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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Mary Callaghan, Michal Molcho, Saoirse Nic Gabhainn and Colette Kelly

– Availability and access to food is a determinant of obesity. The purpose of this paper is to examine food availability within and outside of post-primary schools in Ireland.

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Abstract

Purpose

Availability and access to food is a determinant of obesity. The purpose of this paper is to examine food availability within and outside of post-primary schools in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the internal school food environment were collected from 63 post-primary schools using questionnaires. The external school food environment for these 63 schools was assessed by mapping food businesses within 1 km of schools, using a Geographic Information System (GIS). Food businesses were categorised based on type of food sold.

Findings

A total of 68.3 per cent of schools had a canteen, 52.5 per cent had a small food shop and 37.1 per cent had a vending machine. A total of 32.7 per cent of schools reported selling chips (French fries) in their canteen while 44.2 per cent of schools reported selling energy-dense nutrient-poor foods in their school shop. Of the schools surveyed, there was an average of 3.89 coffee shops and sandwich bars, 3.65 full service restaurants, 2.60 Asian and other “ethnic” restaurants, 4.03 fast food restaurants, 1.95 supermarkets, 6.71 local shops and 0.73 fruit and vegetable retailers within a 1 km radius of the post-primary schools. Findings are presented by geography (urban/rural), disadvantage (Delivering Equality of Opportunity in School (DEIS)/non DEIS), gender (girls/boys/mixed) and food policy in place at the school (yes/no).

Practical implications

These data will facilitate schools working on the framework for Health Promoting Schools in Ireland.

Social implications

This work can contribute to current discussions on restricting accessibility to certain foods and food premises for school children.

Originality/value

The study explores the internal and external school food environment. GIS have been used to link the external food environment to specific schools thus allowing a comprehensive analysis of the schools’ food environment. To the authors knowledge, this is the first time that both environments are explored simultaneously.

Details

Health Education, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Colette Kelly, Pauline Clerkin, Saoirse Nic Gabhainn and Maureen Mulvihill

Schools are thought to represent a growing marketing opportunity for food advertisers in many countries. Marketing of unhealthy food to children is linked to the increased…

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Abstract

Purpose

Schools are thought to represent a growing marketing opportunity for food advertisers in many countries. Marketing of unhealthy food to children is linked to the increased prevalence of obesity worldwide. This paper aims to explore ways in which schools respond to commercial activity around food marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

A census survey in the Republic of Ireland was employed to investigate the extent of commercial activity in post‐primary schools in Ireland, with a focus on food marketing. School policies related to commercialism and promoting healthy living to children and respondents' attitudes to these issues were explored.

Findings

Food sales are a prevalent form of commercial activity in schools with 81.4 per cent operating shops or canteens that sell snacks, 44.7 per cent drinks vending machines and 28.0 per cent snack vending machines. A total of 38 per cent of schools reported that they accept for‐profit sponsorship and the primary reason was inadequate funding for equipment (91.6 per cent), especially sports equipment. The majority (87.3 per cent) agreed with establishing a national voluntary code of practice in relation to industry sponsorship, which is recommended by the Irish National Taskforce on Obesity. Few schools have policies that refer to commercial sponsorship (7.0 per cent), but schools would welcome receiving guidance and support in developing such policies.

Practical implications

The extent of commercial activity in schools and the possible effect on children and their families need to be disseminated widely. A mechanism for monitoring the type and volume of commercialism, and food marketing in particular, in schools in Ireland is necessary.

Originality/value

These findings provide a baseline to monitor the future direction of commercialism in Irish schools.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Natasha Daniels, Colette Kelly, Michal Molcho, Jane Sixsmith, Molly Byrne and Saoirse Nic Gabhainn

Active travel to school, by walking or cycling, can positively influence children's health and increase physical activity. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Active travel to school, by walking or cycling, can positively influence children's health and increase physical activity. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the context and promoters and barriers of active travel, and the required actions and actors that need to be involved to address each of these.

Design/methodology/approach

Both quantitative and participative research methodologies were employed. The sample consisted of 73 children aged between 11 and 13 years from four primary schools in the West of Ireland. A self-completion questionnaire was followed by a participative protocol conducted with the class groups.

Findings

Overall 30.1 per cent of children reported that they actively travelled to school. A greater proportion of children from urban and disadvantaged schools actively travelled. Proximity to the school was the most frequently reported promoter and barrier. The children identified many actors that need to be involved to eliminate the barriers and enact the promoters of active travel to school. They also highlighted the need for a multi-sectorial approach to improve active travel rates in Ireland.

Originality/value

This study holds potential value in addressing the continued decline in active travel to school in Ireland as it shares a new perspective on the issue; that of the children. Adopting a participative approach allowed the children to participate in groups and develop the data themselves. The children confirmed that they have a relevant and valuable understanding of the process necessary to address active travel to school as a public health issue in Ireland.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Aingeal de Róiste, Colette Kelly, Michal Molcho, Aoife Gavin and Saoirse Nic Gabhainn

There is increasing recognition of children's abilities to speak for themselves. School democracy, as demonstrated by genuine participation, has the potential to benefit…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is increasing recognition of children's abilities to speak for themselves. School democracy, as demonstrated by genuine participation, has the potential to benefit both teachers and students; leading to better relationships and improved learning experiences. The aim of this study is to investigate whether participation in schools in Ireland is linked with perceived academic performance, liking school and positive health perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via self‐completion questionnaires from a stratified random sample of 10,334 students aged 10‐17 years in Irish schools. The questions included encouragement to express their views in class, participation in the organisation of school events; taking part in making school rules; liking school, perceived academic performance, self‐rated health, life satisfaction and self‐reported happiness. Associations between school participation and other measures were expressed by odds ratios from logistic regression models, conducted separately for girls and boys.

Findings

More than 63 per cent of participating students reported that they were encouraged to express their views in class, 58 per cent that they were involved in organising school events and 22 per cent that they had been involved in making school rules. All forms of participation were lower among older students. Participation in school was significantly associated with liking school and higher perceived academic performance, better self‐rated health, higher life satisfaction and greater reported happiness.

Research limitations/implications

These data are all cross‐sectional and relationships cannot imply causality.

Practical implications

These findings underscore the relevance of school participation for students in Ireland.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that, in general, positive relationships between school participation and health and wellbeing are demonstrated among Irish children.

Details

Health Education, vol. 112 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Céleste M. Brotheridge

The purpose of this paper is to build a practical understanding of the workplace bullying process through the perspective of multiple theories.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build a practical understanding of the workplace bullying process through the perspective of multiple theories.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a number of questions regarding bullying in the workplace that a practitioner, described in the paper, may have. Then, each question is answered through the vantage point of a particular theoretical perspective. In particular, theories are referenced that have not typically been used to explain workplace bullying, but that have proven useful for understanding behavior in other contexts.

Findings

The answers to a number of practical questions are informed by multiple theoretical perspectives on workplace bullying. These questions include why people engage in and persist in bullying others, why certain individuals are targeted by bullies, how targets deal with bullying, and why bullying may be tolerated in organizations. Bullying is complex and multi‐determined. It is, in part, an individual level problem concerning the dyadic relationship between two individuals. In this manner, it can be seen that there are various personality attributes, both strengths and weaknesses, and personal background characteristics at play in the bully‐target relationship. However, it is grounded in a social context, at the team level and more broadly, that permits it to happen and indeed fosters its development. This context includes other individuals in the workplace who support it in some fashion, the work team and the organization itself.

Practical implications

Although there are no simple answers, managers and human resource professionals can draw upon the insights that are presented as a means of planning multiple points of intervention in the bullying process.

Originality/value

The paper builds a bridge between theory and practice as a means of connecting researchers and managers. The sampling of theoretical perspectives that are employed answer relevant questions in a coherent manner and, in doing so, provide a unique way of understanding bullying.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Thomas William Aspinall, Adrian Gepp, Geoff Harris, Simone Kelly, Colette Southam and Bruce Vanstone

The pitching research template (PRT) is designed to help pitchers identify the core elements that form the framework of any research project. This paper aims to provide a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The pitching research template (PRT) is designed to help pitchers identify the core elements that form the framework of any research project. This paper aims to provide a brief commentary on an application of the PRT to pitch an environmental finance research topic with a personal reflection on the pitch exercise discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies the PRT developed by Faff (2015, 2019) to a research project on estimating the strength of carbon pricing signals under the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme.

Findings

The PRT is found to be a valuable tool to refine broad ideas into impactful and novel research contributions. The PRT is recommended for use by all academics regardless of field and particularly PhD students to structure and communicate their research ideas. The PRT is found to be particularly well suited to pitch replication studies, as it effectively summarizes both the “idea” and proposed “twist” of a replication study.

Originality/value

This letter is a reflection on a research teams experience with applying the PRT to pitch a replication study at the 2020 Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand event. This event focused on replicable research and was a unique opportunity for research teams to pitch their replication research ideas.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Christine Gervais and Amanda Watson

This chapter argues that feminist inquiries and activism must be pursued considering women’s marginalized position within a religious institution in Canada in the 21st…

Abstract

This chapter argues that feminist inquiries and activism must be pursued considering women’s marginalized position within a religious institution in Canada in the 21st century. Drawing on Canadian Catholic nuns’ unique accounts of their experiences with the Roman Catholic Church, this chapter brings nuance to the complicated power dynamics navigated by women religious to show how women remain excluded and exploited in various ways in their own religious institutions. We point to the institutionalized Roman Catholic Church’s long-standing control over women’s reproductive rights, as well as its ongoing prohibition and recent criminalization of women’s ordination. We also address recent structural dynamics at play by drawing attention to a recent Vatican investigation and ongoing surveillance of women religious in North America under newly established church doctrine. We view these recent tactics as evidence of the Vatican’s renewed commitment to existing gender hierarchies within the Church. Feminist intervention is especially important considering this deepening patriarchal power and how, by extension, the church is regressing rather than progressing towards gender equality, even while it shows evidence of shifting attitudes on other social issues. This chapter also underscores the implications of a global religious institution for women in Canada.

Details

Global Currents in Gender and Feminisms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-484-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Colette Batterbee and Dave Nicholas

This article summarizes the main findings of a survey, undertaken in early 1994, of open access CD‐ROM in British public libraries. The survey examined how well Public…

Abstract

This article summarizes the main findings of a survey, undertaken in early 1994, of open access CD‐ROM in British public libraries. The survey examined how well Public Library Authorities (PLAs) were implementing CD‐ROM technology for public use and how well the general public were fairing with CD‐ROMs. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in nature: current national statistics for CD‐ROM distribution in PLAs were sought, case studies of 13 PLAs who provided open access CD‐ROM were conducted and finally an end‐user survey of 4 of these libraries was undertaken. The principal findings of the survey are as follows. In 1992 only 5% of PLAs provided CD‐ROMs for public use, but by 1994 this figure had risen to 12%. London and English County PLAs had the highest proportion of CD‐ROMs for public use. PLAs with CD‐ROM services were not necessarily the big spending authorities. National newspapers accounted for the majority of CD‐ROMs in use. The main management concerns were lack of adequate user training and documentation. All PLAs wanted to update and expand their CD‐ROM services. This matched one of the main demands from users, which was for more facilities, but PLAs failed to address the users' other main demand ‐ the provision of greater assistance. The predominant user group was young students. Educational institutions played a significant role in training users in the use of CD‐ROMs. Most users searched newspaper and business titles. Finally, there was a high level of user satisfaction with CD‐ROM searching.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Madeleine Leonard and Grace Kelly

This paper aims to explore how lone mothers define “good” mothering and outlines the extent to which feelings of pride and shame permeate their narratives.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how lone mothers define “good” mothering and outlines the extent to which feelings of pride and shame permeate their narratives.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data on which the paper is based is drawn from semi-structured interviews with 32 lone mothers from Northern Ireland. All the lone mothers resided in low-income households.

Findings

Lone mothers experienced shame on three levels: at the level of the individual whereby they internalised feelings of shame; at the level of the collective whereby they internalised how they perceived being shamed by others in their networks but also engaged in shaming and at the level of wider society whereby they recounted how they felt shamed by government agencies and the media.

Originality/value

While a number of researchers have explored how shame stems from poverty and from “deviant” identities such as lone motherhood, the focus on pride is less developed. The paper responds to this vacuum by exploring how pride may counterbalance shame's destructive and scarring tendencies.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2022

Klaas Stek

Industry 4.0 or the Fourth Industrial Revolution is characterized by robotic process automation and machine-to-machine communications. Since computers, machines, and…

Abstract

Industry 4.0 or the Fourth Industrial Revolution is characterized by robotic process automation and machine-to-machine communications. Since computers, machines, and robots share information and knowledge more swiftly and effectively than humans, the question is what human beings' role could be in the era of the Internet-of-Thing. The answer would be beneficial to institutions for higher education to anticipate. The literature reveals a gap between the intended learning outcomes in higher education institutions and the needs of employers in Industry 4.0. Evidence is shown that higher education mainly focused on knowledge (know-what) and theory-based (know-why) intended learning outcomes. However, competent professionals require knowledge (know-what), understanding of the theory (know-why), professional (know-how) and interpersonal skills (know-how and know-who), and need intrapersonal traits such as creativeness, persistence, a result-driven attitude et cetera. Therefore, intended learning outcomes in higher education should also develop interpersonal skills and intrapersonal characteristics. Yet, personality development is a personal effort vital for contemporary challenges. The history of the preceding industrial revolutions showed the drawbacks of personality and character education; politicians have abused it to control societies in the 19th and 20th centuries. In the discussion section, the institutions for higher education are alerted that the societal challenges of the twenty-first century could lead to a form of personality education that is not in the student's interest and would violate Isaiah Berlin's philosophical concept of ‘positive freedom’.

Details

Smart Industry – Better Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-715-3

Keywords

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