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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Femi Emmanuel Ayo, Olusegun Folorunso and Sakinat Oluwabukonla Folorunso

Over the past decade, the cost of product development has increased drastically, and this is due to the inability of most enterprises to locate suitable and optimal…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past decade, the cost of product development has increased drastically, and this is due to the inability of most enterprises to locate suitable and optimal collaborators for knowledge sharing. Nevertheless, knowledge sharing is a mechanism that helps people find the best collaborators with relevant knowledge. Hence, a new approach for locating optimal collaborators with relevant knowledge is needed, which could help enterprise in reducing cost and time in a knowledge-sharing environment. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

One unique challenge in the domain of knowledge sharing is that collaborators do not possess the same number of events resident in the knowledge available for sharing. In this paper, the authors present a new approach for locating optimal collaborators in knowledge-sharing environment using the combinatorial algorithm (CA-KSE).

Findings

The proposed pattern-matching approach implemented in Java is considered efficient for solving the issue peculiar to collaboration in knowledge-sharing domain. The authors benchmarked the proposed approach with its semi-global pairwise alignment and global alignment counterparts through scores comparison and the receiver operating characteristic curve. The results obtained from the comparisons showed that CA-KSE is a perfect test having an area under curve of 0.9659, compared to the other approaches.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has proposed an efficient algorithm, which is considered better than related methods, for matching several collaborators (more than two) in KS environment. The method could be deployed in medical field for gene analysis, software organizations for distributed development and academics for knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

One sign of strength of this approach, compared to most sequence alignment approaches that can only match two collaborators at a time, is that it can match several collaborators at a faster rate.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Pablo Cardona

Looks at leadership from a relational perspective. This perspective focuses on the relationship that is created between a leader and a collaborator. We call this…

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15875

Abstract

Looks at leadership from a relational perspective. This perspective focuses on the relationship that is created between a leader and a collaborator. We call this relationship a partnership, and distinguish three types of partnerships: transactional, transformational, and transcendental. The type of partnership that the leader is able to create, determines the quality of the collaborator’s following behaviors, and demonstrates sets of values and behaviors that the leader shows in action. Transcendental leadership adds to the transformational one a service orientation, which solves the possible manipulative side of tranformational leaders.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Martha Ríos Manríquez

Abstract

Details

Empowerment, Transparency, Technological Readiness and their Influence on Financial Performance, from a Latin American Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-382-7

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2017

Marco Leite, António J. Baptista and António M.R. Ribeiro

The purpose of this paper is to highlight possible hidden risks when allocating multi-skilled human resources to teams working in a multi-project environment. Are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight possible hidden risks when allocating multi-skilled human resources to teams working in a multi-project environment. Are allocation strategies maximizing the use of skills for each project, the only way to improve the chances of all projects being successful? What are the risks in this strategy? What are the available alternatives?

Design/methodology/approach

Simulation was used for different allocation strategies to evaluate, using two different metrics, the staffing of human resources in different projects. Three categories of companies were studied, and for each typology, virtual companies were created and several scenarios of collaborators, projects and tasks were simulated to evaluate the staffing process.

Findings

It is shown that for different simulations, different allocation strategies and metrics are possible for evaluation and that there is no golden rule of staffing in organizations with multiple projects and with multiple skills collaborators. The staffing is very much dependent on the context of the company.

Practical implications

The numerical method provides general managers with a useful tool to enable a better distribution of staff collaborators in teams handling multiple projects that require multi-skilled human resources. This method can also be used to evaluate training needs and hiring strategies, as it presents an overview of all human resources skills and motivations.

Originality/value

For academics, the methodology developed enables the study of characteristics of human resources, skills and motivations, which are interesting for team formation. To practitioners, the numerical method is a practical tool for staffing in multiple skills and multiple projects. This tool can also diagnose each company situation regarding current collaborators’ skills and motivations, serving as a tool for training and for hiring.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Ofer Bergman, Steve Whittaker and Yaron Frishman

State-of-the-art cloud applications are problematic for collaborative document management; their current design does not encourage active personal folder categorization…

Abstract

Purpose

State-of-the-art cloud applications are problematic for collaborative document management; their current design does not encourage active personal folder categorization. Cloud applications such as Google Drive and Microsoft’s OneDrive store documents automatically, so at no point are users directed to categorize them by placing them in folders. To encourage active categorization and promote effective retrieval of cloud documents, the authors designed an add-on “nudge” called Personal Organizer which prompts Google Drive users to categorize by storing cloud documents in personal folders. The add-on prompt is triggered when users attempt to close uncategorized or unnamed documents. The purpose of this paper is to test whether using the Personal Organizer add-on leads participants to actively store their documents in folders that they personally created, and whether this promotes more successful and efficient retrieval.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the add-on, the authors conducted a pretest-manipulation-post-test intervention study with 34 participants lasting over three months. In both tests, participants were asked to retrieve personal documents taken from their own “Recents” list to improve ecological validity.

Findings

Using our add-on doubled the percentage of documents that were actively stored in folders. Additionally, using personally created folders substantially improved retrieval success while decreasing retrieval time.

Originality/value

Implementing our findings can improve document storage and retrieval for millions of users of collaborative cloud storage. The authors discuss broader theoretical implications concerning the role of active organization for retrieval in collaborative repositories, as well as design implications.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Chiung-Lin Liu and Ming-Yu Lee

Supply chain resilience (SCR) is essential to the success of firms. However, very few studies have focused on the relationships between different types of integration, SCR…

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2608

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain resilience (SCR) is essential to the success of firms. However, very few studies have focused on the relationships between different types of integration, SCR and service performance from the perspective of third-party logistics providers (3PLs). The purpose of this paper is to develop and assesses a conceptual model for these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 161 3PLs in Taiwan were surveyed and their responses were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM/PLS).

Findings

The responses of respondents demonstrated that, of the three types of integration (internal integration, customer integration and logistics collaborator integration) used by 3PLs, internal integration had the greatest effect on SCR. Customer integration was found to have three fully mediating effects on the relationships between internal integration and service performance, between logistics collaborator integration and SCR, and between logistics collaborator integration and service performance.

Originality/value

This study provides useful information on how different types of integration manifest in the SCR and service performance of 3PLs.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Mosad Amin Zineldin

Attempts to address how organizations are responding to the growing complexities of global business, technology, and virtual organizations. Argues that organizations can…

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3150

Abstract

Attempts to address how organizations are responding to the growing complexities of global business, technology, and virtual organizations. Argues that organizations can co‐operate and compete at the same time in order to be more effective in the marketplace utilizing a relationship perspective. This is why we have integrated the concepts cooperation and effectiveness, to create the new “co‐opetive” terminology. An ecological collaborative value system (CVS) has been developed. The behaviour of the system is affected by the condition of its components, and the system components are affected by environmental conditions. CVS suggests that customers, suppliers, distributors, competitors, and other organizations are equal partners in the system. Argues that it is imperative for a successful alliance and relationship between the collaborators to communicate and cooperate in an atmosphere of frank debate, trust, interdependence, and mutual positive expectation so that the mutual benefits and interests may be achieved. This mechanism may enable each component of the system to monitor its performance and to adjust its operation to ensure uniform quality of its input‐output. In short, it may allow the system to learn, adapt and evolve.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Katherine Carroll

Purpose – This chapter critically engages with a positively oriented emotional reflexivity with the aim of improving inclusivity in bereavement research.…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter critically engages with a positively oriented emotional reflexivity with the aim of improving inclusivity in bereavement research.

Methodology/Approach – The heartfelt positivity methodology intentionally creates positivity through the everyday practices of academic research. In this chapter, emotional reflexivity is guided by the heartfelt positivity methodology to identify and learn from collaborators’ emotions. It focuses on collaborators whose involvement in the academic community falls beyond that of the immediate research team at different stages of bereavement research.

Findings – The emotions of collaborators involved in bereavement research have been overlooked, yet their inclusion reveals a significant potential for the sanctioning of bereaved mothers’ potential participation in bereavement-focused research or breastmilk donation programmes. Key learnings that may be applied to conducting future bereavement research are (i) the potential for collaborators to also be bereaved parents (ii) the continued need to strive for the inclusion of bereaved parents in research and (iii) to extend the methodological principle of emotional reflexivity to include research collaborators when researching emotionally sensitive topics.

Originality/Value – This chapter argues that bereaved mothers’ knowledge and practices of thriving in hard times can either be fostered or derailed at different stages of the research cycle depending on which narratives frame human suffering. For researchers and collaborators, emotional reflexivity is crucial to inclusive research practices and knowledge translation.

Details

Emotion and the Researcher: Sites, Subjectivities, and Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-611-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Mário Franco and Joana Almeida

This paper aims to understand the association between organisational learning and leadership styles in the healthcare context.

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9199

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the association between organisational learning and leadership styles in the healthcare context.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was applied in two continuous care units in the same Portuguese healthcare organisation (single case study). Data were obtained from a survey of 28 collaborators and an interview with its manager‐leader/general director. Documental analysis was also used.

Findings

The findings attested to the central role of organisational learning and leadership in organisational performance/effectiveness within healthcare organisations. Different levels of performance were identified in the organisation selected. The practical implications of findings are also discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The study of a single case has been analysed, with the consequent disadvantage of not considering generalisation. For this reason, further research should be carried out to detect structural and cultural differences in healthcare organisations. On the other hand, most of the writing on organisational learning and leadership is conceptual, so this empirical study was important.

Originality/value

Despite the vast quantity of studies in the domain of leadership and organisational learning, very little work associates these two topics. Taking into account the relevance of these research topics for healthcare organisations, the findings give additional support to the argument that leadership plays an important role in instilling organisational learning in the healthcare sector.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Wei Zhou, David Heesom, Panagiotis Georgakis and Joseph H.M. Tah

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the CSCW in collaborative 4D modelling and its user interface (UI)/interaction designs for prototyping. Four-dimensional (4D…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the CSCW in collaborative 4D modelling and its user interface (UI)/interaction designs for prototyping. Four-dimensional (4D) modelling technology has potentials to integrate geographically dispersed planners to achieve collaborative construction planning. However, applying this technology in teamwork remains a challenge in computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW).

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted user-centred design (UCD) methodology to investigate a usable 4D collaboration prototype through analysis, design and usability testing. By applying CSCW theories, it first clarified the meaning of 4D CSCW to formulate design propositions as design target. By leveraging UCD theories, subsequently, the first-stage research sought an optimal standalone 4D modelling prototype following a parallel design approach. At the second stage, it further investigated into a collaborative 4D modelling prototype using an iterative design. It adopted collaborative task analysis into the UI/interaction design extension for a collaborative prototype based on results obtained from the first stage. The final usability testing was performed on the collaborative prototype to evaluate the designed CSCW and UI in a controlled geographically dispersed teamwork situation.

Findings

The test results and user feedback verified their usability. It also disclosed design weaknesses in collaborators’ awareness and smooth tasks’ transitions for further enhancement.

Originality/value

The combination of CSCW and UCD theories is practical for designing collaborative 4D modelling. It can also benefit designs for collaborative modelling in other dimensions like cost analysis, sustainable design, facility management, etc. in building information modelling.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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