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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Talat Islam, Ishfaq Ahmed, Ghulam Ali and Zeshan Ahmer

The global increase in coffee consumption has increased competition among cafes, generating the need to find ways of increasing customers’ revisit. Considering this…

Abstract

Purpose

The global increase in coffee consumption has increased competition among cafes, generating the need to find ways of increasing customers’ revisit. Considering this backdrop, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of authenticity, interpersonal justice and prior experience on customer’s revisit intention, taking involvement as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected from 489 customers between April and July 2018 from an emerging coffee market. The customers were approached on a convenience basis and a questionnaire-based survey method was used to collect responses.

Findings

The data were analyzed using a two-stage structural equation modeling technique. The study noted authenticity, interpersonal justice and prior experience to not only have a direct impact on revisit intention but also having an indirect impact through involvement.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional in nature, which is the foremost limitation of the study. Findings of the study reveal some unexplored dimensions of managing customers’ revisit intention, thus leaving a valuable message for the management of coffee cafes.

Originality/value

This study highlights the importance of authenticity, interpersonal justice, prior experience and involvement with respect to the revisit intention of the customers, as literature is scant on these variables.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Shang-Ho Yang, Ping Qing, Wuyang Hu and Yun Liu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Chinese consumers’ willingness-to-pay (WTP) for fair trade coffee given different amount of product information. Although coffee

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Chinese consumers’ willingness-to-pay (WTP) for fair trade coffee given different amount of product information. Although coffee is becoming more popular in China, the concept of fair trade is often found unfamiliar to most Chinese consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 564 consumers were interviewed in Hubei, China. The key survey question asked consumers’ willingness to purchase a cup of fair trade coffee compared to a traditional cup of coffee. A modified payment card approach was used to elicit WTP. Before answering the purchase question, respondents were randomly assigned to one of three different information scenarios: basic definition, impact on sustainability and the environment, and information including both environmental and social implications.

Findings

Results indicated that consumers were generally willing to pay additional amount for fair trade coffee. Information played an important role in determining what types of consumers were responsive to fair trade coffee. Furthermore, the amount of information provided and consumer WTP did not follow a linear relationship.

Practical implications

Results obtained in this study are useful for coffee marketers to better target their promotion strategies.

Originality/value

In contrast to China's fast growing coffee market, little is known about consumer preferences and far less on fair trade coffee. This study is the first of its kind to understand Chinese consumers’ preferences for coffee in general and for fair trade coffee in specific.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Juan Aguirre

The purpose of this paper is to identify what type of changes, if any, have taken place, in the factors influencing coffee consumption among Costa Rican university students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify what type of changes, if any, have taken place, in the factors influencing coffee consumption among Costa Rican university students.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consisted of quantitative and qualitative phases. The quantitative data were collected through a written questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 370 students at a private university. The data were analyzed using Cronbach’s α, principal component/exploratory factor analysis and standardized ordinal logistic regression. Qualitative in-depth interviews with ten students were undertaken to verify the quantitative results.

Findings

Of the sample, 70 percent were females and 30 percent males. Of those interviewed, 70 percent drank coffee and 30 percent did not. In 64 percent of those who did not drink coffee, juice was the main substitute. The predictors of the coffee culture are: the country tradition, parents, general socialization with friends, home, workplace and restaurants. Tradition, parents and home were found to be the predictors of coffee culture for women; for men the predictors were the workplace and restaurants.

Originality/value

Coffee culture amongst university students is experiencing a transition, and the changes identified seem to be affected by the gender of the student and the change in the economic base of the country. The information will be valuable in marketing coffee to young people.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Jihad Mohammad and Farzana Quoquab

Over the last three decades, corporate social responsibility (CSR) has evolved significantly as a worldwide trend in both the management literature and the modern economy…

Abstract

Over the last three decades, corporate social responsibility (CSR) has evolved significantly as a worldwide trend in both the management literature and the modern economy. However, it is still at its infancy stage in the developing countries like Malaysia. It is more prevalent in the coffee industry, due to the challenges that this industry encounters. In addition, not much information is available in the academic literature in order to understand these challenges that this industry is facing in performing CSR. Therefore, this chapter aims to highlight the main challenges that the coffee franchise industry faces in incorporating the activities of CSR in their operations. Lack of top management support, performing CSR in isolation, and lack of capable employees to do CSR are some of the major challenges. This chapter is expected to advance the knowledge about CSR practices and challenges in the Malaysian context.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Thomas V. Greer and Michael J. Chattalas

Coffee is the developing world′s largest export after oil, andcoffee revenues are vital to many nations. However, growth prospects forconsumption of this critically…

Abstract

Coffee is the developing world′s largest export after oil, and coffee revenues are vital to many nations. However, growth prospects for consumption of this critically important commodity are not encouraging on a global basis and are discouraging in the US where volume is on a long‐term decline. The Promotion Fund of the International Coffee Agreement attempts to encourage consumption. The fund is financially supported by coffee producing countries that have signed the International Coffee Agreement. In light of objectives to assist developing nations and help these nations to help themselves, it is important to understand the operations of the Fund. The Promotion Fund of the International Coffee Agreement may serve as a skeletal model for the development of similar agreements for other products significant to the developing world.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Chaturong Napathorn

The purpose of this paper primarily contributes to the social enterprises and human resource management (HRM) literature by examining the roles of founders in shaping how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper primarily contributes to the social enterprises and human resource management (HRM) literature by examining the roles of founders in shaping how workers in social enterprises are managed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a cross-case analysis of three social enterprises in the food and agricultural products and food and beverage industries in Thailand. The case study evidence in this paper draws on semi-structured interviews with each social enterprise’s founders, managers and employees; field visits to each social enterprise in Bangkok and other provinces in Thailand; and a review of archival documents and web-based reports and resources. This paper uses thematic analysis to pinpoint, examine and record the patterns or themes found in the data.

Findings

This paper proposes that the founders of social enterprises play a variety of roles in shaping the human resource (HR) systems and practices used in these enterprises. First, founders serve as role models for managers and employees of social enterprises. Second, founders serve as succession planners for social enterprises. Third, the founders serve as builders and enforcers of corporate culture in social enterprises. Finally, founders serve as builders and enforcers of the HR systems and practices used in these enterprises. Put simply, without the roles of founders, the corporate culture and HR systems and practices of social enterprises might not be sustainable over time.

Research limitations/implications

Because this research is based on case studies of three social enterprises located in Thailand, the findings may not be generalizable to all other social enterprises across countries. Rather, the aim of this paper is to further the discussion regarding the roles of founders in shaping the HR systems and practices used in social enterprises. Another limitation of this research is that it does not include social enterprises in several other industries, including the entertainment and media, printing and publishing and hotel and restaurant industries. Future research may explore how the founders of social enterprises in other industries shape the HR systems and practices used in those enterprises. Moreover, quantitative studies using large samples of social enterprises across industries might also be useful in deepening the understanding of a topic that is important from the perspectives of both social enterprises and HRM.

Practical implications

This paper has practical implications for founders and/or top managers of social enterprises is not only Thailand but also other countries. It also has social/policy implications for the government and/or relevant public agencies in Thailand and for several other developing countries/emerging market economies.

Originality/value

Very little research has examined the various roles of founders in shaping how workers in social enterprises are managed. In addition, there has been relatively little research focusing on the characteristics of social enterprises’ founders in developing countries, including Thailand. This paper aims to fill this gap in the literature on social enterprises and HRM regarding how the founders of small, hybrid organizations such as social enterprises in Thailand play their roles as builders and enforcers of HR systems and practices and other roles relevant to the management of workers.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

James Love

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous…

Abstract

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous literature has emerged embracing debates on the domestic consequences and on the causes of export instability. The purpose here is to examine these debates and an attempt is made to set out different theoretical stances, to classify and examine empirical findings, and to indicate the directions in which the debates have moved. Such a statement of a review article's purpose is, of course, incomplete without more specific delineation of the boundaries within which the general objectives are pursued. Here that delineation has three facets.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2020

Krisley Mendes and André Luchine

This study aims to identify and classified non-tariff measures (NTMs) on Brazilian imports of robusta coffee beans, calculated a tariff-equivalent of non-tariff barriers…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and classified non-tariff measures (NTMs) on Brazilian imports of robusta coffee beans, calculated a tariff-equivalent of non-tariff barriers (NTBs) and assessed the effects of removing NTBs from upstream and downstream domestic instant coffee supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis uses documentary research to identify NTMs and the price-wedge method is applied to estimate a tariff-equivalent. The effects of suppressing the tariff-equivalent were evaluated using a partial equilibrium model with constant elasticity of substitution (Armington, 1969) and by incorporating vertical integration and uncertainty (Hallren and Opanasets, 2018).

Findings

The results show that NTMs seemingly hinder the entrance of coffee beans into the domestic market. The tariff-equivalent was estimated at 13.61%. Suppressing it reveals that the share of domestic coffee beans used to produce domestic instant coffee falls 0.21 p.p. while the share of domestic instant coffee consumed by the international trade rises 8.60 p.p.

Originality/value

What makes this paper original is that this paper investigated the effects of NTMs in a developing country, namely, Brazil. Although Brazil is one of the largest agricultural producers in the world, it has not appeared in literature in this type of analysis until now. Furthermore, it contributes to the literature on using existing techniques to investigate the impact of NTM removal on individual products in a specific country, in contrast to more recent papers that discuss using multi-country and multi-product data sets at the HTS-6 level. Thus, this paper demonstrates how a case study approach can be useful in quantifying policy changes.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Rong Zhu, Sunny Li Sun and Ying Huang

Initiated by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) over half a century ago, fair trade has successfully evolved from a regional business discourse to a global social…

Abstract

Purpose

Initiated by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) over half a century ago, fair trade has successfully evolved from a regional business discourse to a global social movement within international trade. In the matter of fair trade coffee, this global social movement has transformed the traditional coffee trade structure of inequality and unfairness into a conglomerate of international institutions that embrace equity and inclusivity – a metamorphosis that can be attributed to NGOs’ institutional entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

In this exploratory study, the authors examine the fair trade coffee industry and trace the actions of NGOs along with other stakeholders at the organizational field level, in moving toward an inclusive model of globalization.

Findings

Departing from exploitative globalization, fair trade practices advocate inclusive growth through the promotion and establishment of greater equity for all as well as higher environmental standards in global value chains.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to nascent research on inclusive growth by analyzing how fair trade promotes inclusive growth and trade in GVCs. This study also contributes to research on institutional entrepreneurship by examining two enabling conditions – the shift in institutional logics and the peripheral social position of NGOs – that enabled NGOs to serve as institutional entrepreneurs in the initiation phase of institutional entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

Policymakers may encourage collaboration between profit organizations and nonprofit organizations to provide entrepreneurial opportunities for trials, errors, and revisions. The evolution of fair trade coffee provides such an example.

Social implications

The coevolution of NGOs and MNEs has made the globalization of fair trade practices possible. The collaboration between NGOs as institutional entrepreneurs (operating on the community logic) and MNEs as institutional followers (operating on the financial logic) support inclusive globalization and sustain fair trade practices.

Originality/value

Drawing on the process model of institutional entrepreneurship, the authors seek to understand the role of NGOs as institutional entrepreneurs in the dynamics of initiating, diffusing and sustaining fair trade coffee practices.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Maria‐Alejandra Gonzalez‐Perez and Santiago Gutierrez‐Viana

The purpose of this paper is to present a cross‐country study comparing Colombia and Vietnam, two of the major coffee exporting countries in the world, in terms of their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a cross‐country study comparing Colombia and Vietnam, two of the major coffee exporting countries in the world, in terms of their infrastructures, the roles of external shocks, technology adoption at different stages of production, added value, positioning in both domestic and global markets, internationalisation patterns, marketing and branding innovations, regulatory frameworks, and policy environments. This study also explores other aspects linked to production, and marketing strategies that open niche markets such as speciality coffees, and socially‐, labour‐ and environmentally‐responsible trade. Furthermore, it identifies opportunities of cooperation and competition between these two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using value chain analysis as primary research method, this paper identifies links and dynamics in the value chains that have been developed in the coffee industry in both countries to improve competitiveness, increase sustainability, and respond to market demands.

Findings

Using value chain analysis, it was found that Colombia and Vietnam produce different types of coffee, and that both have implemented diverse strategies in order to be more competitive in domestic and foreign markets via product differentiation. These differences make explicit room for cooperation between these two countries in an international environment where fierce competition persists.

Originality/value

Cooperation between producing countries is an under‐researched subject. These findings will be useful both for policy makers in coffee‐producing countries and agribusiness researchers.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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