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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Colleen S. Harris

The purpose of this paper is to explore the myriad non‐financial ways in which library managers can motivate employees and address performance issues, reducing attrition…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the myriad non‐financial ways in which library managers can motivate employees and address performance issues, reducing attrition and increasing productivity and satisfaction without increasing salaries.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical self‐reflection summarizing the author's experiential learning as a new assistant department head tackling a library department's productivity and cost issues with staff processing of course reserves. After an initial description of the situation, the paper explores the theories that apply to the experience, and includes analysis of the experience in light of those theories. The article includes how application by one library manager of findings from motivation, trust, and leadership theory literature was able to reduce staff attrition, increase staff satisfaction, and reduce costs.

Findings

The literature from a number of fields demonstrates that there are areas aside from financial compensation that library managers can harness to increase the motivation and satisfaction of staff members. An awareness of the factors cited in these literatures can help library leadership and managers improve unit performance. As budgets continue to shrink and open positions remain unfilled, it is imperative library managers find creative, non‐remunerative, and effective ways to address staffing needs.

Research limitations/implications

The continued economic and budget limitations facing libraries create implications for library leaders and managers in terms of replacing and rewarding staff members, and creating workflow efficiencies in necessary library services.

Practical implications

This paper brings the issue of responsible staff stewardship and practical management to the forefront in an effort to engage library leaders and managers in a discussion about engaging with other discipline literatures for suggestions on how to maintain productive, satisfied staff while faced with fewer resources for rewarding good work.

Social implications

The culture of library management practice could (and should) be affected by this issue, and the work in other disciplines may have wider application in terms of human resources management, distributions of managers' effort, and performance management issues in libraries.

Originality/value

The paper outlines one library manager's approach to an under‐performing library department, relating those approaches to factors identified in the broader literature as important to managers and leaders, and addresses the issue of how to address library service needs as budgets are stripped and staff attrition without replacement becomes regular practice.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2010

Colleen S. Harris

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of libraries using Netflix to supplement their own audiovisual collections.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of libraries using Netflix to supplement their own audiovisual collections.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the current discussion regarding breaking terms of service is presented along with several complications that arise from libraries disregarding the Netflix terms of service agreement.

Findings

The problem of providing patrons with access to materials that the library cannot afford to purchase and which cannot be acquired via interlibrary loan has no simple answer. Librarians may be in a unique position to encourage changes to terms of service that may be more friendly to lending institutions, but only if they do not squander their legitimacy by disregarding current terms.

Research limitations/implications

Most of the conversation is based on anecdote and recent practice. Very little has been written on how to fix this problem.

Practical implications

This paper brings this issue to the forefront in an effort to engage librarians in a discussion about the ethical, practical and legal implications of breaking terms of service in the pursuit of serving patrons.

Social implications

The culture of library practice could be affected by this issue, and may have wider ramifications in terms of future copyright, licensing, and terms of service agreements.

Originality/value

The paper is timely, addressing a current question and debate within their field. It proposes that librarians should find solutions only after seriously considering the legal, ethical, and economic implications of their actions.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Colleen S. Harris

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of budget cuts on libraries' ability to continue to maintain labor‐intensive IT maintenance on multiple systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of budget cuts on libraries' ability to continue to maintain labor‐intensive IT maintenance on multiple systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a discussion of the likely impact of the increasing popularity of cloud‐based and hosted information technology solutions.

Findings

Library practice, and emerging technology products targeted at library information systems, point to the fact that libraries with limited IT staff may continue to reduce their involvement in enterprise‐level IT projects and focus more on service provision and local enhancements.

Research limitations/implications

The change in IT environments towards increasingly hosted solutions creates implications for library IT departments in terms of focus and needed skill‐sets.

Practical implications

This paper brings the issue of library IT constraints to the forefront in an effort to engage librarians in a discussion about where IT influence should be directed, and awareness of some of the practical concerns about moving to hosted and cloudware solutions.

Social implications

The culture of library practice could be affected by this issue, and may have wider ramifications in terms of future library IT development and distributions of effort.

Originality/value

The paper is timely, addressing a current question and debate within the field. It proposes that librarians should explore the questions inherent in altering IT offerings in light of new vendor capabilities.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Colleen S. Harris

The purpose of this paper is to ask how the academic library may better position itself to assist with the demonstrated need for improved research ability in doctoral…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ask how the academic library may better position itself to assist with the demonstrated need for improved research ability in doctoral students. The paper examines the literature on doctoral student retention, which demonstrates problems with research self‐efficacy in students, and connects this issue to the library literature demonstrating the impact of library instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

The main approach is the review of the literatures in library science on the impact of instruction, and in the wider education literature on student retention and doctoral student attrition.

Findings

It was found that library instruction does demonstrably improve student research skills, and that doctoral students are generally underprepared to conduct dissertation level research. There is a case for partnering doctoral students with academic librarians to improve dissertation completion rates and lower attrition due to lack of research skill.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates an obvious need for focus of library instruction on graduate students, and doctoral students in particular. The paper poses a number of research agendas that can be taken up by practitioners in the field, including various models for implementing instruction for doctoral students.

Social implications

Attrition from doctoral programs has a burdensome impact on academic institutions, and has been demonstrated to have adverse social, psychological and financial impacts on the doctoral students themselves. The ability of library intervention to alleviate the problem has wide‐ranging implications.

Originality/value

The paper brings a wider literature base to bear on the practice of library instruction, and raises important questions relevant to librarians and graduate faculty about the value of the library to more advanced research students and the current focus of most library instruction programs at the undergraduate levels.

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Kaitlyn M. Eck, Colleen Delaney, Melissa D. Olfert, Rebecca L. Hagedorn, Miriam P. Leary, Madison E. Santella, Rashel L. Clark, Oluremi A. Famodu, Karla P. Shelnutt and Carol Byrd-Bredbenner

Eating away from home frequency is increasing and is linked with numerous adverse health outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of health…

Abstract

Purpose

Eating away from home frequency is increasing and is linked with numerous adverse health outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of health promotion materials for improving eating away from home behaviors by elucidating related parent and child cognitions.

Design/methodology/approach

Parents (n=37) and children (n=35; ages 6–11 years) participated in focus group discussions, based on social cognitive theory. Data were content analyzed to detect themes.

Findings

Many parents were concerned about what children ate away from home, however, others were less concerned because these occasions were infrequent. Lack of time and busy schedules were the most common barriers to eating fewer meals away from home. The greatest barrier to ensuring children ate healthfully away from home was parents were not present to monitor children’s intake. To overcome this, parents supervised what kids packed for lunch, provided caregivers instruction on foods to provide, and taught kids to make healthy choices. Kids understood that frequently eating away from home resulted in less healthful behaviors. Barriers for kids to eat healthy when away from home were tempting foods and eating in places with easy access to less healthy food. Kids reported they could take responsibility by requesting healthy foods and asking parents to help them eat healthfully away from home by providing healthy options and guidance.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to qualitatively analyze parent and child eating away from home cognitions. It provides insights for tailoring nutrition education interventions to be more responsive to these audiences’ needs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Chad R. Lochmiller and Colleen E. Chesnut

The purpose of this paper is to describe the program structure and design considerations of a 25-day, full-time apprenticeship in a university-based principal preparation program.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the program structure and design considerations of a 25-day, full-time apprenticeship in a university-based principal preparation program.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative case study design that drew upon interviews and focus groups with program participants as well as program-related documents. Qualitative data analysis was completed using ATLAS.ti.

Findings

The analysis suggests that the apprenticeship had three specific design features that were intended to support the apprentice’s development for turnaround leadership. These included locating the apprenticeship experience in a turnaround school setting; focusing the apprenticeship on district structures and procedures; and situating the apprentice’s work within the district’s approved improvement process.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited in that recurring, on-site observations of apprenticeship activities were not possible. The study has implications for principal preparation programs related to the design of fieldwork experiences, as well as for educational scholars seeking to study the impact of fieldwork on principal efficacy.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the broader discussion of effective fieldwork experiences for aspiring school leaders, particularly when specific conceptions of leadership are infused within program designs.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Erica E. Harris, Ryan D. Leece and Daniel G. Neely

We investigate the determinants and consequences of nonprofit lobbying activity by analyzing 501(c)(3) nonprofit lobbying choices as reported on the primary tax form, Form…

Abstract

We investigate the determinants and consequences of nonprofit lobbying activity by analyzing 501(c)(3) nonprofit lobbying choices as reported on the primary tax form, Form 990. Under the Internal Revenue Code (IRC), nonprofits may lose their tax exempt status if they engage in a substantial amount of lobbying. We examine lobbying choices across three dimensions: (1) the test used to determine whether lobbying activities are substantial (i.e., making an H-election) (2) whether lobbying activities are directly related to the mission of the nonprofit (i.e., program related) (3) whether an affiliate nonprofit lobbies on behalf of a nonprofit. Results indicate lobbying choices are associated with the amount of lobbying reported and the amount of contributions received. Additionally, our results provide some evidence that nonprofit lobbying choices allowed under the IRC are underutilized.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2019

Colleen Dell, Darlene Chalmers, Mark Stobbe, Betty Rohr and Alicia Husband

Prison-based animal programs are becoming increasingly common in North America. The majority focus on community and animal well-being, with less explicit therapeutic goals…

Abstract

Purpose

Prison-based animal programs are becoming increasingly common in North America. The majority focus on community and animal well-being, with less explicit therapeutic goals for human participants. The purpose of this paper is to measure the objectives of a canine animal-assisted therapy (AAT) program in a Canadian psychiatric prison and examine whether the program supports inmates’ correctional plans.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified instrumental case study design was applied with three inmates over a 24-AAT-session program. Quantitative and qualitative AAT session data were collected and mid- and end-of-program interviews were held with the inmates, their mental health clinicians and the therapy dog handlers.

Findings

Inmates connected with the therapy dogs through the animals’ perceived offering of love and support. This development of a human–animal bond supported inmates’ correctional plans, which are largely situated within a cognitive-behavioral skill development framework. Specifically, inmates’ connections with the therapy dogs increased recognition of their personal feelings and emotions and positively impacted their conduct.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that prison-based AAT programs emphasizing inmate mental well-being, alongside that of animal and community well-being generally, merit further exploration. It would be worthwhile to assess this AAT program with a larger and more diverse sample of inmates and in a different institutional context and also to conduct a post-intervention follow-up.

Originality/value

This is the first study of a prison-based AAT program in a Canadian psychiatric correctional facility.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Brenda Jones Harden, Brandee Feola, Colleen Morrison, Shelby Brown, Laura Jimenez Parra and Andrea Buhler Wassman

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to…

Abstract

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to their exposure to multiple poverty-related risks, African American children may be more susceptible to exposure to toxic stress. Toxic stress affects young children’s brain and neurophysiologic functioning, which leads to a wide range of deleterious health, developmental, and mental health outcomes. Given the benefits of early care and education (ECE) for African American young children, ECE may represent a compensating experience for this group of children, and promote their positive development.

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

Keywords

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