriateness for predictive research models.

Findings

The results suggest that mimetic orientation robustly and significantly influence the dimensions of environmental orientation. While religious orientation only had a robust and significant influence on proactive environmental strategy, cultural orientation robustly and significantly influences both proactive and traditional environmental strategies. Despite the positive and significant interactions that exist between proactive environmental strategy, corporate environmental responsibility, traditional environmental strategy, relational capital and firm performance, the findings particularly revealed that proactive and environmental strategies insignificantly correlated with relational capital contrary to past study findings.

Originality/value

The study is among the few to examine how religious, cultural and mimetic orientations interrelate with proactive and traditional environmental orientations, relational capital and firm performance in an emerging economy. Based on the findings, implications and directions for future research are discussed while also providing guidance for policymakers, regulatory bodies, scholars and practitioners.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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