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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Neil Robdale

Neil Robdale describes how the Enable pilot job retention project has been successfully developed into a county‐wide service that aims to step in before people…

Abstract

Neil Robdale describes how the Enable pilot job retention project has been successfully developed into a county‐wide service that aims to step in before people experiencing mental health problems become long‐term unemployed and help negotiate a return to their former job. Key to the success of the service is taking referrals directly from GPs, as well as from the community mental health teams, although this requires considerable investment in promoting the service.

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A Life in the Day, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Anthony (Tony) Ferguson, Frederick Nesta and Colin Storey

The purpose of this paper is to present the experiences of three western librarians in adapting their management styles for working and living in a new culture.

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1641

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the experiences of three western librarians in adapting their management styles for working and living in a new culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Three university library directors who have been working as expatriates in Hong Kong for 2 to 18 years were asked to comment on their own personal experiences in moving to a new culture, a new language environment, and new management challenges.

Findings

Moving to a new culture can be difficult for the expatriate and his family but work environments have many similarities. Developing an understanding of the local professional culture and working within is vital to success.

Practical implications

The paper presents some guidelines for librarians who may be seeking a career abroad.

Originality/value

There is very little literature on librarians, particularly those in management, who have chosen to continue their careers abroad. This paper provides first‐hand experiences and demonstrates that librarianship shares a certain commonality and that management skills can be adapted to new cultures.

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Colin Storey

The purpose of this paper is to address the dangers and opportunities for a highly trained group of professionals – librarians – in responding to the present and future…

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1583

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the dangers and opportunities for a highly trained group of professionals – librarians – in responding to the present and future challenges, for example from the web's so‐called digital natives and from the web's bare‐fisted market forces.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a general view of the current state‐of‐play in library management vis‐a‐vis the e‐revolution, in terms of the history and future of the profession.

Findings

Librarians are in danger of casting off the primordial and deeply original tenets of the profession (the term “ur‐librarianship” is suggested here to refer to this canon of library beliefs). Librarians may well become irrelevant shadows of their former selves by embracing a mish‐mash of misdirected and misappropriated ideologies and peripheral priorities from other, newer, professions and undo centuries of hard work (here referred to as “un‐librarianship”). In consequence, readers, in a cloud of unknowing, would not understand who librarians are, what they do, and especially, what they stand for. Librarians have opportunities to re‐enliven the developmental arc of venerable tradition and to recast agile services to sustain, as in the long past, an absolutely unquestioned place in society (“uber‐librarianship”). Is it going to be “Librarian Interrupted!”, or “Librarian Triumphant!”?

Practical implications

Librarians need to brand themselves and their libraries distinctly for a successful and relevant future.

Originality/value

Using practical examples from many years of experience in librarianship, the author states some strong opinions on librarians' professional futures.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Colin Storey

Constructing academic library learning spaces involves ad hoc groups of agents often with fuzzy inter-relationships. Librarians and their user communities are initially…

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1763

Abstract

Purpose

Constructing academic library learning spaces involves ad hoc groups of agents often with fuzzy inter-relationships. Librarians and their user communities are initially hailed within these groups as prime-movers in realizing projects. Librarians bring to the table contagious ideas generated from their own profession in the hope of securing appropriate funding and planning pre-requisites. All other agents, be they internal community representatives or external architects, assist them in making sense of each other’s standpoints to co-create dynamic learning spaces in “commons consent”. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the community culture in The Chinese University of Hong Kong as existed in 2012 as a case study, this paper examines the reality of this process in terms of a new library for learning, teaching and research.

Findings

Can librarians hold sway over the priorities of other individual agents, particularly architects, to gain consent to build their initial concept of the commons which they are vigorously promoting as professionally valid and educationally potent? In the co-creation of a building, individual preferences and organizational power structures in ad hoc groups drawn from the university’s distinct cultural environment fuel compromise and even tension around the librarians’ and architects’ original visions.

Research limitations/implications

Many other case studies of library building learning commons projects would be useful to add to these findings in sensemaking, co-creation and community cultures.

Practical implications

Assists library managers in their management of large buildings projects.

Originality/value

An original case study of a major Asian academic library learning commons project which involves sensemaking, co-creation and community cultures ideas imported from construction science.

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Colin Storey

The purpose of this paper is to address the dangers for a highly trained group of professionals – academic librarians – in responding to the challenge of divesting their…

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1449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the dangers for a highly trained group of professionals – academic librarians – in responding to the challenge of divesting their libraries of a very large amount of printed material.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a general view of the current state‐of‐play in library management vis‐à‐vis the e‐revolution, in terms of the corresponding preservation of printed materials.

Findings

Traditionally, the majority stock of any library, rarely used printed books and journals seem to have become a liability and a burden in this web‐spun, e‐raddled world. Academic librarians are becoming active participants in the rush to achieve a “print→less” heaven. For the first time in history on such a scale and in any period of war or peace, the next 20 years could witness a huge and deliberate global dispersal and even destruction of a substantial portion of the printed word in university, college and research libraries. This Fahrenheit 451‐equivalent event would be carefully planned not by ruthless despots and capricious censors riding roughshod over the bodies of librarians to re‐write historical records, but by … the librarians themselves. This is not just “bibliobabble” – defined here as the reactionary ravings of the bibliophile against a tidal wave of e‐books and digital content. Given librarians' innate professional ability for organized thoroughness, a series of small local projects, largely unremarked in the wider world, would be very speedily executed, leading to global and possibly uncoordinated weeding. This sustained dispersal or destruction of printed material from the protective walls of universities and colleges, without the usual finesse or adequate time or resources, will re‐classify “ordinary” works into titles of “relative” or even “absolute” rarity worldwide. Academic librarians will have created a new profession for themselves – “rare book engineers” – by massively reducing the number of copies held in the world's libraries and relying on private book collectors (if they still exist in 2060) to acquire any of the millions of discarded titles and preserve them for posterity.

Practical implications

Librarians need to consider carefully how and where lesser‐used printed materials will be disposed of and sent.

Originality/value

Using practical examples from many years of experience in librarianship, the author states some strong personal opinions on this matter.

Details

Library Management, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Steve O'Connor

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397

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Joanna Tegnerowicz

The aim of this article is an analysis of the links between race and psychotic illness, psychiatric diagnosis and treatment, as well as psychiatric, police and prison…

Abstract

The aim of this article is an analysis of the links between race and psychotic illness, psychiatric diagnosis and treatment, as well as psychiatric, police and prison violence against people with mental health problems. The analysis focuses on Black men who are more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders and who face more brutal treatment than other people with such diagnoses. We have adopted a multidisciplinary approach which draws insights from psychiatry, psychology, and sociology and challenges the biologistic interpretation of “mental illness.” We take into account the United States and Britain – two countries with large Black minorities and an established tradition of research on these groups. Among the crucial findings of this study are the facts that racial bias and stereotypes heavily influence the way Black men with a diagnosis of psychotic illness are treated by the psychiatric system, police and prison staff, and that the dominant approach to psychosis masks the connections between racism and mental health.

Details

Inequality, Crime, and Health Among African American Males
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-051-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Colin Storey

Briefly describes the recent history and development of informationtechnology in Hong Kong Polytechnic University Library in all areas ofoperation. The Library installed…

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2777

Abstract

Briefly describes the recent history and development of information technology in Hong Kong Polytechnic University Library in all areas of operation. The Library installed the Data Research integrated online library system in 1989, and in early 1991 reorganized its management structure in order to respond more quickly and efficiently to the demands of the information revolution. Taking the revolution in information technologies as an exemplar, analyses the effects such fundamental changes have had on the management and organization of the Polytechnic University Library, and the positive responses made by professional librarians to the challenges facing the library service. In particular, focuses on the management of human resources to meet the burgeoning growth and development of electronic systems. How can senior library staff be organized most effectively to exploit the new technology to the benefit of their users? What practical steps can be taken to train academic staff and students in the availability and use of systems?

Details

Library Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Colin Storey

The purpose of this paper is to address two questions: first, faced with the “disruptive technologies” of e‐revolution, will there be academic libraries in 25 years time…

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1082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address two questions: first, faced with the “disruptive technologies” of e‐revolution, will there be academic libraries in 25 years time for our younger colleagues to inherit? Are senior academic library managers reacting rightly and proactively making the correct strategic decisions now to ensure the rightful and proper place for librarians in a university for decades to come? Second, assuming there will indeed be university libraries and “librarians” to people them in the future, what professional and personal attributes will future librarians need, not only to ride the e‐revolution wave, but also to prosper as leaders in their institutions to the year 2057 and beyond?

Design/methodology/approach

A general review of the current state‐of‐play in academic library management vis‐à‐vis the e‐revolution, in terms of the history of the profession and previous perceived “revolutions”.

Findings

Suggests academic library professionals are over‐reacting to the “newness” of the electronic environment and under‐valuing their own professional traditions and their own people.

Practical implications

Proposes remedies: advising caution, common sense, and the right sort of professionals to “brand” the library for a successful future.

Originality/value

The author's own personal views built up after 35 years of experience in academic library management.

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Steve O'Connor

Downloads
830

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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