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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2005

Jill Nemiro, Stefanus Hanifah and Jing Wang

Contemporary organizations have realized the importance of creating work environments that energize and sustain collaborative capacity. Nowhere is the need for…

Abstract

Contemporary organizations have realized the importance of creating work environments that energize and sustain collaborative capacity. Nowhere is the need for collaborative capacity more apparent than when business interactions and collaborative work efforts cross country boundaries. Collaborative capacity is the foundation to an organization's key resource, the collaborative capital. Creating a work environment or climate that supports, enhances, and maintains collaborative capacity is essential for achieving high levels of collaborative capital. In this chapter, we review an exploratory, cross-cultural investigation of the work environments that guide organizations (public and private universities) in the United States and in several Asian countries. One hundred and ninety-four staff from a university in the United States and a combined total of 976 individuals from eight universities throughout Asia (Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan) were asked to assess their organizations’ work environments using the Performance Environmental Perception Scale (PEPS; David Ripley (1998) The development of the performance environment perception scale and its underlying theoretical model. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville). We describe what work environment factors were viewed the same across Eastern and Western cultures, and what factors were viewed differently. Additionally, we present a model of work environment factors that can be used to enhance and sustain collaborative capacity across Eastern and Western cultures.

Details

Collaborative Capital: Creating Intangible Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-222-1

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Peter Kahn, Christos Petichakis and Lorraine Walsh

The complexities and challenges inherent in research often require collaborative rather than solitary or team‐based forms of working. This paper seeks to open new…

Abstract

Purpose

The complexities and challenges inherent in research often require collaborative rather than solitary or team‐based forms of working. This paper seeks to open new perspectives onto the nature of collaborative research and onto strategies for developing the capacity of researchers to engage in it.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines a speculative model of collaborative working in higher education that is rooted in critical realist perspectives, using it to ground a conceptual analysis of a stage model of expertise for collaborative working taken from the researcher development framework (RDF) developed in the UK by the organisation Vitae.

Findings

The paper highlights the contribution that theory can make to the practice of researcher development, drawing out the relevance of personal engagement, professional dialogue and collaborative vehicles to support shared practice in pursuit of mutual goals. In this way, it identifies gaps within the stage model that pertain to relational, disciplinary, situational and other elements. The paper articulates insights for the development of the capacity of researchers for collaborative working that prioritise dialogue that is situated within given contexts for research. The analysis draws out implications for the development of collaborative capacity of such notions as corporate agency and collaborative reach.

Originality/value

This paper articulates a novel approach to conceptualising capacity for collaborative research and offers a theoretical critique of a given descriptor taken from Vitae's RDF. As such it assists in developing the scholarly basis for the field of researcher development.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Xiaomi An, Hepu Deng, Lemen Chao and Wenlin Bai

This paper aims to investigate the role of knowledge management in collaborative innovation and identifies the knowledge management approaches for supporting collaborative

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of knowledge management in collaborative innovation and identifies the knowledge management approaches for supporting collaborative innovation community capacity building (CICCB) in organizations. The importance of collaborative innovation in developing organizational competitiveness is increasingly being recognized in both theory and practice worldwide. Collaborative innovation, however, is still under-explored from the trans-disciplinary perspective of knowledge management and community capacity building.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of the related literature in collaborative innovation and knowledge management is conducted. Three demands for CICCB, including trust building for enhancing the effectiveness, sustainability building for improving the efficiency and extensibility building for developing the competitiveness in organizations, are identified, which paves the way for the development of a holistic approach to effective CICCB.

Findings

Three roles of knowledge management in supporting CICCB are identified, including the reformation of knowledge management for convergence in collaboration, the remediation of knowledge activities for synergy in communication and the reconfiguration of knowledge artifacts for the integration of knowledge management activities in connectivity. A holistic approach is proposed for effective CICCB in organizations, including the multi-dimensional convergence for trust building in collaboration, the multi-directional synergy for sustainability building in communication and the multi-layer integration for extensibility building in connectivity.

Research limitations/implications

Insights about how organizations can better support CICCB through effective knowledge management for improving their competitiveness are provided based on the identification of the demand for CICCB and the role of knowledge management in collaborative innovation. The development of a holistic approach to effective CICCB can help organizations better utilize their limited resources for developing their competitiveness in today’s dynamic environment.

Originality/value

This paper is the first step of a comprehensive study on the role of knowledge management in supporting CICCB in organizations in today’s dynamic environment. It provides a solid foundation for the investigation of the models, approaches and mechanisms for effective CICCB through knowledge management in organizations.

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Stephen P. Fitzgerald

Collaborative forms range from co-located teams engaged in short term local projects, to international joint ventures, to worldwide networks of organizations and citizens…

Abstract

Collaborative forms range from co-located teams engaged in short term local projects, to international joint ventures, to worldwide networks of organizations and citizens linked together to generate global social change. In order to discern patterns that transcend the breadth of forms (including virtual), a new term is introduced that encompasses the entire spectrum: collaborative entity (CE). The diverse and far-ranging CE literature is then integrated into the Collaborative Capacity (CC) Framework. That framework is comprised of ten broad constructs and their interrelationships that, when considered together, capture fundamental aspects of all CEs. The CC Framework provides a bridge-building language to help facilitate inter-disciplinary, multi-dimensional dialogue, research, and perspectives on fostering collaborative capacity.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Nisha Bamel, Sanjay Dhir and Sushil Sushil

The purpose of this paper is to identify the inter-partner dynamics-based enablers of joint venture (JV) competitiveness. In addition, this paper models the interactions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the inter-partner dynamics-based enablers of joint venture (JV) competitiveness. In addition, this paper models the interactions among identified enablers/factors to project the strength of their relationship with JV competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

ISM- and total interpretive structural modeling (TISM)-based fuzzy TISM approach has been used to examine the interactions and strength of interactions among identified enablers of JV competitiveness.

Findings

The analysis concludes that inter-partner dynamics-based enablers, such as partner fit, power symmetry and trust, have strong driving power and low dependence power and are at the lowest level of hierarchy in fuzzy TISM model. Variables like collaborative communication, organizational learning and absorptive capacity are linkage variables and they have high dependence as well as driving power and they lie in the second level of fuzzy TISM hierarchy. Strategic flexibility is found to have high dependence power and has weak driving power. The outcome variable JV competitiveness found to have zero driving power and highest dependence power.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for practitioners and policy makers. JVs may achieve competitiveness by managing identified enablers (inter-partner dynamics).

Originality/value

Present paper is one among the few efforts that address the issue of JV competitiveness (post-formation of JV). Methodologically also, this study is one among few initial efforts of using modified fuzzy TISM to explore and understand the linkage among enablers and outcome variables. Modified fuzzy TISM process carries out transitivity checks along with the successive pair-wise comparisons and simplifies the fuzzy TISM approach.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Brenda A. Barker Scott and Michael R. Manning

Ask leaders what their organizations need more of to thrive, and many will identify collaboration. Yet many collaborative efforts fail. A focus on the inner workings of…

Abstract

Ask leaders what their organizations need more of to thrive, and many will identify collaboration. Yet many collaborative efforts fail. A focus on the inner workings of teams, to the exclusion of the ecosystem in which teams work, has masked the importance of a collaborative context. We undertook a single case study of an exemplar firm with the intent of offering a nuanced illustration of the collaborative workplace. We illustrate how three contextual factors related to work, relationships, and behaviors shift the setting from a place where collaboration is hard to do, to one that embodies collaboration as a widespread competence.

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Sheila Namagembe

The aim of the study was to examine the role of collaborative approaches (productive collaboration, collaborative innovation and collaborative risk management) in disaster…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to examine the role of collaborative approaches (productive collaboration, collaborative innovation and collaborative risk management) in disaster risk situations. Thus, the study focused on the effect of productive collaboration and collaborative innovation on collaborative risk management, and the effect of collaborative risk management and collaborative innovation on adaptability.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The Covariance Based Structural Equation Modeling software was used to obtain results on the influence of productive collaboration and collaborative innovation on collaborative risk management, the influence of collaborative innovation on adaptability and the influence of collaborative risk management on adaptability.

Findings

Findings indicated that both productive collaboration and collaborative innovation influence collaborative risk management, and both collaborative innovation and collaborative risk management influence adaptability.

Research limitations/implications

The study mainly focused on the NGOs eliminating the government, beneficiaries and other actors that may be involved in disaster risk situations. The research has implications to decision makers in government, NGOs and other actors concerned with disaster risk management.

Originality/value

Countries worldwide are focusing on collaborative innovation and productive collaboration in addition to collaborative risk management to respond to epidemics and natural disasters. Despite the relevance of the collaborative initiatives, empirical research explaining the relevance of the variables to adaptability of actors during epidemics or natural disasters is still lacking.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Rod Erakovich and Trisha Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to examine critically private (for profit), public and not‐for‐profit sector management strategies with a focus to assess and enhance…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine critically private (for profit), public and not‐for‐profit sector management strategies with a focus to assess and enhance organizational capacity building through cross‐sector collaboration. This topic is considered from both a contemporary and an evolutionary perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on research from secondary sources.

Findings

This paper identifies barriers to collaboration and measures for effectively creating organizational change to build cross‐sector capacity.

Research limitations/implications

While considerable literature exists on organizational change, none includes the need for cross‐sector collaboration to increase management capability to move beyond current economic, social and market development capacity. This study addresses this gap.

Practical implications

The adoption of management practices to understand values across sectors will improve effectiveness of organizations across sectors. These recommendations will also facilitate economic development reform efforts of policy makers.

Originality/value

The paper, based on original research, makes a significant contribution to the ability to understand managing in a cross‐sector collaborative manner.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Adina Dudau, Alvise Favotto and Georgios Kominis

This chapter reviews the conditions leading to the emergence of hybrid network structures involved in public service delivery, analyses opportunities for boundary-spanning…

Abstract

This chapter reviews the conditions leading to the emergence of hybrid network structures involved in public service delivery, analyses opportunities for boundary-spanning by network members and frames these against different manifestations of leadership in such collaborative contexts. It addresses a gap in knowledge around leadership in hybrid networks, on the one hand, and around effectiveness of hybrid networks, on the other hand. Following an in-depth case-study of a hybrid network (local safeguarding children boards, LSCB) in England, UK, we advance a researchable proposition according to which, in turbulent times, the effectiveness of such networks is enhanced through one particular leadership type rather than others.

Details

Hybridity in the Governance and Delivery of Public Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-769-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Heiko Gebauer, Mikael Johnson and Bo Enquist

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of organisational capabilities (dynamic and operational) in the formation of value networks in the context of public…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of organisational capabilities (dynamic and operational) in the formation of value networks in the context of public transport services.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical argument is substantiated with qualitative data from four narratives on value network formations in the Swiss public transport system. These four narratives cover two types of new value networks: incremental improvements in established value networks; and radical leaps in emerging value networks.

Findings

These two types of new value networks entail the co‐evolution of different dynamic and operational capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the qualitative research approach.

Practical implications

Public transport operators can utilise the findings on organisational capabilities to guide incremental improvements in their existing value network and/or radical leaps into an emerging value network.

Social implications

Governments should not only seek to increase transport capacity, but also aim to develop value networks to enhance public transport service experiences.

Originality/value

The paper applies value‐network thinking to public transport services. It offers a comprehensive framework to help organisations manage the formation of value networks. The results provide testable propositions that can be used to guide future research.

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