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Brenda Jones Harden, Brandee Feola, Colleen Morrison, Shelby Brown, Laura Jimenez Parra and Andrea Buhler Wassman

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to…

Abstract

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to their exposure to multiple poverty-related risks, African American children may be more susceptible to exposure to toxic stress. Toxic stress affects young children’s brain and neurophysiologic functioning, which leads to a wide range of deleterious health, developmental, and mental health outcomes. Given the benefits of early care and education (ECE) for African American young children, ECE may represent a compensating experience for this group of children, and promote their positive development.

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

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Abstract

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

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Abstract

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

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Article

Colleen Dell, Darlene Chalmers, Mark Stobbe, Betty Rohr and Alicia Husband

Prison-based animal programs are becoming increasingly common in North America. The majority focus on community and animal well-being, with less explicit therapeutic goals…

Abstract

Purpose

Prison-based animal programs are becoming increasingly common in North America. The majority focus on community and animal well-being, with less explicit therapeutic goals for human participants. The purpose of this paper is to measure the objectives of a canine animal-assisted therapy (AAT) program in a Canadian psychiatric prison and examine whether the program supports inmates’ correctional plans.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified instrumental case study design was applied with three inmates over a 24-AAT-session program. Quantitative and qualitative AAT session data were collected and mid- and end-of-program interviews were held with the inmates, their mental health clinicians and the therapy dog handlers.

Findings

Inmates connected with the therapy dogs through the animals’ perceived offering of love and support. This development of a human–animal bond supported inmates’ correctional plans, which are largely situated within a cognitive-behavioral skill development framework. Specifically, inmates’ connections with the therapy dogs increased recognition of their personal feelings and emotions and positively impacted their conduct.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that prison-based AAT programs emphasizing inmate mental well-being, alongside that of animal and community well-being generally, merit further exploration. It would be worthwhile to assess this AAT program with a larger and more diverse sample of inmates and in a different institutional context and also to conduct a post-intervention follow-up.

Originality/value

This is the first study of a prison-based AAT program in a Canadian psychiatric correctional facility.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article

Jimmy Byrd and Colleen Eddy

The purpose of this study was to review research published by Journal of Educational Administration (JEA) and the Educational Administration Quarterly (EAQ) over the past…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to review research published by Journal of Educational Administration (JEA) and the Educational Administration Quarterly (EAQ) over the past ten years to examine the type of research reported and to determine if confidence intervals and effect sizes were being reported as recommended by the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined 95 volumes of the identified journals over the most recent ten‐year timeframe. Each empirical study was coded for decisions made during the analysis and information reported. A total of 473 journal articles were examined and included in the study. Descriptive measures were employed to provide insight into the use and frequency of reported confidence intervals, effect sizes, and the type of research that is currently published.

Findings

The results indicated that effect size was being reported in the majority of quantitative studies with limited interpretation. In contrast, no quantitative study examined over the ten‐year timeframe reported confidence intervals despite the recommendations of the APA Task Force on Statistical Inference and guidelines outlined in the most recent edition of the APA Publication Manual. Recommendations for statistical reform in reporting quantitative results in the JEA and EAQ are presented and future direction is discussed.

Originality/value

This paper is valuable for researchers wanting to place their findings in the proper context. By not reporting confidence intervals and effect size information, one does not know the true meaning of their results.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

Heather Morrison

Focuses on an initiative of the Association of Research Library’s Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition in giving leadership for providing open access to…

Abstract

Focuses on an initiative of the Association of Research Library’s Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition in giving leadership for providing open access to scholarly information, determining this as the most effective means of advancing scholarly research. Addresses some of the reasons for opening up access to library literature, issues and challenges, and gives some examples of library associations that are already providing open access to their publications.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article

Sharon Dotger and Deborah Walsh

– The purpose of this paper is to report on elementary students’ observational drawings, which were produced from two science lesson study cycles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on elementary students’ observational drawings, which were produced from two science lesson study cycles.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collaboratively studied student work from two science research lessons. The authors evaluated 50 students’ science notebook entries, paying specific attention to their observational sketches. The authors wanted to understand how fourth grade students approach observational drawing in science class to better inform science and art pedagogy.

Findings

Students represented their observations in a variety of ways. The structure of the lessons might have influenced students’ drawings, as did students’ orientation when constructing their representations.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited in that it only analyzes observational drawing from two research lessons.

Practical implications

Through cross-disciplinary collaboration between a science educator and an art teacher, the authors developed shared ideas that were applicable in both spaces. In the near term, the authors have each changed the instructional practices to include more observational drawing.

Social implications

This paper could impact public attitudes about the inclusion of science and art in the elementary curriculum. The authors would expect that through articulating the purpose of observational drawing for the artist and the scientist, the public would be more supportive of teaching these skills in school.

Originality/value

This paper documents teacher learning across two content areas which students have limited access to in the USA during elementary school. It explains how science and art share objectives and can thus advocate for each other’s inclusion in the school day.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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