Search results

1 – 10 of 254
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Gillian Stamp and Colin Stamp

Argues that to survive and prosper in the political, social andeconomic climate of the 1990s and beyond, organizations must find a newway of achieving viability by…

Abstract

Argues that to survive and prosper in the political, social and economic climate of the 1990s and beyond, organizations must find a new way of achieving viability by aligning purposes, people, strategies and structures. Four linked procedures offer a proven way of contributing to viability by viewing the contribution of individuals in the light of organizational purpose. Career Path Appreciation (CPA) is a one‐to‐one interview that allows a trained practitioner to arrive, in two to three hours, at a view about a person′s current and likely future capability to make effective decisions. This is shared first with the respondent and then with the organization. Career Path Mapping (CPM) enables the understanding offered by CPA to be used for the mutual benefit of organization and individual. The Work Journal (WJ) enables people who have recently moved to a new level of responsibility to set down their thoughts and actions in a systematic format that encourages reflection. Organization Mapping (OM) offers an optimal model, indicating where energy can be effectively focused to bring about lasting change, taking into account purpose, patterns of communication and culture, and indicating the relationship between individual capability and the way in which work is structured at seven different levels.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Colin C. Williams, Jan Windebank, Marijana Baric and Sara Nadin

For many decades, European national governments sought to stamp out undeclared work using a repressive approach. In the changing economic context of declining employment…

Abstract

Purpose

For many decades, European national governments sought to stamp out undeclared work using a repressive approach. In the changing economic context of declining employment participation rates, however, the European Commission has called for a new approach to transform undeclared work into declared work. This necessitates public policy innovations. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the degree to which this European Commission call for policy innovation has been adopted by European national governments.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate this, the results are reported of an e‐survey conducted in 2010 of 104 senior stakeholders from government departments, trade unions and employer organisations in 31 European countries, and 24 follow‐up in‐depth interviews.

Findings

The finding is that although European nations have responded to the changing economic context and the resultant call by the European Commission for a new approach by adopting an array of innovative new policy measures to facilitate the declaration of undeclared work, stamping out such endeavour through repression measures remains the principal approach in most nations.

Research limitations/implications

Until now, few studies have evaluated critically the different policy approaches adopted by European national governments to tackle undeclared work. This paper fills that gap.

Practical implications

This paper reveals that if undeclared jobs are to be transformed into declared jobs and economic inclusion promoted, national governments will need to accord more priority to innovative new policy measures to legitimise declared work than is currently the case.

Originality/value

This is the first critical evaluation of whether the European Commission call for innovative new policy measures when tackling undeclared work has been implemented.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1971

Colin Mackenzie

Colin Mackenzie, recently appointed a school governor, discusses their function

Abstract

Colin Mackenzie, recently appointed a school governor, discusses their function

Details

Education + Training, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Colin Lea, E.E. de Kluizenaar and W. Rubin

‘Fluxing and Cleaning in Electronics Soldering’ The Grosvenor Hotel, London, 22 February 1989. ‘To clean or not to clean?’ ‘Aqueous or solvent cleaning?’ ‘What is the…

Abstract

‘Fluxing and Cleaning in Electronics Soldering’ The Grosvenor Hotel, London, 22 February 1989. ‘To clean or not to clean?’ ‘Aqueous or solvent cleaning?’ ‘What is the future for CFCs and other chlorinated solvents?’ The electronics assembly industry is ringing with such questions that make the cleaning of electronic assemblies the key issue for 1989—an issue that urgently requires answers that have the stamp of authority based on fact rather than speculation. This BABS seminar was therefore very timely and attracted a large audience to listen to eight presentations from speakers representing the cleaning equipment manufacturers, flux manufacturers, MoD quality assurance, and users' experience, as well as background on solvents in the environment.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Colin Adamson

Discusses the problems of customer satisfaction surveys, namely thathardly any department other than marketing receives the data collected;questionnaires are biased…

Abstract

Discusses the problems of customer satisfaction surveys, namely that hardly any department other than marketing receives the data collected; questionnaires are biased towards positive answers and are merely a political exercise – they are handed out by different departments and sent out too regularly. Enumerates a number of programmes to stamp out dissatisfaction and concludes that the team which collects and analyses the data should present the line manager with a range of solutions.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Colin Coulson‐Thomas

This article summarizes findings relating to the conduct of directors and boards from a continuing investigation into why some companies are so much more effective than…

Abstract

Purpose

This article summarizes findings relating to the conduct of directors and boards from a continuing investigation into why some companies are so much more effective than others at key activities such as business development, building relationships and creating and exploiting know‐how.

Design/methodology/approach

The research program ranks companies in terms of the outcomes they achieve in the areas examined and compares the most and least effective to isolate critical success factors and distinguish between successful/winning and unsuccessful/losing approaches.

Findings

The findings of the investigation suggest the performance of many companies depends primarily upon what their boards actually do and how their members behave rather than formal governance considerations such as a board's committee structure.

Practical implications

Effective boards adopt particular approaches and can behave very differently from their less successful peers, for example when communicating with various groups of stakeholders. Many boards would make a more significant contribution to the growth and development of their companies if they understood and adopted the approaches of more effective boards. A key element of good corporate governance is to achieve an appropriate balance between a number of critical factors, for example performance today and the capability to compete and win in the future.

Originality/value

In comparison with what could be achieved if more “winning approaches” were adopted many boards are failing to deliver and could do much better. Many appear to be rubber‐stamping rather than shaping things to come, picking over the past rather than creating the future.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

Much to the relief of everyone, the general election has come and gone and with it the boring television drivel; the result a foregone conclusion. The Labour/Trade Union…

Abstract

Much to the relief of everyone, the general election has come and gone and with it the boring television drivel; the result a foregone conclusion. The Labour/Trade Union movement with a severe beating, the worst for half a century, a disaster they have certainly been asking for. Taking a line from the backwoods wisdom of Abraham Lincoln — “You can't fool all the people all the time!” Now, all that most people desire is not to live easy — life is never that and by the nature of things, it cannot be — but to have a reasonably settled, peaceful existence, to work out what they would consider to be their destiny; to be spared the attentions of the planners, the plotters, provocateurs, down to the wilful spoilers and wreckers. They have a right to expect Government protection. We cannot help recalling the memory of a brilliant Saturday, but one of the darkest days of the War, when the earth beneath our feet trembled at the destructive might of fleets of massive bombers overhead, the small silvery Messerschmits weaving above them. Believing all to be lost, we heaped curses on successive Governments which had wrangled over rearmament, especially the “Butter before Guns” brigade, who at the word conscription almost had apoplexy, and left its people exposed to destruction. Now, as then, the question is “Have they learned anything?” With all the countless millions Government costs, its people have the right to claim something for their money, not the least of which is the right to industrial and domestic peace.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 85 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Keri Davies, Colin Gilligan and Clive Sutton

The structure of the UK food manufacturing industry is highly fragmented and consists of some 5,000 firms. Of these, however, the ten largest companies are estimated to…

Abstract

The structure of the UK food manufacturing industry is highly fragmented and consists of some 5,000 firms. Of these, however, the ten largest companies are estimated to account for one‐third of all sales. The importance of the 100 largest private sector firms has traditionally been relatively high within the industry and in 1975, for example, they produced 55 per cent of the food sector's net output, compared with the 40 per cent provided by a similar sample in the total manufacturing sector. Similarly, evidence from both Ashby and Mordue demonstrates that during the 1970s the average size of food manufacturers/processors overtook that of manufacturers as a whole in terms of numbers employed. By the same measure, businesses with more than one hundred employees continued to expand at a faster rate in food than the average for all manufacturers, so that the mean employment size of these larger food enterprises in the late 1970s was more than one‐third greater than in all manufacturing. Smaller establishments, by contrast, are relatively under‐represented in the UK food, drink and tobacco sector, both in comparison with the average for all manufacturers and internationally.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Colin Williams and Alvaro Martinez

– The purpose of this paper is to examine whether men and women starting a business use the informal economy and do so to test the viability of their venture.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether men and women starting a business use the informal economy and do so to test the viability of their venture.

Design/methodology/approach

To do this, the results of a survey of 595 small business owners in the UK conducted in August 2012 are reported.

Findings

Of the 22 per cent of men and 13 per cent of women small business owners reporting that they traded informally when starting their business, 66 per cent of the men and 53 per cent of the women assert that a main reason was to test the viability of their business. Hence, just over one in six small businesses started by men and one in 14 started by women (one in eight overall) traded in the informal economy when starting-up in order to test the viability of the business.

Research limitations/implications

A more extensive survey of a wider range of countries is required to further evaluate the tentative findings of this single country small-scale survey.

Practical implications

If tax administrations seek to stamp out informal sector entrepreneurship, one hand of government will be eradicating a significant minority of the entrepreneurship that other hands of government wish to foster. Men and women starting-up informally, however, require different policy approaches to help them formalise their business ventures.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to analyse whether men and women starting a business trade informally at the outset to test its viability.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Colin C. Williams and Sara J. Nadin

Although there is emerging an understanding that many entrepreneurs conduct some or all of their transactions off‐the‐books, there has so far been little attempt to…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is emerging an understanding that many entrepreneurs conduct some or all of their transactions off‐the‐books, there has so far been little attempt to consider what can and should be done about entrepreneurship in the informal economy. The purpose of this paper is to bridge this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of what is known about the prevalence and nature of informal entrepreneurship, this paper evaluates what can and should be done about informal entrepreneurs by analyzing the various policy options and their implications.

Findings

Evaluating the possible policy approaches of doing nothing, eradication, de‐regulation and facilitating formalisation, the finding is that doing nothing leaves intact the existing negative impacts on formal and informal businesses, customers and governments, whilst eradicating informal entrepreneurship results in governments stamping out precisely the entrepreneurship and enterprise culture that they wish to nurture, and de‐regulation results in a levelling down rather than up of working conditions. Only facilitating the formalisation of informal entrepreneurship is found to be a viable policy approach. How this might be achieved is then considered.

Research limitations/implications

More research is required on the hurdles informal entrepreneurs witness when seeking to legitimize their business ventures in different populations before it can be known whether specific policy measures to facilitate formalisation are appropriate.

Practical implications

This paper evaluates various public policy options for tackling informal entrepreneurship and their impacts.

Originality/value

This is one of the first evaluations of the policy options available for tackling informal entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

1 – 10 of 254