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Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-618-2

Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Elisabeth Krecké and Carine Krecké

The cognitive sciences, having emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, are recently experiencing a spectacular renewal, which cannot leave unaffected any…

Abstract

The cognitive sciences, having emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, are recently experiencing a spectacular renewal, which cannot leave unaffected any discipline that deals with human behavior. The primary motivation for our project has been to weigh up the impact that this ongoing revolution of the sciences of the mind is likely to have on social sciences – in particular, on economics. The idea was to gather together a diverse group of social scientists to think about the following questions. Have the various new approaches to cognition provoked a crisis in economic science?1 Should we speak of a scientific revolution (in the sense of Kuhn) also in contemporary social sciences, occurring under the growing influence of the cognitive paradigm? Above all, can a more precise knowledge of the complex functioning of the human mind and brain advance in any way the understanding of economic decision-making?

Details

Cognition and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-465-2

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

George Adam Holland

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of collaboration within information science, to argue for distinct meanings for interdisciplinary and…

3927

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of collaboration within information science, to argue for distinct meanings for interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research and to answer two questions: What philosophic distinction can be made between inter‐ and multi‐disciplinary efforts? Is one more valuable than the other to information science research?

Design/methodology/approach

The semantic inconsistency for describing collaboration is identified in information science. Philosophic analysis of the terms interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary is conducted, arguing for distinct meanings. A case study through cognitive science exploring the philosophic meanings is developed.

Findings

Interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity are very distinct in terms of methods and frameworks. Interdisciplinary research has longer‐term benefits for information science, but multidisciplinary research can also fulfil valid collaborative roles in information science.

Research limitations/implications

A brief technical discussion of cognitive science theory lends itself to those interested in cognitive science. The paper is philosophic in nature.

Practical implications

The inconsistencies surrounding the terms interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary have impact on professional practice. The argument for more consistent terminology will introduce more semantic integrity and reduce miscommunication. There is a challenge to engage in more interdisciplinary research and practice within information science.

Originality/value

Collaboration is a common term used, but little research into what it precisely means within information science has been conducted. The paper argues for a clear distinction between various types of collaboration, and provides a case study with cognitive science.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

SØREN BRIER

This article is a contribution to the development of a comprehensive interdisciplinary theory of LIS in the hope of giving a more precise evaluation of its current…

358

Abstract

This article is a contribution to the development of a comprehensive interdisciplinary theory of LIS in the hope of giving a more precise evaluation of its current problems. The article describes an interdisciplinary framework for lis, especially information retrieval (IR), in a way that goes beyond the cognitivist ‘information processing paradigm’. The main problem of this paradigm is that its concept of information and language does not deal in a systematic way with how social and cultural dynamics set the contexts that determine the meaning of those signs and words that are the basic tools for the organisation and retrieving of documents in LIS. The paradigm does not distinguish clearly enough between how the computer manipulates signs and how librarians work with meaning in practice when they design and run document mediating systems. The ‘cognitive viewpoint’ of Ingwersen and Belkin makes clear that information is not objective, but rather only potential, until it is interpreted by an individual mind with its own internal mental world view and purposes. It facilitates further study of the social pragmatic conditions for the interpretation of concepts. This approach is not yet fully developed. The domain analytic paradigm of Hjørland and Albrechtsen is a conceptual realisation of an important aspect of this area. In the present paper we make a further development of a non‐reductionistic and interdisciplinary view of information and human social communication by texts in the light of second‐order cybernetics, where information is seen as ‘a difference which makes a difference’ for a living autopoietic (self‐organised, self‐creating) system. Other key ideas are from the semiotics of Peirce and also Warner. This is the understanding of signs as a triadic relation between an object, a representation and an interpretant. Information is the interpretation of signs by living, feeling, self‐organising, biological, psychological and social systems. Signification is created and con‐trolled in a cybernetic way within social systems and is communicated through what Luhmann calls generalised media, such as science and art. The modern socio‐linguistic concept ‘discourse communities’ and Wittgenstein's ‘language game’ concept give a further pragmatic description of the self‐organising system's dynamic that determines the meaning of words in a social context. As Blair and Liebenau and Backhouse point out in their work it is these semantic fields of signification that are the true pragmatic tools of knowledge organ‐isation and document retrieval. Methodologically they are the first systems to be analysed when designing document mediating systems as they set the context for the meaning of concepts. Several practical and analytical methods from linguistics and the sociology of knowledge can be used in combination with standard methodology to reveal the significant language games behind document mediation.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Abstract

Details

Politics and the Life Sciences: The State of the Discipline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-108-4

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Elin K. Jacob

One major aspect of T.D. Wilson’s research has been his insistence on situating the investigation of information behaviour within the context of its occurrence Ö within…

Abstract

One major aspect of T.D. Wilson’s research has been his insistence on situating the investigation of information behaviour within the context of its occurrence Ö within the everyday world of work. The significance of this approach is reviewed in light of the notion of embodied cognition that characterises the evolving theoretical episteme in cognitive science research. Embodied cognition employs complex external props such as stigmergic structures and cognitive scaffoldings to reduce the cognitive burden on the individual and to augment human problem‐solving activities. The cognitive function of the classification scheme is described as exemplifying both stigmergic structures and cognitive scaffoldings. Two different but complementary approaches to the investigation of situated cognition are presented: cognition‐as‐scaffolding and cognition‐as‐infrastructure. Classification‐as‐scaffolding views the classification scheme as a knowledge storage device supporting and promoting cognitive economy. Classification‐as‐infrastructure views the classification system as a social convention that, when integrated with technological structures and organisational practices, supports knowledge management work. Both approaches are shown to build upon and extend Wilson’s contention that research is most productive when it attends to the social and organisational contexts of cognitive activity by focusing on the everyday world of work.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Ellen Bonnevie

This article presents the semantic information theory, formulated by the philosopher Fred I. Dretske, as a contribution to the discussion of metatheories and their…

7592

Abstract

This article presents the semantic information theory, formulated by the philosopher Fred I. Dretske, as a contribution to the discussion of metatheories and their practical implications in the field of library and information science. Dretske’s theory is described in Knowledge and the flow of information. It is founded on mathematical communication theory but developed and elaborated into a cognitive, functionalistic theory, is individually oriented, and deals with the content of information. The topics are: the information process from perception to cognition, and how concept formation takes place in terms of digitisation. Other important issues are the concepts of information and knowledge, truth and meaning. Semantic information theory can be used as a frame of reference in order to explain, clarify and refute concepts currently used in library and information science, and as the basis for critical reviews of elements of the cognitive viewpoint in IR, primarily the notion of “potential information”. The main contribution of the theory lies in a clarification of concepts, but there are still problems regarding the practical applications. More research is needed to combine philosophical discussions with the practice of information and library science.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Larry Wofford, Michael Troilo and Andrew Dorchester

This paper seeks to consider selected aspects of the relationship between real estate valuation, human cognition, and translational research. Its purpose is to introduce…

1706

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to consider selected aspects of the relationship between real estate valuation, human cognition, and translational research. Its purpose is to introduce the concept of cognitive risk, to propose a framework for mitigating it, and to develop a stream of translational research to transfer knowledge to real estate valuers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes an interdisciplinary conceptual approach towards the development and study of cognitive risk, and its mitigation. It proposes to broaden the study of behavioral issues in real estate valuation beyond cognitive psychology to cognitive science, and also fields such as time studies and human failure, in order to identify and mitigate cognitive risk.

Findings

The paper offers a framework as a starting‐point for handling cognitive risk. It borrows the concept of translational research from medicine to discuss how basic theoretical knowledge may be communicated to real estate valuers to improve performance.

Originality/value

The paper's concept of cognitive risk and discussion of its mitigation will enrich behavioral real estate by introducing the wisdom of other fields such as cognitive science and time studies. These fields have much to say about managing the risk surrounding human cognition, and will be of both academic and practical value to the discipline of real estate valuation.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Petros A.M. Gelepithis

The paper states that cybernetics has failed to live up to its dream as an interdisciplinary field unifying all the phenomena within the vast space of animals and…

Abstract

The paper states that cybernetics has failed to live up to its dream as an interdisciplinary field unifying all the phenomena within the vast space of animals and machines. It reminds the reader of the cybernetic dream, the related aspirations in the fields of cognitive science and social theory and the overall aim of the unity of science movement. It briefly argues that ignoring communication and adopting continuous systems as its class of systems for theory construction (CSTC) was bound to lead cybernetics to the abandonment of its dream and points out that cognitive science may well be heading the same way. A proposed conception of communication that is both rich enough to be used as a unifying theoretical construct and general enough to cut across all disciplines studying “communication”. On that basis some major implications are outlined. The paper concludes with a brief note on the impact of our conception of communication on the structure of human society.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 33 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

David E. Caughlin and Talya N. Bauer

Data visualizations in some form or another have served as decision-support tools for many centuries. In conjunction with advancements in information technology, data…

Abstract

Data visualizations in some form or another have served as decision-support tools for many centuries. In conjunction with advancements in information technology, data visualizations have become more accessible and more efficient to generate. In fact, virtually all enterprise resource planning and human resource (HR) information system vendors offer off-the-shelf data visualizations as part of decision-support dashboards as well as stand-alone images and displays for reporting. Plus, advances in programing languages and software such as Tableau, Microsoft Power BI, R, and Python have expanded the possibilities of fully customized graphics. Despite the proliferation of data visualization, relatively little is known about how to design data visualizations for displaying different types of HR data to different user groups, for different purposes, and with the overarching goal of improving the ways in which users comprehend and interpret data visualizations for decision-making purposes. To understand the state of science and practice as they relate to HR data visualizations and data visualizations in general, we review the literature on data visualizations across disciplines and offer an organizing framework that emphasizes the roles data visualization characteristics (e.g., display type, features), user characteristics (e.g., experience, individual differences), tasks, and objectives (e.g., compare values) play in user comprehension, interpretation, and decision-making. Finally, we close by proposing future directions for science and practice.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-852-0

Keywords

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