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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Ingrid Müller, Margret Buchholz and Ulrika Ferm

Current technology offers many possibilities for remote communication. Nevertheless, people with cognitive and communicative disabilities have limited access to common…

Abstract

Current technology offers many possibilities for remote communication. Nevertheless, people with cognitive and communicative disabilities have limited access to common communication technology like text messaging via a mobile phone. This study is part of the project Text messaging with picture symbols ‐ possibilities for persons with cognitive and communicative disabilities. Semi‐structured interviews were used to investigate the experience of using Windows mobiles with adapted functions for text messaging by three men and four women. The participants' opinions about the content and organisation of the project were also evaluated. All participants except one experienced increased possibilities for remote communication via text messaging. Increased participation was another relevant finding. Technical aids and interventions were individually tailored and the majority of the participants thought that Talking Mats for goal setting and repeated interviews during the project had been successful methods.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2017

David Pettinicchio and Michelle Maroto

This chapter assesses how gender and disability status intersect to shape employment and earnings outcomes for working-age adults in the United States.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter assesses how gender and disability status intersect to shape employment and earnings outcomes for working-age adults in the United States.

Methodology/approach

The research pools five years of data from the 2010–2015 Current Population Survey to compare employment and earnings outcomes for men and women with different types of physical and cognitive disabilities to those who specifically report work-limiting disabilities.

Findings

The findings show that people with different types of limitations, including those not specific to work, experienced large disparities in employment and earnings and these outcomes also varied for men and women. The multiplicative effects of gender and disability on labor market outcomes led to a hierarchy of disadvantage where women with cognitive or multiple disabilities experienced the lowest employment rates and earnings levels. However, within groups, disability presented the strongest negative effects for men, which created a smaller gender wage gap among people with disabilities.

Originality/value

This chapter provides quantitative evidence for the multiplicative effects of gender and disability status on employment and earnings. It further extends an intersectional framework by highlighting the gendered aspects of the ways in which different disabilities shape labor market inequalities. Considering multiple intersecting statuses demonstrates how the interaction between disability type and gender produce distinct labor market outcomes.

Details

Factors in Studying Employment for Persons with Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-606-8

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Hannabeth Franchino-Olsen, Hannah A. Silverstein, Nicole F. Kahn and Sandra L. Martin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the associations between minor women’ (girls’) disability status and victimization via minor sex trafficking.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the associations between minor women’ (girls’) disability status and victimization via minor sex trafficking.

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, a large, nationally-representative sample of in-school adolescents in the USA that began in 1994. The analysis included bivariate associations between physical disability status or low cognitive ability and minor sex trafficking among female survey respondents (n = 5,430).

Findings

Girls with any disability had a higher prevalence of minor sex trafficking than their peers without disabilities. Odds of minor sex trafficking were significantly higher for those with severe physical disabilities (5.83) and for those with low cognitive abilities (4.86) compared to the odds of their peers without their respective disabilities. Results for girls with mild or moderate physical disabilities were not statistically significant compared to peers without disabilities.

Social implications

These nationally-representative survey data reinforce the trends present in smaller populations and case study research: female adolescents with disabilities are at a heightened risk for sex trafficking. On both a national and global scale, the human rights gaps in policy and practice must be addressed to adequately reach, intervene and protect this vulnerable population.

Originality/value

Research about minor sex trafficking typically relies on small-scale surveys and/or convenience samples. This study used a nationally-representative survey to demonstrate the link between disability status and women’s experiences with minor sex trafficking.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Hannah Kiddle and Dave Dagnan

This paper examines how developmental risk factors associated with depression in typically developing adolescents may interact with the particular life experience of…

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499

Abstract

This paper examines how developmental risk factors associated with depression in typically developing adolescents may interact with the particular life experience of adolescents with intellectual disabilities and influence vulnerability to depression. We suggest that a consideration of developmental factors and their interaction with the person's social environment may offer a possible framework for prevention and early intervention with adolescents with intellectual disabilities.

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Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2014

Michael L. Wehmeyer, Karrie Shogren, Miguel Angel Verdugo, Laura Nota, Salvatore Soresi, Suk-Hyang Lee and Yves Lachapelle

Historically, the condition we now refer to as intellectual disability has been conceptualized using models that were extension of the medical model. Recent advances…

Abstract

Historically, the condition we now refer to as intellectual disability has been conceptualized using models that were extension of the medical model. Recent advances, however, have emphasized person-environment fit models of disability that view disability, intellectual, and other cognitive disabilities, as the lack of fit between a person’s capacities and the demands of the context. This chapter examines these shifts in conceptualization and the ways in which this changes how interventions are designed to provide support to enable people with intellectual disability to live, learn, work, and play in their communities. Such interventions and supports include issues pertaining to Universal Design for Learning, multi-tiered systems of supports, and the primacy of promoting the self-determination of people with disabilities. The importance of efforts to promote social inclusion is also discussed, as well as strategies to promote transition to adulthood. Authors from several countries provide examples of how these new intervention paradigms are being implemented across the world.

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Special Education International Perspectives: Biopsychosocial, Cultural, and Disability Aspects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-045-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Keyonda Smith and Sandra Schamroth Abrams

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issue of access to digital technology by using the lens of accessibility as set forth by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the…

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1560

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issue of access to digital technology by using the lens of accessibility as set forth by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. More specifically, this paper focuses on gamification, considers the needs of all learners, including those who identify as disabled, and raises important inquiries about equity and access to technological instructional materials.

Design/methodology/approach

Juxtaposing Kapp’s (2012) nine elements of gamification with aspects of accessibility, this paper conceptualizes the challenges and possibilities associated with gamified instructional approaches.

Findings

This paper examines gamification in light of potential barriers that exist as disabled learners navigate online courses that include one or more of the following aspects of gamification – game-based, mechanics, aesthetics, game-thinking, engage, people, motivate action, promote learning, and solve problems. Notably, online courses enhanced with gamification elements present potential access barriers and challenges to learners who identify with auditory, cognitive, neurological, physical, speech, or visual disabilities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper initiates an important discussion, and as such, it incepts additional investigations into supporting differently abled learners.

Practical implications

By examining gamification through the lens of accessibility, this paper contributes yet another perspective of teaching, learning, and instructional design.

Originality/value

In addition to socio-economic factors that may preclude one from engaging in a digital play, there is a larger question of how, if at all, gamification is accessible to learners with auditory, cognitive, neurological, physical, speech, or visual disabilities or impairments. This paper raises important questions for educators, education researchers, and game and instructional designers alike to ensure ubiquitous access to gamified digital materials in general, and online, gamified materials in particular.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2006

Carol M. Szymanski

Individuals with disabilities may not be aware of their communicative, academic, social, and/or vocational needs. Over the last 20 years, self-advocacy has been referred…

Abstract

Individuals with disabilities may not be aware of their communicative, academic, social, and/or vocational needs. Over the last 20 years, self-advocacy has been referred to as a goal for education, a civil rights movement, and a component of self-determination (Test, Fowler, Wood, Brewer, & Eddy, 2005). As a measurable skill, self-advocacy can be specifically defined as a skill that helps “individuals communicate their needs and stand up for their own interests and rights” (Yuan, 1994, p. 305). Individuals diagnosed with a variety of disabilities (learning disabilities, cognitive impairments, language disorders, etc.) experience difficulty in achieving success in situations where they are required to communicate their needs and stand up for their rights. Test et al. (2005) documented 25 definitions of self-advocacy that were published between 1977 and 2002. The most recent definition focused on self-advocacy in the realm of social change and civil rights; the enablement of individuals with disabilities to make decisions, speak for themselves, and stand up for their rights.

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Current Perspectives in Special Education Administration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-438-6

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

William E. Gustashaw and Frederick J. Brigham

Several criteria were used for this study to determine the relevance of the literature for the purpose of the review. First, all articles were required to be published in…

Abstract

Several criteria were used for this study to determine the relevance of the literature for the purpose of the review. First, all articles were required to be published in peer-reviewed journals. Next, all articles were required to be primary sources. Reviews of the literature found throughout the search procedures were used as supporting information, as well as the basis for this review. Only quantitative studies were included in this review; opinion papers and qualitative studies were not incorporated into the results. The participants in each study had to be identified as having a learning disability. Studies that included regular education students as a control or comparative group were included as long as the treatment group included students with learning disabilities. The students with learning disabilities were required to possess verbal deficits. Those studies that examined students with non-verbal learning disabilities were excluded from this review. All studies were required to be in English and conducted in the United States.

Details

Cognition and Learning in Diverse Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-353-2

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Suzanne McGowan, Hannah Martinez and Marsha Marcilla

This paper aims to illustrate the importance of a cultural shift to fully embrace and serve persons with cognitive, intellectual or physical disabilities into the library…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the importance of a cultural shift to fully embrace and serve persons with cognitive, intellectual or physical disabilities into the library community.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a combination of staff training, age- and ability-appropriate programming, accommodating service models, management-led expectations and partnerships, Anythink Libraries in Thornton, Colorado, implemented AnyAbility – a program designed especially for adults with disabilities – in April 2014.

Findings

AnyAbility’s success has led to a number of positive impacts, including increased services and collaboration, shifts in user patterns and independent visits and a more inclusive library environment in which staff have increased awareness and a stronger interaction with this population.

Originality/value

The program has transformed the lives of the staff who work at Anythink Wright Farms and the community of Anythinkers who use transformations, the AnyAbility programming has been offered at multiple Anythink locations and libraries from across the country have contacted Anythink for inspiration and advice on programs and training on this topic. Most importantly, this approach has transformed the library experience for customers, specifically adults with cognitive disabilities.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Diana Janeth Lancheros-Cuesta, Angela Carrillo-Ramos and Jaime A. Pavlich-Mariscal

This article aims to propose an adaptation algorithm that combines the analytical hierarchy process (AHP), a rule-based system, and a k-means clustering algorithm…

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1080

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to propose an adaptation algorithm that combines the analytical hierarchy process (AHP), a rule-based system, and a k-means clustering algorithm. Informatic tools are very useful to enhance the learning process in the classroom. The large variety of these tools require advanced decision-making techniques to select parameters, such as student profiles and preferences, to adjust content and information display, according to specific characteristics and necessities of students. They are part of the Kamachiy–Idukay (KI), a platform to offer adaptative educational services to students with learning difficulties or disabilities.

Design and Methodology

The design and implementation of the adaptation algorithm comprises the following phases: utilization of the AHP to determine the most important student parameters, parameter to take into account in the adaptation process, such as preferences, learning styles, performance in language, attention and memory aspects and disabilities; designing the first part of the adaptation algorithm, based on a rule-based system; designing the second part of the adaptation algorithm, based on k-means clustering; integration of the adaptation algorithm to KI; and validation of the approach in a primary school in Bogotá (Colombia).

Approach

The main approach is the application of computational techniques, namely, rule-based systems and k-means clustering, plus an AHP prioritization at design time to yield a system to support the teaching–learning process for students with disabilities or learning difficulties.

Findings

The algorithm found several groups of students with specific learning difficulties that required adapted activities. The algorithm also prioritized activities according to learning style and preferences. The results of the application of this system in a real classroom yielded positive results.

Limitations of the research

The algorithm performs adaptation for students with mild disabilities or learning difficulties (language, attention and memory). The algorithm does not address severe disabilities that could greatly affect cognitive abilities.

Contributions

The main contribution of this paper is an adaptation algorithm with the following distinctive characteristics, namely, designed utilizing the AHP, which ensures a proper prioritization of the student characteristics in the adaptation process, and utilizes a rule-based system to identify different adaptation scenarios and k-means clustering to group students with similar adaptation requirements.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

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