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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Philip Hyland and Daniel Boduszek

The field of cognitive-behavioural therapy contains many different theoretical models of psychopathology, with each discipline ascribing greater emphasis to a particular…

2803

Abstract

Purpose

The field of cognitive-behavioural therapy contains many different theoretical models of psychopathology, with each discipline ascribing greater emphasis to a particular cognitive process or organisation of beliefs. This paper seeks to propose a method of integrating the two most widely practiced and researched schools of CBT; Beck ' s cognitive therapy (CT) and Ellis ' s rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT).

Design/methodology/approach

Although there exist a large degree of similarity between the two therapeutic approaches, the two models do differ in relation to their respective hypothesises regarding the core psychological variable in psychopathology. Cognitive theory hypothesises that negative representational beliefs are of central importance whereas rational emotive behaviour theory hypothesises that negative evaluative demands lie at the core of psychological disturbance. This paper evaluates these competing predictions on the basis of the available empirical literature.

Results

The empirical literature provides greater support for the organisation and interrelations of the irrational beliefs proposed by REBT theory over CT theory, however the research data clearly indicate the importance of the cognitive variables stressed by CT theory in the pathogenesis of psychological distress. Based on the available evidence an integrated CBT model which incorporates elements of both CT and REBT theory is presented. It is proposed that this integrated model can serve as the stepping-stone toward a larger, single, coherent CBT model of psychopathology.

Research limitations/implications

Few empirical studies have directly compared the competing predictions of CT and REBT theory. If future research supports the findings presented in this paper, the proposed model can serve as a template for the development of a unified, general-CBT theory of psychopathology.

Practical implications

The integrated model presented in this paper can serve as a guiding theoretical model for therapeutic practice which takes into account therapeutic methods from both CT and REBT.

Originality/value

This paper proposes the first theoretical model which incorporates the competing theoretical conceptualizations of psychological distress from the two main schools of CBT.

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2013

Darren Good, Bauback Yeganeh and Robin Yeganeh

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most…

Abstract

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most scientifically supported psychological modality. CBT like other practices has been used in coaching as cognitive behavioral coaching but rarely discussed more explicitly for the executive population. Here, we offer a specific adaptation – cognitive behavioral executive coaching (CBEC) – and suggest that it presents a flexible structure that can meet the multiple agendas that are framed for executive coaching. Additionally, the core features of CBT and CBEC in particular satisfy the major needs of executives in coaching arrangements. We conclude by demonstrating a CBEC process model for coaching the high-performing executive.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-891-4

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Amanda Bishop and Jayne Henry

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several…

Abstract

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several years of offence‐related work, identification of chronic low self‐esteem provided an alternative approach to addressing the risk of violence by treatment based on the cognitive model of low self‐esteem. Global self‐esteem and fear of negative evaluation were assessed at baseline, middle and end of treatment and at one‐month follow‐up. Although scores improved over the course of 23 sessions and were maintained at one‐month follow‐up, the change was minimal and unlikely to be clinically significant. However, the client reported benefits from therapy and there were observable positive behaviour changes. Discharge was facilitated from secure services to supported living in the community. The results from this case study show that, with adaptation, cognitive behavioural therapy for low self‐esteem may successfully be applied to people with mild learning disabilities. Therapy to address issues underlying offending behaviour is often required in addition to offending behaviour programmes in order to reduce risk of re‐offending.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Stephen Oathamshaw

This case study describes an attempt to use cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to treat anger problems in a young man with mild learning disabilities. The skills…

221

Abstract

This case study describes an attempt to use cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to treat anger problems in a young man with mild learning disabilities. The skills necessary to engage in CBT were assessed in addition to an assessment of support available, motivation to engage in therapy and belief in ability to make changes. Despite this assessment environmental factors undermined the therapy, which was not completed. Some of the difficulties and dilemmas involved in delivering CBT in ‘ordinary’ community services are discussed, concluding with learning points for consideration by other practitioners.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Radha R. Sharma and Sir Cary Cooper

Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Pat Frankish and Sue Terry

This paper summarises the main areas of therapeutic developments in recent years in the field of learning disability. There has been a growing interest in alternative ways…

Abstract

This paper summarises the main areas of therapeutic developments in recent years in the field of learning disability. There has been a growing interest in alternative ways of helping learning‐disabled people live with themselves and the world in a socially acceptable way. Most such approaches are person‐centred, even if provided in a group setting. The range and types of therapies are illustrated and the advances in humanistic approaches highlighted. Cognitive, psychodynamic and creative therapies have been added to behaviour therapy, with good results, indicating the potential of learning‐disabled people to benefit from the same sorts of therapy as other people.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Stuart Wix

A forensic service in Pueblo, Colorado, USA has successfully introduced a dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) model of cognitive behavioural therapy which has been an…

Abstract

A forensic service in Pueblo, Colorado, USA has successfully introduced a dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) model of cognitive behavioural therapy which has been an integral part of the therapeutic programme since the mid‐1990s. The introduction of DBT to a forensic patient population has resulted in improvement of service user involvement with therapy, a possible solution to addressing staff burn‐out and a potential mode of treatment to encompass a range of diagnostic categories.DBT is a psychological intervention to help change an individual's distorted cognitions and assist the development of coping strategies. The emphasis of DBT in this instance is upon treating life‐threatening behaviour exhibited by patients in a forensic setting. A quasi‐experimental study comparing DBT with treatment as usual, conducted over a 20‐month period, helped this service to validate the therapy as an appropriate form of treatment for this patient population.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

M Ferriter, E Kaltenthaler, G Parry and C Beverley

Phobias and panic disorder are commonly treated within primary care settings. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a recommended treatment for these disorders but access…

Abstract

Phobias and panic disorder are commonly treated within primary care settings. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a recommended treatment for these disorders but access is limited due to too few therapists, expense and patients' reluctance to enter therapy. Computerised CBT (CCBT) is a self‐help option designed to offer patients the potential benefits of CBT with less therapist involvement. The review described here sought to identify studies evaluating the effectiveness of CCBT for phobias and panic disorders.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Jon Taylor

People with learning disabilities have traditionally been denied access to a range of psychological therapies. Similarly, offenders with learning disabilities…

Abstract

People with learning disabilities have traditionally been denied access to a range of psychological therapies. Similarly, offenders with learning disabilities, particularly in prison settings, have largely been unable to access treatment strategies that are provided for offenders who do not have such disabilities. As a consequence these individuals are denied the opportunity to address their criminogenic needs and/or attend to their psychological welfare. This paper provides a brief exploration of the reasons and evidence for such practice, alongside the evidence that people with learning disabilities can successfully engage in psychotherapy. It is concluded that there is no evidence that would support the exclusion of people with disabilities from treatment options.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Peter E. Langdon

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “The use of cognitive-behaviour therapy to treat depression in people with learning disabilities: a systematic review”.

272

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “The use of cognitive-behaviour therapy to treat depression in people with learning disabilities: a systematic review”.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the literature, as well as both clinical and research experience, some reasons are outlined for the lack of attention given to psychological therapies to treat depression amongst people with intellectual disabilities (IDs).

Findings

More research is needed, but existing evidence is promising regarding the effectiveness of adapted cognitive-behaviour therapy for depression amongst people with IDs.

Originality/value

The commentary draws attention to the scope for developing a range of effective cognitive, behavioural and cognitive-behavioural treatments.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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