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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2013

Darren Good, Bauback Yeganeh and Robin Yeganeh

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most…

Abstract

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most scientifically supported psychological modality. CBT like other practices has been used in coaching as cognitive behavioral coaching but rarely discussed more explicitly for the executive population. Here, we offer a specific adaptation – cognitive behavioral executive coaching (CBEC) – and suggest that it presents a flexible structure that can meet the multiple agendas that are framed for executive coaching. Additionally, the core features of CBT and CBEC in particular satisfy the major needs of executives in coaching arrangements. We conclude by demonstrating a CBEC process model for coaching the high-performing executive.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-891-4

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Philip Hyland and Daniel Boduszek

The field of cognitive-behavioural therapy contains many different theoretical models of psychopathology, with each discipline ascribing greater emphasis to a particular…

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Abstract

Purpose

The field of cognitive-behavioural therapy contains many different theoretical models of psychopathology, with each discipline ascribing greater emphasis to a particular cognitive process or organisation of beliefs. This paper seeks to propose a method of integrating the two most widely practiced and researched schools of CBT; Beck ' s cognitive therapy (CT) and Ellis ' s rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT).

Design/methodology/approach

Although there exist a large degree of similarity between the two therapeutic approaches, the two models do differ in relation to their respective hypothesises regarding the core psychological variable in psychopathology. Cognitive theory hypothesises that negative representational beliefs are of central importance whereas rational emotive behaviour theory hypothesises that negative evaluative demands lie at the core of psychological disturbance. This paper evaluates these competing predictions on the basis of the available empirical literature.

Results

The empirical literature provides greater support for the organisation and interrelations of the irrational beliefs proposed by REBT theory over CT theory, however the research data clearly indicate the importance of the cognitive variables stressed by CT theory in the pathogenesis of psychological distress. Based on the available evidence an integrated CBT model which incorporates elements of both CT and REBT theory is presented. It is proposed that this integrated model can serve as the stepping-stone toward a larger, single, coherent CBT model of psychopathology.

Research limitations/implications

Few empirical studies have directly compared the competing predictions of CT and REBT theory. If future research supports the findings presented in this paper, the proposed model can serve as a template for the development of a unified, general-CBT theory of psychopathology.

Practical implications

The integrated model presented in this paper can serve as a guiding theoretical model for therapeutic practice which takes into account therapeutic methods from both CT and REBT.

Originality/value

This paper proposes the first theoretical model which incorporates the competing theoretical conceptualizations of psychological distress from the two main schools of CBT.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Paul Willner

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is being used increasingly with people with learning disabilities. The evidence base to support these developments comes from…

Abstract

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is being used increasingly with people with learning disabilities. The evidence base to support these developments comes from uncontrolled trials of CBT in a variety of psychological disorders and eight to nine controlled trials of CBT for anger (plus a single controlled study in depression). This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of group‐based anger management and the acquisition of anger coping skills, and the effectiveness of individual anger treatment, with some discussion of the status of CBT for other indications and the difficulties of conducting outcome research in this area.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Stephen Oathamshaw

This case study describes an attempt to use cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to treat anger problems in a young man with mild learning disabilities. The skills…

223

Abstract

This case study describes an attempt to use cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to treat anger problems in a young man with mild learning disabilities. The skills necessary to engage in CBT were assessed in addition to an assessment of support available, motivation to engage in therapy and belief in ability to make changes. Despite this assessment environmental factors undermined the therapy, which was not completed. Some of the difficulties and dilemmas involved in delivering CBT in ‘ordinary’ community services are discussed, concluding with learning points for consideration by other practitioners.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Joe Curran, Paul Lawson, Simon Houghton and Kevin Gournay

Behavioural activation is a contemporary behavioural treatment for depression that has the potential advantages of being more readily adopted in psychiatric inpatient…

250

Abstract

Behavioural activation is a contemporary behavioural treatment for depression that has the potential advantages of being more readily adopted in psychiatric inpatient environments than more complex psychological treatment approaches and requiring less intensive training than these approaches. In this article the theoretical and empirical foundations of behavioural activation are described along with an outline of the therapeutic process and key interventions used. Consideration is then given to factors influencing the implementation of BA in psychiatric inpatient environments.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Mauro Leoni, Serafino Corti and Roberto Cavagnola

The purpose of this paper is mainly to present a general review of third generation cognitive-behavioural therapies (CBTs), and to debate whether these approaches are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is mainly to present a general review of third generation cognitive-behavioural therapies (CBTs), and to debate whether these approaches are applicable to persons with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD).

Design/methodology/approach

Despite the lack of consistent literature focused on this population, the authors have considered the available general literature on the third generation of CBTs and analysed core issues of the processes within the context of intellectual disabilities and Autism spectrum disorder.

Findings

The evidence from typical developing population studies and the emerging literature specific to people with NDD is convincing, but there is a need for studies exploring how and when these therapeutic approaches can be applicable. Two behavioural approaches of third generation therapies – acceptance and commitment therapy and mindfulness-based CBT – appear to have the most potential to be adapted for robust intervention for the broad spectrum of persons with NDD.

Research limitations/implications

The number of studies and methodologies applied are a clear limitation and the present paper is only exploratory.

Originality/value

The paper supports clinicians to use the emerging protocols, and to replicate and implement procedures and techniques.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Peter E. Langdon

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “The use of cognitive-behaviour therapy to treat depression in people with learning disabilities: a systematic review”.

274

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “The use of cognitive-behaviour therapy to treat depression in people with learning disabilities: a systematic review”.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the literature, as well as both clinical and research experience, some reasons are outlined for the lack of attention given to psychological therapies to treat depression amongst people with intellectual disabilities (IDs).

Findings

More research is needed, but existing evidence is promising regarding the effectiveness of adapted cognitive-behaviour therapy for depression amongst people with IDs.

Originality/value

The commentary draws attention to the scope for developing a range of effective cognitive, behavioural and cognitive-behavioural treatments.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Amanda Bishop and Jayne Henry

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several…

Abstract

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several years of offence‐related work, identification of chronic low self‐esteem provided an alternative approach to addressing the risk of violence by treatment based on the cognitive model of low self‐esteem. Global self‐esteem and fear of negative evaluation were assessed at baseline, middle and end of treatment and at one‐month follow‐up. Although scores improved over the course of 23 sessions and were maintained at one‐month follow‐up, the change was minimal and unlikely to be clinically significant. However, the client reported benefits from therapy and there were observable positive behaviour changes. Discharge was facilitated from secure services to supported living in the community. The results from this case study show that, with adaptation, cognitive behavioural therapy for low self‐esteem may successfully be applied to people with mild learning disabilities. Therapy to address issues underlying offending behaviour is often required in addition to offending behaviour programmes in order to reduce risk of re‐offending.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2022

Amie Robinson and Nima Moghaddam

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological treatments and identify required adaptations to increase acceptability and improve outcomes for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological treatments and identify required adaptations to increase acceptability and improve outcomes for people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment who experience psychological distress.

Design/methodology/approach

The Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialised Register and other databases were searched for eligible studies. Inclusion criteria identified nine randomised controlled trials comparing a psychological intervention (cognitive behavioural therapy, relaxation training therapies, multimodal therapies, psychodynamic therapy, counselling and cognitive rehabilitation) with usual care, with measures of depression and/or anxiety as an outcome. The appraisal of papers was conducted using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Data was analysed using meta-analysis.

Findings

A small, significant effect size before to after intervention was revealed, suggesting that psychological treatments may be effective in reducing psychological distress in people with dementia, with several therapy adaptations identified.

Research limitations/implications

Because of methodological limitations and a small number of studies evaluated, the quality of evidence was low for outcomes for depression, and there were no significant outcomes in anxiety.

Originality/value

The current review offers a unique contribution in identifying specific adaptations deemed helpful in improving the accessibility and acceptability of therapy for people with dementia, suggesting therapy can be adjusted enough to support this client-group. Future studies should use high-quality trials using standardised psychological interventions, of sufficient length, with long-term follow-up and offer of specific adaptations to increase accessibility and outcomes.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Radha R. Sharma and Sir Cary Cooper

Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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