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Article

Daniela Mariana de Lima Bragion and Helena Maria André Bolini

Carob has been proposed as a healthy, stimulant-free alternative to chocolate in frozen desserts. In order to make carob a viable and attractive alternative, food…

Abstract

Purpose

Carob has been proposed as a healthy, stimulant-free alternative to chocolate in frozen desserts. In order to make carob a viable and attractive alternative, food producers need to know how it interacts with sweeteners and frozen dessert dispersion matrices. The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal sweetener concentration in three plant-based frozen desserts and carob-flavoured milk dispersion matrix ice cream.

Design/methodology/approach

The ideal sucrose concentrations (per cent) were determined through an affective test using the “just-about-right” scale for carob-flavoured frozen desserts made with cashew nut, coconut and soy beverage, as well as milk dispersion matrix. The sweetness equivalence of artificial sweeteners relative to sucrose was determined by the magnitude estimation test.

Findings

The authors identified the concentrations of sucrose, stevia and sucralose that produced ideal sweetness in carob-flavoured frozen desserts. Concentrations for soy-based frozen desserts differed from the other dispersion mediums tested. Plant-based frozen desserts exhibited a higher ratio of sweetening power of stevia and sucralose to sucrose compared to milk-based ice cream by a factor of 1.18 and 1.14, respectively.

Originality/value

This study undertook a comprehensive survey of a dairy-free and chocolate-free alternative to chocolate ice cream and found new sweetener interactions with dispersion matrices in carob-flavoured frozen desserts. The findings in this study can be applied in the development of carob-flavoured soybean-, coconut-, cashew nut- and milk-based frozen desserts.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Haiyang Gu, Kaiqi Liu, Xingyi Huang, Quansheng Chen, Yanhui Sun and Chin Ping Tan

Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) coupled with support-vector machine (SVM) was carried out to identify and discriminate between the fluorescence spectroscopies of coconut

Abstract

Purpose

Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) coupled with support-vector machine (SVM) was carried out to identify and discriminate between the fluorescence spectroscopies of coconut water brands.

Design/methodology/approach

PARAFAC was applied to reduce three-dimensional data of excitation emission matrix (EEM) to two-dimensional data. SVM was applied to discriminate between six commercial coconut water brands in this study. The three largest variation data from fluorescence spectroscopy were extracted using the PARAFAC method as the input data of SVM classifiers.

Findings

The discrimination results of the six commercial coconut water brands were achieved by three SVM methods (Ga-SVM, PSO-SVM and Grid-SVM). The best classification accuracies were 100.00%, 96.43% and 94.64% for the training set, test set and CV accuracy.

Originality/value

The above results indicate that fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PARAFAC and SVM methods proved to be a simple and rapid detection method for coconut water and perhaps other beverages.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

M. Anil Ramesh and Madhusudan Kumar Kota

COCO TANG India is an innovation-driven company. It takes inspiration from the humble coconut water that all of us are very familiar with and have drunk right from our…

Abstract

COCO TANG India is an innovation-driven company. It takes inspiration from the humble coconut water that all of us are very familiar with and have drunk right from our childhood. The founders of the company, Dr Neelima, a dentist by profession and her husband Chaitanya who is a pharmacist have hit upon the idea of a coconut-based drink quite by accident.

When Dr Neelima was pregnant with her first child, the doctor advised her to take fresh coconut water. It was then that Dr Neelima discovered that fresh coconut water was a paradox, the water from a tender coconut is supposed to be fresh but in many cases is not as fresh as it should be. Coconuts are harvested from remote farms in Andhra Pradesh and sent to Hyderabad. And to top it all, the nutrition value of the coconut past its ideal window of consumption leaves a lot to desire. The price factor too is a dampener. It costs Rs. 25 to have tender coconut water in a metropolis like Hyderabad.

Dr Neelima and her husband developed the product idea from their search for a nutritious, healthy drink. Fresh, tender coconut pulp-based shakes, packed with nutrition, taste, health and at the same time make an aspirational product for the young, bubbly and restless youth of India.

This case deals with the problems, the trials and tribulations that these young first-time entrepreneurs faced and details the marketing efforts the young company is putting into survive in the dog eat dog world of fruit drink industry.

The case details the specific marketing-related problems the company faces and examines what the promoters are doing to overcome these problems, specifically related to the four Ps, that is, product, price, place and promotion. It looks in depth at the innovative marketing practices that COCO TANG India is deploying, including the use of the social media that enabled the COCO TANG India’s founder to win Junior Chamber International – Business Excellence Award for the year 2017–2018.

COCO TANG India is also the recipient of the Telugu book of records ‘certificate of national record’ as being the first brand to introduce Tender Coconut-based Mocktails and Milkshakes (A1).

Details

Start-up Marketing Strategies in India
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-755-9

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to develop plant-based babassu milk flavored with grape fruit (GF).

Design/methodology/approach

A four mixed beverages formulations containing 15%, 25%, 35% and 45% GF were produced. The pH, titratable acidity (TA), soluble solids (SS), sugar: acid ratio and color analysis were performed. Sensory evaluation was measured by the hedonic scale, just-about-right (JAR) scale and purchase intent. Moreover, a check-all-that-apply (CATA) form was applied to obtain description data on the formulations.

Findings

The pH values of mixed beverages decreased (p < 0.05) when the concentration of GF increased, while the TA and the SS increased (p < 0.05). The GF addition provided the product with greater opaque and redness. Sensory evaluation revealed good consumer acceptance. For the hedonic scale, 35% and 45% GF contributed to the higher acceptance of color, appearance, flavor and overall liking attributes. For JAR data, the flavor grape term was highest in the JAR region (51%) with 45% GF. Based on the frequency of terms cited by consumers in the CATA test, the treatment with 15% GF was described by babassu flavor, strange and low astringency terms. For purchase intent, most consumers would buy the product with 35% and 45% GF.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that babassu, an almond little used industrially, is an alternate to plant-based milk. The higher sensory acceptance occurs when 45% GF is used for its flavoring. The CATA indicated that ideal sweetness, striking, acid and ideal grape flavor described the better beverage.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Samer Al-Shami, Abdullah Al Mamun, Safiah Sidek and Nurulizwa Rashid

This paper aims to explore the specific causes of failure among Malaysian female entrepreneurs who were provided with financial services by the microfinance institution…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the specific causes of failure among Malaysian female entrepreneurs who were provided with financial services by the microfinance institution: Amanah Ikhtiar Malaysia (AIM) to start up their own businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a qualitative-based case study design approach, with data collected from a total of 18 female entrepreneurs who had failed to develop their businesses. In-depth personal interviews were conducted, coupled with personal observation via purposive cum snowball sampling.

Findings

Thematic analysis revealed a pattern-based outcome which discloses a variety of causes affecting the failure of Malaysian female entrepreneurship. These causes ranged from inter-related external factors which were perceived as beyond their control, such as personal life events, intensive competition and loan inflexibility to internal causes, which were related to lack of resources, poor financial management and personal dissatisfaction with their own business performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study provide valuable information for Malaysian economic policymakers in how to practically address the objectives of the National Women's Policy (NPW) and improve the innovative quality of their products and services. A thorough understanding of the specific obstacles facing female entrepreneurs in Malaysia is essential if policymakers are to improve opportunity exploitation efficiency and assist in mitigating the external and internal causes of business failure among Malaysian females.

Originality/value

Studies in this field have demonstrated that most new “start-ups” fail within three years of their establishment. While determinist, emotive and voluntarist theories can often provide an adequate explanation for the causes of business failure, it is clear that no single factor is usually responsible. Rather, multiple interrelated factors are found to be at play. This study, therefore, provides an integrative model for causes of business failure among small-business female entrepreneurs. It also represents one of only a few such studies in the literature and, to the best of knowledge at the time of writing, is the first such study that used an integrative approach to explain the causes of business failure in the Malaysian context.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article

Shahriar Kabir, Syed Shams and Roger Lawrey

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between trade diversion risk and new Halal market exploration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between trade diversion risk and new Halal market exploration.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes the Halal trade flows for Malaysia’s top 11 halal food/food-related commodities from 1967 to 2018 by relying on co-integration and auto-regression techniques.

Findings

This paper determines that the greater the country’s current comparative advantage in an exported good, the higher the risk of export diversion between the Halal and conventional markets. The diversion risk, however, disappears with a lower current comparative advantage.

Practical implications

To take advantage of the fast-emerging Halal market, a country should expand export of commodities with relatively low current comparative advantage but high demand in the target market, along with supportive trade policies to build competitiveness in the long term.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap in the literature by investigating if the theory of comparative advantage can predict the market diversification risk that may arise from the expansion of exports to the Halal market occurring alongside existing exports to the conventional market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article

Anil Panghal, Rakesh Patidar, Sundeep Jaglan, Navnidhi Chhikara, Sunil K. Khatkar, Yogesh Gat and Neelesh Sindhu

The purpose of this paper is to review the advanced technologies and approaches for utilization of waste generated in dairy industry. Whey is highly contaminated, with a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the advanced technologies and approaches for utilization of waste generated in dairy industry. Whey is highly contaminated, with a high organic load around 100,000 mg O2/L COD (chemical oxygen demand), and is not used for further processing. The waste generated in different food industries can be utilized in different value addition product with the help of advanced technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Major well-known bibliometric information sources are the Web of Science, Scopus, Mendeley and Google Scholar. Several keywords like nutrition value of whey, whey utilization, whey valorization, whey technologies, whey beverages, fruit-based whey beverage, carbonated beverage, probiotic or alcoholic beverages, herbal beverage, fermented beverage and current scenarios were chosen to obtain a large range of papers to be analyzed. A final inventory of 126 scientific sources was made after sorting and classifying them according to different criteria based on topic, academic field country of origin and year of publication.

Findings

The comprehensive review of different literature, data sources and research papers seeks to find and discuss various sustainable solutions to this huge waste generated from milk industry. The sustainable use of whey for production and conversion in different types of products can uplift the bio-based economy of industries and thereof national/international economy. The recent upsurge in consumer interest for health-promoting products has opened up new vistas for whey beverages and other whey products research and development.

Originality/value

The paper draws out different sustainable characteristics and technology of whey products available in market, as well as potential products to be launched in the market. Interestingly, over the past few years, dairy industries have applied various technologies to process cheese whey and are in search of new products which can be prepared from the by-product. This review discusses on the recent research development of whey valorization with particular reference to technologies used in the addition to their commercial availability and a way forward.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of Saccharomyces boulardii on the kinetics of fermentation for organic and conventional apple pulp and to verify the effect of the antioxidant quercetin on the response to cellular oxidative stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The kinetic parameters, the content of phenolic compounds, the quantity of quercetin and the antioxidant activity were determined during the fermentation process. The effect of quercetin on cellular oxidative stress was also investigated.

Findings

The content of phenolic compounds, the antioxidant activity and the quercetin concentration were higher in the organic fermented apple pulp (ORG) than in the conventional fermented apple pulp (CON). However, both apple pulps were considered ideal substrates for the growth of S. boulardii, suggesting that they are potentially probiotic. After fermentation, the quercetin concentration in the ORG treatment and YPDQ treatment (YPD broth with 0.1 mg quercetin rhamnoside/mL) increased viability by 9%, while in the CON treatment generated there was an increase of 6% in viability, compared to the YPD control treatment (YPD broth).

Originality/value

The high concentration of quercetin in the organic apple pulp supports the proposal that quercetin reduces the oxidative stress mediated by reactive oxygen species through its antioxidant action on S. boulardii that have similarities to mammalian eukaryotic cells. These findings suggest that fermented organic apple pulp could be consumed as a potential non-dairy probiotic product.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

David Yoon Kin Tong, Xue Fa Tong and Evon Yin

This study has two aims: first, to develop a conceptual model for infused drinks innovation using the subjective norm and lifestyle as predictors; and second, to adapt the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study has two aims: first, to develop a conceptual model for infused drinks innovation using the subjective norm and lifestyle as predictors; and second, to adapt the beverage science experimental variables and assess young consumers' experience of the taste, mood and health of infused drinks using the moderated mediation method.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quota sampling, the data were collected from three faculties in a private university. The conceptual model was developed using structural equation modelling (SEM). The model was validated by the first‐ and second‐order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of SEM. The multi‐dimensional variables of the taste, mood and health of the infused drinks were computed by the moderated mediation process and the final mediation effects were confirmed using Aroian tests.

Findings

The subjective norm and lifestyle variables predict innovation in infused soft drinks. The results from the moderated mediation analyses indicate that both male and female young consumers prefer the innovation of drinks to suit local tastes and be produced locally; the drinks should also have health and well‐being benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of 350 students was sufficient but the generalisability of the result was limited by the students being recruited from one university.

Practical implications

Parents may influence their children to change their favourite drinks if they are expensive. For this reason, the pricing strategy is important to price‐sensitive consumers. Offering favourite infused drinks to friends is often part of the lifestyle in Malaysia. In practice, implied recommendation is possible. If this happens, there is the likelihood that it may be communicated through the social network. Marketers should use this platform for promoting new drinks. Beverage innovators should learn from the local popular infused drinks as the baseline for drinks innovation and should innovate to suit local tastes. In particular, beverage manufacturers should consider satisfying the market segmentations for flavour lovers and health seekers. Lastly, for effective soft drinks advertising, it is recommended that beverage marketers should use trendy components in promotions.

Originality/value

The study highlights the possibility of conducting social research by incorporating variables from experimental studies. By using this method, external validation is possible when the measures are applied in an uncontrived setting. In addition, it could provide a better assessment of consumers' needs for product innovation.

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Article

Alton Y.K Chua and Snehasish Banerjee

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the extent to which the use of social media can support customer knowledge management (CKM) in organizations relying on a

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the extent to which the use of social media can support customer knowledge management (CKM) in organizations relying on a traditional bricks‐and‐mortar business model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a combination of qualitative case study and netnography on Starbucks, an international coffee house chain. Data retrieved from varied sources such as newspapers, newswires, magazines, scholarly publications, books, and social media services were textually analyzed.

Findings

Three major findings could be culled from the paper. First, Starbucks deploys a wide range of social media tools for CKM that serve as effective branding and marketing instruments for the organization. Second, Starbucks redefines the roles of its customers through the use of social media by transforming them from passive recipients of beverages to active contributors of innovation. Third, Starbucks uses effective strategies to alleviate customers' reluctance for voluntary knowledge sharing, thereby promoting engagement in social media.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the paper is limited by the window of the data collection period. Hence, the findings should be interpreted in the light of this constraint.

Practical implications

The lessons gleaned from the case study suggest that social media is not a tool exclusive to online businesses. It can be a potential game‐changer in supporting CKM efforts even for traditional businesses.

Originality/value

This paper represents one of the earliest works that analyzes the use of social media for CKM in an organization that relies on a traditional bricks‐and‐mortar business model.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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