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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Colin Barber

Considers the important ways in which property is different fromother investments and the problems associated with measurement ofinvestment performance in the property…

Abstract

Considers the important ways in which property is different from other investments and the problems associated with measurement of investment performance in the property market. Outlines the features of the difference of property investment as providing a medium‐level ′secure′ income, a different performance cycle, and a lower level of risk. Discusses the issues creating concern over the pricing of property and the ability to measure its performance, and looks at recent developments in the market. Suggests that the processes of evaluation and performance measurement are providing data on a more comparable basis as the property market itself becomes more efficient.

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Journal of Valuation, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

B.M. Amsler, J.S. Busby and G.M. Williams

Traditional costing systems suffer from a number of problemsbecause of the way in which they allocate overheads: product costs havearbitrary components; managers lack…

Abstract

Traditional costing systems suffer from a number of problems because of the way in which they allocate overheads: product costs have arbitrary components; managers lack information about what causes costs to be incurred; and it becomes impossible to know which of several product lines is the most profitable. Describes a case study in which activity‐based costing and process mapping were applied in combination in an engineering firm, where it was found that it was necessary to specify a method of process‐based costing.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Stuart Gronow

The means to quantify the inputs to be used by a valuation surveyor in an explicit model for appraising contaminated land are explored. These relate to treatment…

Abstract

The means to quantify the inputs to be used by a valuation surveyor in an explicit model for appraising contaminated land are explored. These relate to treatment techniques and cost estimates; and forecasting techniques and the forecasting of future rent and capital flows, cost changes and depreciation. A comparison is made with a “traditional” valuation approach. It is concluded that an explicit approach is more likely to satisfy the calls for more sophisticated and creditable approaches and more explanation and justification in appraisals and valuations.

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Property Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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The Marketisation of English Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-856-9

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2010

Colin Wisely

This report concerns itself with the process of change that has been underway in the city of Salford, concerning the adoption of a recovery‐oriented system of care. The…

Abstract

This report concerns itself with the process of change that has been underway in the city of Salford, concerning the adoption of a recovery‐oriented system of care. The paper contains the observations of the lead commissioner for drug treatment in Salford on the process of this change. The paper is influenced by William White's perspectives on recovery in Philadelphia and makes observations on their application in the British context. Finally, there is some discussion of whether this recovery approach constitutes a ‘paradigm change’ in UK drug policy. The information provided in this paper was gathered between January 2009 and July 2010. The methods included 12 initial unstructured interviews with service users self‐defined as ‘in recovery’, combined with two focus groups with seven service users and six members of staff. This initial work was then supplemented with three further focus groups conducted during the summer of 2009, involving 23 front line staff during the summer and autumn of 2009 and 52 consumer satisfaction questionnaires conducted prior to Christmas 2009. A further 40 semi‐structured interviews with service users who self‐defined as being in recovery were also concluded during the spring and summer of 2010.

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Safer Communities, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Book part
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Tinashe Nyamunda

Focusing on Johannes L. Sadie, a South African economist hired to investigate the economic options of Southern Rhodesia at the time of the Unilateral Declaration of…

Abstract

Focusing on Johannes L. Sadie, a South African economist hired to investigate the economic options of Southern Rhodesia at the time of the Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI), this chapter examines the historical, ideological, pedagogical, and international influences of the intersection between economic discourse and racial ideology. Using the example of the Sadie recommendations, this chapter examines how the changing political context informed the state’s approach to the economy. A reading of the context in which Sadie was hired to justify Rhodesia’s UDI and provide legitimacy to its economic policies sheds light onto the Ian Smith regime’s approach to an alternative post-imperial (but not post-settler) state and economy, but it also speaks of the ways in which economic discourse can be deployed for political purposes by authoritarian regimes.

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on Economists and Authoritarian Regimes in the 20th Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-703-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Roger J. Sandilands

Reproduces the main texts of hitherto unpublished reminiscences of the style and influence, as a teacher, of Allyn Abbott Young (1876‐1929) by 17 of his distinguished…

Abstract

Reproduces the main texts of hitherto unpublished reminiscences of the style and influence, as a teacher, of Allyn Abbott Young (1876‐1929) by 17 of his distinguished students. They include Bertil Ohlin, Nicholas Kaldor, James Angell, Lauchlin Currie, Colin Clark, Howard Ellis, Frank Fetter, Earl Hamilton, and Melvin Knight (brother of Frank Knight who, with Edward Chamberlin, was perhaps Young’s most famous PhD student). There has recently been a revival of interest in Young’s influence on US monetary thought and in his theory of economic growth based on endogenous increasing returns. These recollections of his students (addressed to Young’s biographer, Charles Blitch) shed light on why Young has, at least until recently, been renowned more for his massive erudition than for his published writings.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Colin McCaig

Abstract

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The Marketisation of English Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-856-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Yacoob Hosein and Portia Bowen-Chang

This paper aims to provide a study of a structured approach at map cataloguing training by a team of cataloguers at the Alma Jordan Library of the University of the West…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a study of a structured approach at map cataloguing training by a team of cataloguers at the Alma Jordan Library of the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a case study which underscores the value of the experiences of cataloguers at training themselves in a particular cartographic format.

Findings

The collaborative efforts of the cataloguers facilitated the further development of institutional expertise and provided the required skills set for increasing bibliographic access in a specialised format.

Originality/value

The paper brings to bear the uniqueness of the cataloguing of Caribbean cartographic materials in a team-teaching setting which serves as a model for other academic libraries and information centres.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Michael W. Hill

There are two categories of ethical behaviour which affect the MIP. The first and most often discussed, includes those principles which encourage working for the welfare…

Abstract

There are two categories of ethical behaviour which affect the MIP. The first and most often discussed, includes those principles which encourage working for the welfare and prosperity of society: “Ethics for High Days”. The second consists of those principles which regulate one's everyday working practices: “Everyday Ethics”. It is with the latter that this paper is primarily concerned. Especially is it concerned with the fact that in everyday work one finds that sound ethical principles conflict with each other. Because of this, doubt arises whether it is worth establishing a formalised code of professional behaviour. After reviewing the pros and cons the author concludes that there are sufficient benefits to justify formulating a code though it will be useful mainly for public relations and for defending one's right to act in a professional manner. A number of ethical conflicts the MIP may encounter are reviewed, especially those in which modern information and communication technologies may play a part. [Since both men and women are MIPs, the words “he” and “she” will be used indiscriminately in the text] “And being exceedingly credulous would stuff his many letters sent to A.W. with fooleries and misinformations, which sometimes would guide him into the paths of error.” Richard Barber (ed.), Brief Lives by John Aubrey. London: The Folio Society, 1975, p.11. In his introduction to this recent edition of Brief Lives, a 17th century classic of English literature, Barber was quoting a description of Aubrey's work as an information searcher for one Anthony a Wood (A.W.), an Oxford antiquary. If Aubrey is a typical example of our predecessors, it is just as well that nowadays there are professional societies of information scientists and documentalists dedicated, inter alia, to maintaining proper professional standards. Indeed, as those who have read it will know, Brief Lives itself, Aubrey's masterpiece, is little but a very scrappy, not wholly reliable, set of short biographies of many eminent men of that century, Shakespeare and Sir Walter Raleigh among them. No modern information worker (or biographer) would be allowed to get away with a piece of work like it. Nor, I fear, would his more worthy product achieve such lasting fame. The problems of how thorough to be and when and whether to submit partial results are ones that affect information workers today just as much as in the 17th century, perhaps more so since professional time is very costly. So do a great many other problems which have an ethical component within them. In this paper I want to look at some of the everyday issues which members of the profession may face and to see whether the new communication technologies have made them easier or more difficult to resolve or even raise new problems.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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