Search results

1 – 10 of over 111000
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2022

Guangzhen Wu

This study aims to examine disparities in the code of silence between rural and urban police officers in China.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine disparities in the code of silence between rural and urban police officers in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a national police university in China in 2017. In total, 608 Chinese police officers were surveyed, all of whom attended the in-service training program at the university.

Findings

Results suggest that rural officers in China are more likely to embrace the code of silence than their urban counterparts. Additionally, this study demonstrates significant influences of such organizational and environmental factors as police type, agency location and perception of misconduct seriousness on adherence to the code of silence.

Research limitations/implications

This study used a convenient sampling approach, which restricts the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

Given the stronger code of silence among rural officers, there should be more efforts devoted to cultivating a positive ethical climate within rural police organizations. These efforts may need to come from higher levels of government, given the administrative structure in China. In addition, police supervisors in rural agencies should play an important role, given that they are the first line of defense in detecting and responding to misconduct, and are essential in fostering and sustaining a good ethical environment within the police agency.

Originality/value

Using unique policing data collected from China, this study addresses an important gap in the literature regarding research on rural-urban differences in the police code of silence.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2022

Oumeima Kacem and Sana El Harbi

This paper has a triple objective: first, to investigate the effect of the adoption of ethics codes on bank performance, second, to analyse the role played by the risk…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has a triple objective: first, to investigate the effect of the adoption of ethics codes on bank performance, second, to analyse the role played by the risk committee (RC) effectiveness in improving bank performance and finally, to assess the indirect role that the implementation of ethics codes exerts on the latter relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The research questions are examined using an international sample of large banks worldwide from 2006 to 2017, applying the dynamic generalized method of moments (GMM) model for panel data.

Findings

The authors find that risk management committee size and independence have a positive and significant effect on bank performance. This highlights the importance of the risk governance function in enhancing bank performance. Most importantly results reveal that although larger RC tends to improve bank performance, this linkage is less strong when adopting ethical codes. They also find that the adoption of ethical codes by banks positively affects the relationship between the functioning of RC and performance.

Originality/value

Although it is well known that risk management, business ethics and performance are interrelated, there is no research that has dealt with this question.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2022

Janie Alison Brown, Elaine Watson and Tamra Rogers

This study aimed to understand the effect of repeated exposure to personal threats on hospital security guards' well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to understand the effect of repeated exposure to personal threats on hospital security guards' well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A single site, qualitative study using a convenience sampling approach to recruit hospital security guards who attend code black (staff, patient or visitor exposed to a personal threat) calls.

Findings

Five interviews were held with eight hospital security guards. Seven of the eight participants were male. Seven were Caucasian. All had extensive experience in the industry. Six consistent themes emerged from the data covering well-being, coping and support; concerns about physical safety; compassion and compassion fatigue; effective communication is crucial; role/s; and training and equipment.

Research limitations/implications

This study used a convenient sampling approach to recruit security guards from one acute hospital in Australia, limiting the applicability of the findings to other contexts. Although the majority of hospital security guards were interviewed, the format of interviews varied between one-to-one interviews and focus groups, based on the availability of guards to participate and attend.

Practical implications

We recommend that the role of the hospital security guard in Code black situations is documented in policy and practice documents, and articulated in multidisciplinary aggression management training. There should be clear statements on the importance of strong communication and clinical leadership in code black situations. Hospital security guards should attend Mental Health First Aid training, which teaches on and off the job coping strategies. There is a need for debriefing and consideration should be given to supporting “time-out”. Hospital security guards require education on infection control and the risks associated with blood and body fluids.

Originality/value

Hospital security guards play an important role in the safety of patients and staff in code black situations. When they are well supported, they experience high levels of job satisfaction and are able to maintain their compassion towards people who are aggressive and violent towards them. However, repeated exposure to code black situations has the potential to erode the well-being of hospital security guards.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Bodo B. Schlegelmilch and Jane E. Houston

Business ethics is an area growing in importancefor business managers. Research in the USAsuggests that three‐quarters of major corporationshave specific codes of ethics…

2066

Abstract

Business ethics is an area growing in importance for business managers. Research in the USA suggests that three‐quarters of major corporations have specific codes of ethics, and in the UK some 40 per cent (and increasing) of major organisations have codes of ethics. This article explains a survey on corporate ethics undertaken in the UK and points to some reasons why firms choose to have codes of ethics, and why some firms do not. It concludes by suggesting that further research is needed, especially on the perceived benefits of a corporate code of ethics to organisations.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Brian J. Farrell and Deirdre M. Cobbin

Focuses on the status of ethics in the larger and more significant Australian business corporations, using a survey instrument. The findings cover the origins of…

1078

Abstract

Focuses on the status of ethics in the larger and more significant Australian business corporations, using a survey instrument. The findings cover the origins of Australian enterprise codes, their implementation, the use of comprehensive strategies to support them, the sanctions imposed for their breach and the level of ongoing review and reporting. Uses these as criteria of “mainstreaming” ‐ the establishment of a company’s ethics function as a major and central focus of management activities, systems and procedures. Suggests that the extent of “proprietary interest” afforded addressees of codes is an element of code effectiveness and ethics mainstreaming.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Douglas Telford

Growing needs for identification of small items for tracking and traceability purposes have led to the development of encoding structures known as matrix codes, capable of…

Abstract

Growing needs for identification of small items for tracking and traceability purposes have led to the development of encoding structures known as matrix codes, capable of containing machine‐readable data. Describes practical applications for two particular types of high‐density code, the Data Matrix code and the DMT code. The applications relate to needs within the electronics industry, the automotive industry, and the aerospace industry. Through these examples an approach is presented for selecting appropriate codes and marking methods for given applications. The two codes considered, although both high‐density structures, exhibit different features. These are examined as a basis for considering their suitability for the various applications. Later in the paper the codes are discussed, along with the methods of printing and/or realising them in direct‐marking form.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Fei Xu

The purpose of this paper is to explore methods of producing Quick Response (QR) Code, its customization, artistic look and applications and elaborate the technique of…

1328

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore methods of producing Quick Response (QR) Code, its customization, artistic look and applications and elaborate the technique of generating QR Code for library bibliographic records.

Design/methodology/approach

Through literature review, the study explored methods of generating QR Code and its applications in academic libraries. Based on research work and implementation experience, an efficient procedure for generating QR Code for bibliographic records was developed.

Findings

The study identified methods of generating QR Code, its customization and applications, and established the technique of generating QR Code for library bibliographic records.

Originality/value

The study is expected to facilitate the growth of QR Code’s visibility and success, and its mainstream adoption. The technique of generating QR Code for library bibliographic records in the study should be instructive for similar projects.

Details

VINE, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

James A. Tait

FOR CATALOGUERS, and librarians generally, 1967 will prove to be a vintage year, the annus mirabilis for the cataloguer, with the publication in January of the American…

Abstract

FOR CATALOGUERS, and librarians generally, 1967 will prove to be a vintage year, the annus mirabilis for the cataloguer, with the publication in January of the American text of the new Anglo‐American Code. The British text is expected to be published in November. The availability in this country of the American text gives some little time for a preview of the British version. The profession has had ample warning; the new code has had a long gestation period. For the Americans, especially, it is the culmination of many years of effort, from their preliminary second edition of the 1908 code in 1941, through the second edition of 1949, the Library of Congress Rules for Descriptive Cataloging of the same year, the Lubetzky Report of 1953, the Draft Code of 1960, to the Paris Principles of 1961. The present code owes very much to its predecessors, particularly the Paris Principles, which were in effect a set of guidelines agreed on internationally to ensure broad international consistency between any future national codes without spelling out the detailed rules. Except for one or two instances the new code follows the Paris Principles closely.

Details

Library Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

KRISHNAN GOWRI and SEBASTIANO DEPANNI

In order to ensure the health and safety of occupants, buildings must be inspected to check their compliance to current regulatory requirements prompted by occupancy…

Abstract

In order to ensure the health and safety of occupants, buildings must be inspected to check their compliance to current regulatory requirements prompted by occupancy changes, renovations and building code revisions. Recent inspections conducted by Public Works Canada have identified about 1700 occurrences of code violations in 19 buildings. There is an enormous amount of information that can be extracted from the study mentioned above to implement a knowledge‐based expert system to assist in future building inspections. The philosophy of this expert system is to integrate both knowledge‐based and hypertext representation techniques to enable building inspectors to quickly identify code violations, refer to the code text and provide case study information that can assist in resolving a problem. The present paper describes the development framework and details of a prototype implementation known as the Health and Safety Expert System (HASES). The HASES currently addresses the requirements of ‘Section 3.4: Requirements for Exits’ of the 1990 National Building Code of Canada. The software architecture consists of an external database of building details, an object hierarchy and a rule‐base representing the code requirements, hypertext user‐interface for code text and case study information. The ultimate objective is to make this system available for field inspections using notepad computers.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Y. Bajaj, J. Crabtree and A.G. Tucker

Clinical coding is a process of accurate translation of written medical terms into codes. The Payment by Results initiative has focused attention on the quality of…

782

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical coding is a process of accurate translation of written medical terms into codes. The Payment by Results initiative has focused attention on the quality of clinical coded data as all income for in patient services is derived from coded clinical data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of clinical coded data by making comparisons between the information held on the dialect encoder system and the information recorded in the clinical case notes.

Design/methodology/approach

The 50 episodes for this study were randomly selected from a list of all episodes ending August 2005 within the ENT specialty in a teaching hospital.

Findings

There were only 17 (34 per cent) episodes with a structured summary within the case notes. Of the 50 recorded primary diagnoses 42 (84 per cent) were correctly coded. Of the 43 recorded primary procedures, 37 (86 per cent) were correctly coded.

Originality/value

This study promotes a better awareness of the impact of poor coding and gives recommendations that will be helpful to those involved in coding processes.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 111000