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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Talat Islam, Ishfaq Ahmed, Ghulam Ali and Zeshan Ahmer

The global increase in coffee consumption has increased competition among cafes, generating the need to find ways of increasing customers’ revisit. Considering this…

Abstract

Purpose

The global increase in coffee consumption has increased competition among cafes, generating the need to find ways of increasing customers’ revisit. Considering this backdrop, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of authenticity, interpersonal justice and prior experience on customer’s revisit intention, taking involvement as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected from 489 customers between April and July 2018 from an emerging coffee market. The customers were approached on a convenience basis and a questionnaire-based survey method was used to collect responses.

Findings

The data were analyzed using a two-stage structural equation modeling technique. The study noted authenticity, interpersonal justice and prior experience to not only have a direct impact on revisit intention but also having an indirect impact through involvement.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional in nature, which is the foremost limitation of the study. Findings of the study reveal some unexplored dimensions of managing customers’ revisit intention, thus leaving a valuable message for the management of coffee cafes.

Originality/value

This study highlights the importance of authenticity, interpersonal justice, prior experience and involvement with respect to the revisit intention of the customers, as literature is scant on these variables.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Ishfaq Ahmed, Talat Islam, Siti Zaleha Abdul Rasid, Farooq Anwar and Arooj Khalid

In the realm of increased competition among coffee café, the need for customer citizenship behavior (CCB) has increased. But the question of how a café can win CCB through…

Abstract

Purpose

In the realm of increased competition among coffee café, the need for customer citizenship behavior (CCB) has increased. But the question of how a café can win CCB through firm-level and individual dispositional factors have not been gained due attention. Against this backdrop, this study aims to investigate a moderated-mediation model to predict CCB through CSR, affective commitment and service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 797 coffee café visitors between April–June 2019. The respondents were approached through a convenience sampling technique.

Findings

Using both Structural Equation Modeling and Hayes Macros, data analysis proved that CSR significantly predicts affective commitment and CCB. Moreover, it is also witnessed that the presence of high service quality strengthens the mediation mechanism; thus, a moderated-mediation model is supported.

Research limitations/implications

The study is cross-sectional, although the design did not cause a common method variance. The model tested in the study offers a novel mechanism explaining the linking between CSR and CCB through affective commitment and service quality. The findings are useful for the management of café as the large sample size may offer generalizable results.

Originality/value

The study offers a novel way of predicting CCB, the desired customer behavior in the present competitive environment in the coffee market. The usefulness of the findings for management is yet another contribution offered by this study.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

James Love

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous…

Abstract

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous literature has emerged embracing debates on the domestic consequences and on the causes of export instability. The purpose here is to examine these debates and an attempt is made to set out different theoretical stances, to classify and examine empirical findings, and to indicate the directions in which the debates have moved. Such a statement of a review article's purpose is, of course, incomplete without more specific delineation of the boundaries within which the general objectives are pursued. Here that delineation has three facets.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Abstract

Details

Modelling the Riskiness in Country Risk Ratings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-837-8

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Ishfaq Ahmed, Talat Islam, Saima Ahmad and Ahmad Kaleem

The issue of customer mistreatment in food and retail sectors has come under the spotlight during the COVID-19 crisis. The purpose of this paper is to examine the problem…

Abstract

Purpose

The issue of customer mistreatment in food and retail sectors has come under the spotlight during the COVID-19 crisis. The purpose of this paper is to examine the problem in the COVID-19 pandemic context and study its implications for employee counterproductive behavior in the workplace. Specifically, this study aims to investigate the relationship between customer mistreatment and employee counterproductive behavior by considering the mediating role of cognitive rumination and moderating role of servant leadership at coffee cafés that operated during the COVID-19 smart lockdown period.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaires were distributed to 479 frontline staff working at cafés and coffee shops located in two large cities of Pakistan. The questionnaire data were analyzed by using bootstrapped regression procedures to determine how the investigated variables influenced counterproductive work behavior during the pandemic.

Findings

The findings revealed a positive influence of customer mistreatment on counterproductive work behavior both directly as well as indirectly in the presence of employee rumination as a mediator. Furthermore, the presence of servant leadership at cafés and coffee shops was found to moderate the impact of customer mistreatment during the pandemic.

Originality/value

The study offers a novel insight into the relationships between mistreatment by customers, counterproductive work behavior, employee rumination and servant leadership in the COVID-19 pandemic context, hitherto unexplored.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Pierre McDonagh

This inquiry examines the challenge for marketers to foster both anti‐slavery and fair trade. Analyzes communicative work to enhance both. Describes underlying issues and…

Abstract

This inquiry examines the challenge for marketers to foster both anti‐slavery and fair trade. Analyzes communicative work to enhance both. Describes underlying issues and public misunderstanding; draws on specific themes by illustrating the Anti‐Slavery International campaigns to end child labour via the Rugmark label, and the work of a fair trade coffee company, Cafédirect Ltd; and furnishes a link between societal marketing and the emergent theory of sustainable communication to effect anti‐slavery and global fair trade. Concludes with a discussion, implications for societal marketing and suggestions for further research.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Ahmad Jamal

An estimated 52% of Pakistan’s population is under the age of 25, and like their counterparts elsewhere around the globe, Generation Z in Pakistan was born into a world…

Abstract

An estimated 52% of Pakistan’s population is under the age of 25, and like their counterparts elsewhere around the globe, Generation Z in Pakistan was born into a world overrun with technology, Internet, and social media. This generation of consumers possess information processing ability that is much faster than any other generation. Generation Z consumers in Pakistan are active users of social media platforms connecting with local and international users, brands and exchanging information, photos, videos, ideas, and opinions with people inside and outside Pakistan. To develop insights into the consumption patterns, preferences, attitudes, and preferences of this segment of consumers, this chapter provides an overview of cultural and social values underpinning consumption choices and social media preferences. The chapter identifies and discusses the dynamic nature of Generation Z in Pakistan by identifying some of its defining features: the generation consists of confident, able, and multilingual consumers who are largely collectivists in orientation but shows strong individualistic tendencies. Such consumers have a global outlook and actively seek engagement with brands via digital platforms and influencer marketers expecting authenticity, respect, and equality. The chapter discusses work-related implications such as the need for providing transformational leadership and training programs to harness the intellectual skills of Generation Z in Pakistan. The chapter concludes by identifying and discussing issues relevant to handling Generation consumers in Pakistan including effective marketing strategies.

Details

The New Generation Z in Asia: Dynamics, Differences, Digitalisation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-221-5

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 22 June 2017

Muhammad Kashif, Michela Mingione and Muhammad Fawad Noori

Marketing of Services, Brand Management.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing of Services, Brand Management.

Study level/applicability

Graduate (MBA), Services Marketing Course.

Case overview

The case highlights growth challenges faced by a fast food brand named Peri-Peri Original in a developing country context of Pakistan. The major presence of the brand is in two major cities of Pakistan – Karachi and Lahore where mostly youth and families are the target markets of this brand. However, there is no unique element in the minds of the target market because the brand faces a differentiation challenge in the realm of strong global competition from McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC). The management team at Peri-Peri has several environmental challenges to face as well. Internally, the brand is confused with its close competitor Nando’s as people perceive these two brands as the same. Second, there is growing concern among social activist groups and families in Pakistan that fast food consumption is causing diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and obesity among children. On the contrary, the global fast food chains especially McDonald’s and KFC are on top of the mind in the consideration set. With these challenges and concerns in mind, the brand team has two options on the table. One is to geographically extend the brand to other cities whereas the other option is to use the same outlets and dedicate a portion to the kids’ market segment to increase product variety and ultimately the store traffic. It is noticeable that the brand has a reputation of excellence in service quality; the employees are motivated and Peri-Peri have retained their staff over a period of time. Furthermore, the brand is a small scale restaurant with only limited budget and focused product mix which is its core spirit of branding – the chicken grilled in Mozambican sauces and a service attitude which no one can demonstrate; in a way, Peri-Peri is approaching to grow its brand equity.

Expected learning outcomes

To understand the brand positioning of developing countries’ organizations facing a growth challenge in a service environment. To understand the concept and application of Services Tangibility spectrum. To understand the decision-making process managers have to face when dealing with brand extension decisions.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Agricultural Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-481-3

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Farah Naz Baig

Marketing, retail management and new product launch.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing, retail management and new product launch.

Study level/applicability

BBA final year students, MBA first year students.

Case overview

The case is about the decision that needs to be taken for breakfast launch by McDonald's Pakistan. It was mid July 2011, when Jamil Husain, marketing manager, Atif Abbass and Ali Raza. Marketing executives were sitting in the meeting room of Lakson Square building, Karachi, in order to discuss the fate of breakfast menu. It was Jamil's idea to launch the breakfast menu in the Pakistani market. He, however, was unable to convince his team members who thought that the market was not ready to accept the breakfast option since there was a huge difference between Pakistani lifestyle and western lifestyle. Jamil presented his arguments before them but all in vain. Somehow he knew that the same arguments if presented in front of the top management would lead to a “No” situation. Just then the phone rang; it was Caroline, company secretary, confirming the meeting date and venue which was supposed to take place after two days.

Expected learning outcomes

The learning outcomes should be: organizations need to understand the cultural differences and decide about the product launches; based on the class discussion the instructor can conclude whether launching would be a good option or not – apart from culture what are the other important considerations; and preference of glocal vs global – in what situations might a glocal strategy be more suitable as compared with global.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available, please consult your librarian to access.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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